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Genes, cdc: Genes that code for proteins that regulate the Cell division cycle. These genes form a regulatory network that culminates in the onset of Mitosis by activating the p34cdc2 protein (Protein p34cdc2).
 JoVE In-Press

The C. elegans Intestine As a Model for Intercellular Lumen Morphogenesis and In Vivo Polarized Membrane Biogenesis at the Single-cell Level

1Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center, Developmental Biology and Genetics Core, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 2College of Life Sciences, Jilin University, 3Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau

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JoVE 56100

 JoVE Biology

Chitosan/Interfering RNA Nanoparticle Mediated Gene Silencing in Disease Vector Mosquito Larvae

1Division of Biology, Kansas State University, 2Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, Indiana University School of Medicine, 3Eck Institute for Global Health, University of Notre Dame, 4Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 5Department of Entomology, Kansas State University


JoVE 52523

 JoVE Medicine

Working with Human Tissues for Translational Cancer Research

1Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 2Department of Genomic Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 3Department of Pathology and Institutional Tissue Bank, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center


JoVE 53189

 Science Education: Essentials of Cell Biology

An Introduction to Cell Division

JoVE Science Education

Cell division is the process by which a parent cell divides and gives rise to two or more daughter cells. It is a means of reproduction for single-cell organisms. In multicellular organisms, cell division contributes to growth, development, repair, and the generation of reproductive cells (sperms and eggs). Cell division is a tightly regulated process, and aberrant cell division can cause diseases, notably cancer. JoVE's Introduction to Cell Division will cover a brief history of the landmark discoveries in the field. We then discuss several key questions and methods, such as cell cycle analysis and live cell imaging. Finally, we showcase some current applications of these techniques in cell division research.

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

A Rapid Strategy for the Isolation of New Faustoviruses from Environmental Samples Using Vermamoeba vermiformis

1Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Research Unit for Infectious and Tropical Emerging Diseases, Aix Marseille University, 2Pole of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Clinical and Biological Sector, Federation of Bacteriology-Hygiene Virology, University Hospital Institute Mediterranean Infection


JoVE 54104

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Using Zebrafish Models of Human Influenza A Virus Infections to Screen Antiviral Drugs and Characterize Host Immune Cell Responses

1Department of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine, 2Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and Engineering, University of Maine, 3School of Biology and Ecology, University of Maine, 4Division of Intramural Research, Immunity, Inflammation and Disease Laboratory, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, 5Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Maine


JoVE 55235

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 JoVE Immunology and Infection

In Vitro Methods for Comparing Target Binding and CDC Induction Between Therapeutic Antibodies: Applications in Biosimilarity Analysis

1Unit for Development and Research in Bioprocesses Unit (UDIBI), National School of Biological Sciences, National Polytechnic Institute (IPN), University of Mexico (UNAM), 2School of Chemistry, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), 3Graduate Program in Chemical Sciences, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), 4Unit for Development Research and Medical Innovation in Biotechnology (UDIMEB), National School of Biological Sciences, National Polytechnic Institute (IPN), 5Department of Immunology, National Scool of Biological Sciences, National Polytechnic Institute (IPN), 6Department of Pharmacology and Unit of Translational Biomedicine (CMN 20 de noviembre), School of Medicine, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM)


JoVE 55542

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 JoVE Biology

Whole-Body Nanoparticle Aerosol Inhalation Exposures

1Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, 2Center for Cardiovascular and Respiratory Sciences, West Virginia University, 3National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health


JoVE 50263

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 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Saliva, Salivary Gland, and Hemolymph Collection from Ixodes scapularis Ticks

1Microbiology and Pathogenesis Activity, Bacterial Diseases Branch, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2Tick-Borne Diseases Activity, Bacterial Diseases Branch, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


JoVE 3894

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 JoVE In-Press

Electroencephalographic, Heart Rate, and Galvanic Skin Response Assessment for an Advertising Perception Study: Application to Antismoking Public Service Announcements

1Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, 2Department of Communication and Social Research, Sapienza University of Rome, 3Department of Anatomical, Histological, Forensic, and Orthopedic Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, 4BrainSigns SRL

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JoVE 55872

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 Science Education: Essentials of Nursing Skills

Preparing and Administering Subcutaneous Medications

JoVE Science Education

Source: Madeline Lassche, MSNEd, RN and Katie Baraki, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, University of Utah, UT

Subcutaneous medication administration is a parenteral approach to administer small amounts of medication (less than 2 mL) into the layer of tissue just below the skin. Common medications administered via the subcutaneous route include anticoagulant medications, such as heparin or enoxaparin; epinephrine administered for allergic reactions; insulin; and some immunizations. Subcutaneous injection preparations are commonly provided in vials or ampules for withdrawal into a subcutaneous syringe. Subcutaneous needles have a shorter length and smaller diameter than syringes used for intramuscular injections, are typically less than 5/8th of an inch, and are 26 gauge or smaller. Medication absorption and onset is slower than for intravenous routes, with some absorption rates lasting 24 h or longer. This approach is selected for many medications that may be denatured or deactivated if given via the oral route, given the acidity of the gastrointestinal tract. Subcutaneous injection preparations are commonly provided in vials or ampules for withdrawal into a subcutaneous syringe. The nurse should determine the appropriate medication dose according to

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 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Safety Precautions and Operating Procedures in an (A)BSL-4 Laboratory: 1. Biosafety Level 4 Suit Laboratory Suite Entry and Exit Procedures

1Integrated Research Facility at Frederick, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH), 2Environmental Health and Safety, Biological and Chemical Safety Program, University of Texas Medical Branch


JoVE 52317

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 Science Education: Essentials of Nursing Skills

Preparing and Administering Intramuscular Injections

JoVE Science Education

Source: Madeline Lassche, MSNEd, RN and Katie Baraki, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, University of Utah, UT

Intramuscular (IM) injections deposit medications deep into the muscle tissue. Since muscle fibers are well perfused, this route of administration provides quick uptake of the medication and allows for the administration of relatively large volumes. Skeletal muscles have fewer pain-sensing nerves than subcutaneous tissue, which allows for the less painful administration of irritating drugs (e.g., chlorpromazine, an anti-psychotic). IM injections are recommended for patients unable to take oral medications and for uncooperative patients. Some examples of medications that are commonly delivered by IM injections include antibiotics, hormones, and vaccinations. As in any other route of administration, the nurse must consider if the medication is appropriate, given the patient's medical conditions, allergies, and current clinical status. In addition, specifically for IM injections, it is important to assess the patient's muscle mass to determine the appropriate needle size. Also, if the patient has already received this injection, it is necessary to verify the injection site that was previously used and to ensure that the previous dose did not result in any adverse

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