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Intensive Care Units: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.

In Vitro Method to Control Concentrations of Halogenated Gases in Cultured Alveolar Epithelial Cells

1Department of Perioperative Medicine, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, 2Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique Unité Mixte de Recherche (CNRS UMR) 6293, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) U1103, Laboratoire de Génétique, Reproduction et Développement (GReD), Université Clermont Auvergne, 3Department of Pharmacology, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, 4Nurse Anesthetist School, CHU Clermont-Ferrand

JoVE 58554


 Medicine

Manual Muscle Testing: A Method of Measuring Extremity Muscle Strength Applied to Critically Ill Patients

1Outcomes After Critical Illness and Surgery (OACIS) Group, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, 2Critical Care Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Program, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 3Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Johns Hopkins University, 4Department of Rehabilitation Services, University of Maryland Medical System

JoVE 2632


 Medicine

The Portable Chemical Sterilizer (PCS), D-FENS, and D-FEND ALL: Novel Chlorine Dioxide Decontamination Technologies for the Military

1United States Army-Natick Soldier RD&E Center, Warfighter Directorate, 2Department of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, University of Connecticut Health Center, 3Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 4Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute

JoVE 4354


 Bioengineering

State of the Art Cranial Ultrasound Imaging in Neonates

1Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Erasmus MC-Sophia Children's Hospital, 2Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC-Sophia Children's Hospital, 3Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, UZ Brussel, 4Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Leiden University Medical Center, 5Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Isala Hospital, 6Department of Pediatrics, Koningin Paola Children's Hospital

JoVE 52238


 Medicine

Standardized Colon Ascendens Stent Peritonitis in Rats - a Simple, Feasible Animal Model to Induce Septic Acute Kidney Injury

1Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Center, 2Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care, University of Würzburg, 3Department of General, Visceral, Vascular and Paediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery I, University of Würzburg, 4Department of Internal Medicine I, Division of Nephrology, University Hospital Würzburg, 5Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, West Virginia University School of Medicine

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 54448


 JoVE In-Press

Esophageal Heat Transfer for Patient Temperature Control and Targeted Temperature Management

1Center for Advanced Design, Research, and Exploration, University of Illinois at Chicago, 2Attune Medical, 3University of Maryland School of Nursing, 4University of Western Ontario, 5University Medical Centre Maribor, 6University of Maryland, 7Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center

JoVE 56579


 Medicine

High-frequency Ultrasound Imaging of the Abdominal Aorta

JoVE 10397

Authors: Amelia R. Adelsperger, Evan H. Phillips, and Craig J. Goergen, Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana

High-frequency ultrasound systems are used to acquire high resolution images. Here, the use of a state-of-the-art system will be demonstrated to image the morphology and hemodynamics of small pulsatile arteries and veins found in mice and rats. Ultrasound is a relatively inexpensive, portable, and versatile method for the noninvasive assessment of vessels in humans as well as large and small animals. These are several key advantages that ultraound offers compared to other techniques, such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and near-infrared fluorescence tomography (NIRF). CT requires ionizing radiation and MRI can be prohibitively expensive and even impractical in some scenarios. NIRF, on the other hand, is limited by the penetration depth of light required to excite the fluorescent contrast agents. Ultrasound has limitations in terms of imaging depth; however, this may be overcome by sacrificing resolution and using a lower frequency transducer. Abdominal gas and excess body weight can severely diminish image quality. In the first case, the propagation of sound waves is limited, while in the lat


 Biomedical Engineering

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