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Hydrogen Peroxide: A strong oxidizing agent used in aqueous solution as a ripening agent, bleach, and topical anti-infective. It is relatively unstable and solutions deteriorate over time unless stabilized by the addition of acetanilide or similar organic materials.

Determining Rate Laws and the Order of Reaction

JoVE 10193

Source: Laboratory of Dr. Neal Abrams — SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

All chemical reactions have a specific rate defining the progress of reactants going to products. This rate can be influenced by temperature, concentration, and the physical properties of the reactants. The rate also includes the intermediates and transition states that are formed but are neither the reactant nor the product. The rate law defines the role of each reactant in a reaction and can be used to mathematically model the time required for a reaction to proceed. The general form of a rate equation is shown below:     where A and B are concentrations of different molecular species, m and n are reaction orders, and k is the rate constant. The rate of nearly every reaction changes over time as reactants are depleted, making effective collisions less likely to occur. The rate constant, however, is fixed for any single reaction at a given temperature. The reaction order illustrates the number of molecular species involved in a reaction. It is very important to know the rate law, including rate constant and reaction order, which can only be deter


 General Chemistry

Detecting Reactive Oxygen Species

JoVE 5654

Reactive oxygen species are chemically active, oxygen-derived molecules capable of oxidizing other molecules. Because of their reactive nature, there are many deleterious effects associated with unchecked ROS production, including structural damage to DNA and other biological molecules. However, ROS can also be mediators of physiological signaling. There is accumulating evidence that ROS play significant roles in everything from activation of transcription factors to the mediation of inflammatory toxicity that kills foreign pathogens and defend the body.In this video we will delve into the associations between ROS, metabolism and disease. After establishing their significance, we will discuss the principles and a protocol of a commonly used methodology for measuring ROS levels in cells: the use of non-fluorescent probes that become fluorescent upon oxidation. Lastly, we will review some current applications of this technique in cell biology research.


 Cell Biology

Decontamination for Laboratory Biosafety

JoVE 10399

Robert M. Rioux and Zhifeng Chen, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

Decontamination is essential for laboratory biosafety, as the accumulation of microbial contamination in the laboratory can lead to the transmission of disease. The degree of decontamination can be classified as either disinfection or sterilization. Disinfection aims to eliminate all pathogenic microorganisms, with the exception of bacterial spores on lab surfaces or equipment. Sterilization, on the other hand, aims to eliminate all microbial life. Different methods are available which include chemicals, heat, and radiation, and once again depend on the degree of decontamination, as well as the concentration of the contaminating microorganisms, presence of organic matter, and type of equipment or surface to be cleaned. Each method has its advantages and cautionary measures that need to be taken to avoid hazards.


 Lab Safety

Determining the Empirical Formula

JoVE 10181

Source: Laboratory of Dr. Neal Abrams - SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Determining the chemical formula of a compound is at the heart of what chemists do in the laboratory every day. Many tools are available to aid in this determination, but one of the simplest (and most accurate) is the determination of the empirical formula. Why is this useful? Because of the law of conservation of mass, any reaction can be followed gravimetrically, or by change in mass. The empirical formula provides the smallest whole-number ratio among elements (or compounds) within a molecular compound. In this experiment, gravimetric analysis will be used to determine the empirical formula of copper chloride hydrate, CuxCly·nH2O.


 General Chemistry

Isolating Nucleic Acids from Yeast

JoVE 5096

One of the many advantages to using yeast as a model system is that large quantities of biomacromolecules, including nucleic acids (DNA and RNA), can be purified from the cultured cells.

This video will address the steps required to carry out nucleic acid extraction. We will begin by briefly outlining the growth and harvest, and lysis of yeast cells, which are the initial steps common to the isolation of all biomacromolecules. Next, we will discuss two unique purification methods for the separation of nucleic acids: column binding and phase separation. Additionally, we will demonstrate several ways in which these methods are applied in the laboratory, including the preparation of nucleic acids for molecular biology techniques such as PCR and southern blotting, quantification of gene expression in response to environmental stimuli, and purification of large amounts of recombinant proteins.


 Biology I

Microfabrication via Photolithography

JoVE 5789

The fabrication of BioMEMs devices is often done using a microfabrication technique called photolithography. This widely used method utilizes light to transfer a pattern onto a silicon wafer, and provides the basis for the fabrication of many types of BioMEMs devices.

This video presents the photolithography technique, shows how the process is performed in the clean room, and introduces some applications of the process.


 Bioengineering

Isolation of Fecal Bacteria from Water Samples by Filtration

JoVE 10213

Source: Laboratories of Dr. Ian Pepper and Dr. Charles Gerba - Arizona University
Demonstrating Author: Luisa Ikner

The quality of water destined for use in agricultural, recreational, and domestic settings is of great importance due to the potential for outbreaks of waterborne disease. Microbial agents implicated in such events include parasites, bacteria, and viruses that are shed in high numbers in the feces of infected people and animals. Transmission to new and susceptible hosts may then occur via the fecal-oral route upon ingestion of contaminated water. Therefore, the ability to monitor water sources for the presence of pathogenic microorganisms is significant in order to ensure public health. Due to the sheer number and variety of potential fecal-oral pathogens that may be present in water and their variable concentrations, it is impractical and expensive to assay directly for each one of them on a regular basis. Therefore, the microbiological assays for water quality monitoring employ coliform indicator bacteria. Coliforms comprise, in part, the normal intestinal microflora of warm-blooded mammals, are non-pathogenic, and are consistently excreted in the feces. Therefore, the detection of coliform bacteria in water means that a fecal release occurred, and that harmful pathogenic m


 Environmental Microbiology

Ozonolysis of Alkenes

JoVE 10339

Source: Vy M. Dong and Zhiwei Chen, Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, CA

This experiment will demonstrate an example of an ozonolysis reaction to synthesize vanillin from isoeugenol (Figure 1). Ozonolysis of alkenes, an oxidation reaction between ozone and an alkene, is a common method to prepare aldehydes, ketones, and carboxylic acids. This experiment also demonstrates the use of an ozone generator and a low temperature (−78 °C) reaction. Figure 1. Diagram showing the ozonolysis of isoeugenol to vanillin.


 Organic Chemistry II

Lead Analysis of Soil Using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

JoVE 10021

Source: Laboratories of Margaret Workman and Kimberly Frye - Depaul University

Lead occurs naturally in soil, in levels ranging from 10-50 ppm. However, with the widespread use of lead in paint and gasoline in addition to contamination by industry, urban soils often have concentrations of lead significantly greater than background levels – up to 10,000 ppm in some places. Ongoing problems arise from the fact that lead does not biodegrade, and instead remains in the soil. Serious health risks are associated with lead poisoning, where children are particularly at risk. Millions of children in the U.S. are exposed to soil containing lead. This exposure can cause developmental and behavioral problems in children. These problems include learning disabilities, inattention, delayed growth, and brain damage. The Environmental Protection Agency has set a standard for lead in soil at 400 ppm for play areas and 1,200 ppm for non-play areas. Lead is also of concern in soil, when it’s used for gardening. Plants take up lead from the soil. Therefore, vegetables or herbs grown in contaminated soil can lead to lead poisoning. In addition, contaminated soil particles can be breathed in while gardening or brought into the house on clothing and footwear. It is recommended that s


 Environmental Science

Imaging Approaches to Assessments of Toxicological Oxidative Stress Using Genetically-encoded Fluorogenic Sensors

1Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 3Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

JoVE 56945


 Cancer Research

Sample Preparation for Analytical Characterization

JoVE 10205

Source: Laboratory of Dr. B. Jill Venton - University of Virginia

Sample preparation is the way in which a sample is treated to prepare for analysis. Careful sample preparation is critical in analytical chemistry to accurately generate either a standard or unknown sample for a chemical measurement. Errors in analytical chemistry methods are categorized as random or systematic. Random errors are errors due to change and are often due to noise in instrument. Systematic errors are due to investigator or instrumental bias, which introduces an offset in the measured value. Errors in sample preparation are systematic errors, which will propagate through analysis, causing uncertainty or inaccuracies through improper calibration curves. Systematic errors can be eliminated through correct sample preparation and proper use of the instrument. Poor sample preparation can also sometimes cause harm to the instrument.


 Analytical Chemistry

Real-Time DC-dynamic Biasing Method for Switching Time Improvement in Severely Underdamped Fringing-field Electrostatic MEMS Actuators

1Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Davis, 2Digital Light Projection (DLP) Technology Development, Texas Instruments, 3Birck Nanotechnology Center and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University

JoVE 51251


 Engineering

Imaging Metals in Brain Tissue by Laser Ablation - Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS)

1Elemental Bio-imaging Facility, University of Technology Sydney, 2Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, 3Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, 4School of Earth Sciences, The University of Melbourne, 5Research School, Ruhr University, 6Department of Physiology, Monash University, 7ESI Ltd., Bozeman, 8Agilent Technologies, Mulgrave

JoVE 55042


 Medicine

Examination of Rapid Dopamine Dynamics with Fast Scan Cyclic Voltammetry During Intra-oral Tastant Administration in Awake Rats

1Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program, Yale University, 2Department of Biotechnical and Clinical Laboratory Sciences, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, 3Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, 4Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Yale School of Medicine

JoVE 52468


 Behavior

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