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October, 2006
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Combined Near-infrared Fluorescent Imaging and Micro-computed Tomography for Directly Visualizing Cerebral Thromboemboli

1Molecular Imaging and Neurovascular Research Laboratory, Dongguk University College of Medicine, 2Biomedical Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 3Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 4Departments of Radiology and Cancer Systems Imaging, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

JoVE 54294


Testing the Heat Transfer Efficiency of a Finned-tube Heat Exchanger

JoVE 10437

Source: Michael G. Benton and Kerry M. Dooley, Department of Chemical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

Heat exchangers transfer heat from one fluid to another fluid. Multiple classes of heat exchangers exist to fill different needs. Some of the most common types are shell and tube exchangers and plate exchangers1. Shell and tube heat exchangers use a system of tubes through which fluid flows1. One set of tubes contains the liquid to be cooled or heated, while the second set contains the liquid that will either absorb heat or transmit it1. Plate heat exchangers use a similar concept, in which plates are closely joined together with a small gap between each for liquid to flow1. The fluid flowing between the plates alternates between hot and cold so that heat will move into or out of the necessary streams1. These exchangers have large surface areas, so they are usually more efficient1. The goal for this experiment is to test the heat transfer efficiency of a finned-tube heat exchanger (Figure 1) and compare it to the theoretical efficiency of a heat exchanger without fins. The experimental data will be measured for three diffe

 Chemical Engineering

Transcript and Metabolite Profiling for the Evaluation of Tobacco Tree and Poplar as Feedstock for the Bio-based Industry

1Max Planck Institute for Molecular Plant Physiology, 2School of Biological Sciences, Plant Molecular Science, Centre for Systems and Synthetic Biology, Royal Holloway, University of London, 3Department of Plant Systems Biology, VIB, 4Department of Plant Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, UGhent, 5Institute for Building Materials, ETH Zurich, 6Applied Wood Materials, EMPA, 7Division of Glycoscience, School of Biotechnology, AlbaNova University Center, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), 8European Research and Project Office GmbH, 9ABBA Gaia S.L., 10Pflanzenöltechnologie, 11Capax Environmental Services, 12Green Fuels, 13Neutral Consulting Ltd, 14Plant Cell Biology Research Centre, School of Botany, University of Melbourne

JoVE 51393


Freezing-Point Depression to Determine an Unknown Compound

JoVE 10137

Source: Laboratory of Lynne O' Connell — Boston College

When a solid compound is dissolved in a solvent, the freezing point of the resulting solution is lower than that of the pure solvent. This phenomenon is known as freezing-point depression, and the change in temperature is directly related to the molecular weight of the solute. This experiment is designed to find the identity of an unknown compound by using the phenomenon of freezing-point depression to determine its molecular weight. The compound will be dissolved in cyclohexane, and the freezing point of this solution, as well as that of pure cyclohexane, will be measured. The difference between these two temperatures allows for the calculation of the molecular weight of the unknown substance.

 General Chemistry

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