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G1 Phase: The period of the Cell cycle preceding Dna replication in S Phase. Subphases of G1 include "competence" (to respond to growth factors), G1a (entry into G1), G1b (progression), and G1c (assembly). Progression through the G1 subphases is effected by limiting growth factors, nutrients, or inhibitors.

Imaging- and Flow Cytometry-based Analysis of Cell Position and the Cell Cycle in 3D Melanoma Spheroids

1The Centenary Institute, 2Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, 3The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, The University of Queensland, 4Department of Dermatology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, 5Discipline of Dermatology, University of Sydney

JoVE 53486


 Medicine

Mammalian Cell Division in 3D Matrices via Quantitative Confocal Reflection Microscopy

1Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 2Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences - Oncology Center, Johns Hopkins University, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 4Departments of Oncology and Pathology and Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

JoVE 56364


 Bioengineering

Cell Sorting of Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells from the Adult Mouse Subventricular Zone and Live-imaging of their Cell Cycle Dynamics

1CEA DSV iRCM SCSR, Laboratoire de Radiopathologie, UMR 967, 2INSERM, UMR 967, 3Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR 967, 4Université Paris Sud, UMR 967, 5CNRS, Université Paris Sud, UMR 9197, Neuroscience Paris-Saclay Institute, Molecules Circuits Department

JoVE 53247


 Neuroscience

Laser Microirradiation to Study In Vivo Cellular Responses to Simple and Complex DNA Damage

1Department of Biological Chemistry, School of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, 2Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, 3Department of Developmental and Cell Biology, School of Biological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, 4Department of Biomedical Engineering and Surgery, University of California, Irvine

JoVE 56213


 Genetics

Lens-free Video Microscopy for the Dynamic and Quantitative Analysis of Adherent Cell Culture

1CEA, LETI, DTBS, LISA, Université Grenoble Alpes, 2CEA, LETI, DTBS, LBAM, Université Grenoble Alpes, 3CEA, INSERM, BIG, Université Grenoble Alpes, 4CNRS, FR CNRS 3425, 5CNRS, UMR 144, Molecular Mechanisms of Intracellular Transport, PSL Research University, Institut Curie, 6TIMC-IMAG

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56580


 JoVE In-Press

Live Cell Imaging of Chromosome Segregation During Mitosis

1Division of Cellular and Gene Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, US Food and Drug Administration, 2Microscopy and Imaging Core facility, Division of Viral Products, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, US Food and Drug Administration, 3Division of Cellular and Gene Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, US Food and Drug Administration

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 57389


 JoVE In-Press

High-throughput Quantitative Real-time RT-PCR Assay for Determining Expression Profiles of Types I and III Interferon Subtypes

1Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, US Food and Drug Administration, 2Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, US Food and Drug Administration

JoVE 52650


 Immunology and Infection

Yeast Reproduction

JoVE 5097

Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a species of yeast that is an extremely valuable model organism. Importantly, S. cerevisiae is a unicellular eukaryote that undergoes many of the same biological processes as humans. This video provides an introduction to the yeast cell cycle, and explains how S. cerevisiae reproduces both asexually and sexually Yeast reproduce asexually through a process known as budding. In contrast, yeast sometimes participate in sexual reproduction, which is important because it introduces genetic variation to a population. During environmentally stressful conditions, S. cerevisiae will undergo meiosis and form haploid spores that are released when environmental conditions improve. During sexual reproduction, these haploid spores fuse, ultimately forming a diploid zygote. In the lab, yeast can be genetically manipulated to further understand the genetic regulation of the cell cycle, reproduction, aging, and development. Therefore, scientists study the reproduction of yeast to gain insight into processes that are important in human biology.


 Biology I

Cell Cycle Analysis

JoVE 5641

Cell cycle refers to the set of events through which a cell grows, replicates its genome, and ultimately divides into two daughter cells through the process of mitosis. Because the amount of DNA in a cell shows characteristic changes throughout the cycle, techniques known as cell cycle analysis can be used to separate a population of cells according to the different phases of cell cycle they are in, based on their varying DNA content.This video will cover the principles behind cell cycle analysis via DNA-staining. We will review a generalized protocol for performing this staining using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU, a thymidine analog that is incorporated into newly synthesized DNA strands) and propidium iodide (PI, a DNA dye that stains all DNA), followed by analysis of the stained cells with flow cytometry. During flow cytometry, a single cell suspension of fluorescently labeled cells is passed through an instrument with a laser beam and the fluorescence of each cell is read. We will then discuss how to interpret data from flow cytometric scatter plots, and finally, look at a few applications of this technique.


 Cell Biology

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