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Gene Therapy: The introduction of new genes into cells for the purpose of treating disease by restoring or adding gene expression. Techniques include insertion of retroviral vectors, transfection, homologous recombination, and injection of new genes into the nuclei of single cell embryos. The entire gene therapy process may consist of multiple steps. The new genes may be introduced into proliferating cells in vivo (e.g., bone marrow) or in vitro (e.g., fibroblast cultures) and the modified cells transferred to the site where the gene expression is required. Gene therapy may be particularly useful for treating enzyme deficiency diseases, hemoglobinopathies, and leukemias and may also prove useful in restoring drug sensitivity, particularly for leukemia.

Gene Therapy

JoVE 10815

Gene therapy is a technique where a gene is inserted into a person’s cells to prevent or treat a serious disease. The added gene may be a healthy version of the gene that is mutated in the patient, or it could be a different gene that inactivates or compensates for the patient’s disease-causing gene. For example, in patients with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) due to a mutation in the gene for the enzyme adenosine deaminase, a functioning version of the gene can be inserted. The patient’s cells can then make the enzyme, curing this potentially deadly disease in some cases. Genes can be introduced into a patient’s cells in two main ways: in vivo—directly into a person through injection into specific tissues or into the bloodstream; and ex vivo—into cells that have been removed from the patient, which are transplanted back after the gene is inserted. The gene is usually inserted into a vector—often a virus that has been modified to not cause disease—to get the gene into the patient’s cells and delivered to the nucleus. In some cases—for instance, when retroviral vectors are used—the gene is randomly inserted into the person’s genome, leading to stable expression of the inserted gene. In others—such as when adenoviral vectors are used—the gene does not integrate i

 Core: Biotechnology

Ultrahigh Resolution Mouse Optical Coherence Tomography to Aid Intraocular Injection in Retinal Gene Therapy Research

1Research Service, VA Western New York Healthcare System, 2Department of Ophthalmology, (Ross Eye Institute), Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo- SUNY, 3Pharmacology/Toxicology, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo- SUNY, 4Physiology/Biophysics, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo- SUNY, 5Neuroscience Program, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo- SUNY, 6The RNA Institute, University at Buffalo- SUNY, 7The SUNY Eye Institute

JoVE 55894

 Medicine

Using the BLT Humanized Mouse as a Stem Cell based Gene Therapy Tumor Model

1Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 2UCLA AIDS Institute, 3Eli & Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA, 4Department of Medical and Molecular Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 5Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA

JoVE 4181

 Immunology and Infection

What is Genetic Engineering?

JoVE 10806

Genetic engineering is the process of modifying an organism’s DNA to introduce new, desirable traits. Many organisms, from bacteria to plants and animals, have been genetically modified for academic, medical, agricultural, and industrial purposes. While genetic engineering has definite benefits, ethical concerns surround modifying humans and our food supply.

Genetic engineering is possible because the genetic code—the way information is encoded by DNA—and the structure of DNA are universal among all life forms. As a result, an organism’s genetic code may be modified in several ways. The nucleotide sequence may be selectively edited by using techniques such as the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Known as the "molecular scissors," the CRISPR/Cas9 system is an innate, prokaryotic immune response that has been co-opted for editing genetic information. A gene may also be removed from an organism to create a “knockout,” or introduced to create a “knockin,” through a process called gene targeting. This method relies on homologous recombination—genetic exchange between DNA molecules that share an extended region with similar sequences—to modify an endogenous gene. Scientists can also insert a gene from one organism into the genome of another, resulting in a transgenic organism. Generally, DNA

 Core: Biotechnology

An Overview of Genetic Engineering

JoVE 5552

Genetic engineering – the process of purposefully altering an organism’s DNA – has been used to create powerful research tools and model organisms, and has also seen many agricultural applications. However, in order to engineer traits to tackle complex agricultural problems such as stress tolerance, or to realize the promise of gene therapy for treating…

 Genetics

X-linked Traits

JoVE 10980

In most mammalian species, females have two X sex chromosomes and males have an X and Y. As a result, mutations on the X chromosome in females may be masked by the presence of a normal allele on the second X. In contrast, a mutation on the X chromosome in males more often causes observable biological defects, as there is no normal X to compensate. Trait variations arising from mutations on the X chromosome are called “X-linked”. One well-studied example of an X-linked trait is color blindness. When a mutation occurs in the genes responsible for red and green color vision in the photoreceptors of the retina, color blindness may occur. While this recessive mutation can cause females to be color blind, they must possess two mutated X chromosomes. Color blindness is much more common in males, who only have one X chromosome and therefore no second copy to potentially compensate for the mutation. Color blindness is passed from mother to son; a mutated X will be passed from the mother to half of her sons, who receive a Y from their father. Meanwhile, colorblind males will pass on the allele for color blindness to all of their daughters, who will be either carriers or color blind, depending on the maternal allele received. Occasionally, this type of X-linked mutation can also arise by spontaneous mutation and not as the result of inheritance from mother or

 Core: Classical and Modern Genetics

Blood Withdrawal II

JoVE 10247

Source: Kay Stewart, RVT, RLATG, CMAR; Valerie A. Schroeder, RVT, RLATG. University of Notre Dame, IN


The collection of blood from mice and rats for analysis can be done through a variety of methods. Each method of collection has variations in the type of restraint required, the invasiveness of the procedure, and the necessity of a general …

 Lab Animal Research

Microinjection of CRISPR/Cas9 Protein into Channel Catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, Embryos for Gene Editing

1School of Fisheries, Aquaculture and Aquatic Sciences, Auburn University, 2Department of Animal Wealth Development, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Suez Canal University, 3Anatomy and Embryology Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Cairo University, 4Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University, 5Life Science Institute, University of Michigan

JoVE 56275

 Genetics

A Novel Surgical Approach for Intratracheal Administration of Bioactive Agents in a Fetal Mouse Model

1Molecular Virology and Gene Therapy, KU Leuven, 2Department of Woman and Child, KU Leuven, 3Neurobiology and Gene Therapy, KU Leuven, 4Division of Nuclear Medicine, KU Leuven, 5Biomedical NMR Unit/ MoSAIC, KU Leuven

JoVE 4219

 Medicine

Preparation and In Vitro Characterization of Magnetized miR-modified Endothelial Cells

1Reference and Translation Center for Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy (RTC), Department of Cardiac Surgery, University of Rostock, 2Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, 3Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald, 4Electron Microscopy Center, University of Rostock

JoVE 55567

 Medicine

The Aortic Ring Co-culture Assay: A Convenient Tool to Assess the Angiogenic Potential of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells In Vitro

1Create Fertility Centre, 2Department of Physiology, University of Toronto, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Toronto, 4Department of Medical Sciences, University of Toronto, 5Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Women's College Hospital

JoVE 56083

 Developmental Biology

Percutaneous Contrast Echocardiography-guided Intramyocardial Injection and Cell Delivery in a Large Preclinical Model

1Institute for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, School of Biological Sciences, University of Reading, 2Departamento de Medicina y Cirugía Animal, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Murcia, 3Institute of Virology and Immunology (IVI), 4Departamento de Anatomía y Anatomía Comparada, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Murcia, 5Unidad de Trasplante Hematopoyético y Terapia Celular, Departamento de Hematología, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, IMIB, Universidad de Murcia

JoVE 56699

 Medicine

A Unified Methodological Framework for Vestibular Schwannoma Research

1Eaton Peabody Laboratories, Department of Otolaryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear, 2Department of Otolaryngology, Harvard Medical School, 3Department of Otolaryngology, Vienna General Hospital, Medical University of Vienna, 4Program in Speech and Hearing Bioscience and Technology, Harvard Medical School

JoVE 55827

 Cancer Research

Lentiviral Vector Platform for the Efficient Delivery of Epigenome-editing Tools into Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Disease Models

1Department of Neurology, Duke University Medical Center, 2Center for Genomic and Computational Biology, Duke University Medical Center, 3Viral Vector Core, Duke University Medical Center, 4Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University Medical Center

JoVE 59241

 Genetics

CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Targeted Integration In Vivo Using a Homology-mediated End Joining-based Strategy

1Institute of Neuroscience, State Key Laboratory of Neuroscience, Key Laboratory of Primate Neurobiology, CAS Center for Excellence in Brain Science and Intelligence Technology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2College of Life Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 3School of Life Science and Technology, Shanghai Tech University, 4Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences

JoVE 56844

 Genetics
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