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Fresh Water: Water containing no significant amounts of salts, such as water from Rivers and Lakes.

Reverse Dissection and DiceCT Reveal Otherwise Hidden Data in the Evolution of the Primate Face

1Department of Physical Therapy, Duquesne University, 2Department of Anthropology, University of Pittsburgh, 3College of Sciences, North Carolina State University, 4Shared Materials Instrumentation Facility, Duke University, 5Department of Anthropology, University of Florida

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 58394


 JoVE In-Press

Determination of the Settling Rate of Clay/Cyanobacterial Floccules

1Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, 2Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, 3Department of Earth Sciences, Simon Fraser University, 4Earth Sciences Department, University of Toronto

JoVE 57176


 Environment

Magnetic and Thermal-sensitive Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-based Microgels for Magnetically Triggered Controlled Release

1Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, 2Department of Materials Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, 3Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Bandung Institute of Technology and Science, 4Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, 5Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University

JoVE 55648


 Bioengineering

Production of Chemicals by Klebsiella pneumoniae Using Bamboo Hydrolysate as Feedstock

1Lab of Biorefinery, Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 3Biorefinery Research Center, Jeonbuk Branch Institute, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience & Biotechnology (KRIBB), 4School of Life Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University

JoVE 55828


 Bioengineering

Quantitatively Measuring In situ Flows using a Self-Contained Underwater Velocimetry Apparatus (SCUVA)

1Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2Environmental Science and Marine Biology, Roger Williams University, 3Marine Biology Laboratory, Whitman Center, 4Department of Biology, Providence College, 5Departments of Aeronautics and Bioengineering, California Institute of Technology

JoVE 2615


 Bioengineering

Rapid and Efficient Zebrafish Genotyping Using PCR with High-resolution Melt Analysis

1Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah School of Medicine, 2Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Utah School of Medicine, 3Interdepartmental Program in Neurosciences, University of Utah School of Medicine, 4Mutation Generation and Detection Core, HSC Core Research Facility, University of Utah School of Medicine, 5Department of Neurology, University of Utah School of Medicine

JoVE 51138


 Biology

Complete Spinal Cord Injury and Brain Dissection Protocol for Subsequent Wholemount In Situ Hybridization in Larval Sea Lamprey

1Centre for Neuroregeneration, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Edinburgh, 2Shriners Hospitals Pediatric Research Center (Center for Neural Repair and Rehabilitation), Temple University School of Medicine, 3Department of Neurology, Temple University School of Medicine

JoVE 51494


 Neuroscience

An Introduction to the Zebrafish: Danio rerio

JoVE 5128

Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are small freshwater fish that are used as model organisms for biomedical research. The many strengths of these fish include their high degree of genetic conservation with humans and their simple, inexpensive maintenance. Additionally, gene expression can be easily manipulated in zebrafish embryos, and their transparency allows for observation of developmental processes. This overview video first introduces basic zebrafish biology, including their phylogeny, life cycle, and natural environment, before presenting the features that make them so useful in the lab. A brief history of zebrafish research is also provided through a review of major discoveries made in fish, ranging from the early establishment of methods for efficient genetic screening to the discovery of novel therapeutics for human diseases such as cancer. Finally, some of the many avenues of experimentation performed in zebrafish are discussed, including immunological and developmental studies.


 Biology II

Zebrafish Maintenance and Husbandry

JoVE 5152

The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a powerful vertebrate model system for studying development, modeling disease, and screening for novel therapeutics. Due to their small size, large numbers of zebrafish can be housed in the laboratory at low cost. Although zebrafish are relatively easy to maintain, special consideration must be given to both diet and water quality to in order to optimize fish health and reproductive success. This video will provide an overview of zebrafish husbandry and maintenance in the lab. After a brief review of the natural zebrafish habitat, techniques essential to recreating this environment in the lab will be discussed, including key elements of fish facility water recirculation systems and the preparation of brine shrimp as part of the zebrafish diet. Additionally, the presentation will include information on how specific zebrafish strains are tracked in a laboratory setting, with specific reference to the collection of tail fin samples for DNA extraction and genotyping. Finally, experimental modifications of the zebrafish environment will be discussed as a means to further our understanding of these fish, and in turn, ourselves.


 Biology II

Detecting Environmental Microorganisms with the Polymerase Chain Reaction and Gel Electrophoresis

JoVE 10081

Source: Laboratories of Dr. Ian Pepper and Dr. Charles Gerba - Arizona University
Demonstrating Author: Bradley Schmitz

Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a technique used to detect microorganisms that are present in soil, water, and atmospheric environments. By amplifying specific sections of DNA, PCR can facilitate the detection and identification of target microorganisms down to the species, strain, and serovar/pathovar level. The technique can also be utilized to characterize entire communities of microorganisms in samples. The culturing of microorganisms in the laboratory using specialized growth media is a long-established technique and remains in use for the detection of microorganisms in environmental samples. Many microbes in the natural environment, while alive, maintain low levels of metabolic activity and/or doubling times and are thus referred to as viable but non-culturable (VBNC) organisms. The use of culture-based techniques alone cannot detect these microbes and, therefore, does not provide a thorough assessment of microbial populations in samples. The use of PCR allows for the detection of culturable microbes, VBNC organisms, and those that are no longer alive or active, as the amplification of genetic sequences does not generally require the pre-enrichment of microorga


 Environmental Microbiology

Identification of Critical Conditions for Immunostaining in the Pea Aphid Embryos: Increasing Tissue Permeability and Decreasing Background Staining

1Department of Entomology, National Taiwan University, 2Institute of Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, 3Research Center for Developmental Biology and Regenerative Medicine, National Taiwan University, 4Genome and Systems Biology Degree Program, National Taiwan University and Academia Sinica

JoVE 53883


 Developmental Biology

An Overview of bGDGT Biomarker Analysis for Paleoclimatology

JoVE 10256

Source: Laboratory of Jeff Salacup - University of Massachusetts Amherst

Throughout this series of videos, natural samples were extracted and purified in search of organic compounds, called biomarkers, that can relate information on climates and environments of the past. One of the samples analyzed was sediment. Sediments accumulate over geologic time in basins, depressions in the Earth into which sediment flows through the action of fluid (water or air), movement, and gravity. Two main types of basins exist, marine (oceans and seas) and lacustrine (lakes). As one might guess, very different types of life live in these settings, driven in large part by the difference in salinity between them. Over the last few decades, organic geochemists discovered a toolbox of biomarker proxies, or compounds that can be used to describe climate or environment, some of which work in marine environments and some of which work in lacustrine. We turn our attention here to the lacustrine realm and branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (Figure 1). In this section we focus on analysis of terrestrial paleotemperature using branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetrathers (Figure 1; brGDGTs) and the MBT/CBT proxy. This proxy was initially described by Weijers et


 Earth Science

Fabrication of Small Caliber Stent-grafts Using Electrospinning and Balloon Expandable Bare Metal Stents

1Division of Engineering, Mayo Clinic, 2Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, 3Department of Cardioangiology, ICRC, St. Anne's University Hospital, 4Department of Vascular Surgery, Mayo Clinic, 5Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic

JoVE 54731


 Medicine

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