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Intracranial Pressure: Pressure within the cranial cavity. It is influenced by brain mass, the circulatory system, Csf dynamics, and skull rigidity.

Automated Midline Shift and Intracranial Pressure Estimation based on Brain CT Images

1Department of Biostatistics, Virginia Commonwealth University, 2Virginia Commonwealth University Reanimation Engineering Science (VCURES) Center, 3Department of Computer Science, Virginia Commonwealth University, 4Department of Radiology, Virginia Commonwealth University, 5Department of Emergency Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University

JoVE 3871


 Medicine

The Rabbit Blood-shunt Model for the Study of Acute and Late Sequelae of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Technical Aspects

1Department of Intensive Care Medicine, University and Bern University Hospital (Inselspital), 2Department of Neurosurgery, Kantonsspital Aarau, 3Laboratories for Neuroscience Research in Neurosurgery, Boston Children's Hospital, 4Harvard Medical School, Boston Children's Hospital, 5Department of Neurosurgery, University and Bern University Hospital (Inselspital), 6Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Cologne, 7Institute of Pathology, Länggasse Bern

JoVE 52132


 Medicine

Modeling Astrocytoma Pathogenesis In Vitro and In Vivo Using Cortical Astrocytes or Neural Stem Cells from Conditional, Genetically Engineered Mice

1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, 2Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, 3Division of Neuropathology, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, 4Curriculum in Genetics and Molecular Biology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, 5Biological and Biomedical Sciences Program, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, 6Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, 7Department of Neurology, Neurosciences Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine

JoVE 51763


 Neuroscience

Cannula Implantation into the Cisterna Magna of Rodents

1Center for Translational Neuromedicine, Division of Glial Therapeutics, University of Copenhagen, 2Center for Translational Neuromedicine, Division of Glial Therapeutics, University of Rochester Medical Center, 3Department of Anesthesiology, Yale School of Medicine, 4Department of Experimental Medical Science, Wallenberg Center for Molecular Medicine, Lund University

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 57378


 JoVE In-Press

State of the Art Cranial Ultrasound Imaging in Neonates

1Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Erasmus MC-Sophia Children's Hospital, 2Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC-Sophia Children's Hospital, 3Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, UZ Brussel, 4Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Leiden University Medical Center, 5Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Isala Hospital, 6Department of Pediatrics, Koningin Paola Children's Hospital

JoVE 52238


 Medicine

Performing Permanent Distal Middle Cerebral with Common Carotid Artery Occlusion in Aged Rats to Study Cortical Ischemia with Sustained Disability

1Wolfson Centre for Age-Related Diseases, King's College London, University of London, 2Department of Neuroimaging, James Black Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, University of London, 3Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, Wellcome Surgical Institute, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, 4Research Service, Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital, 5Neurology Service, Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital, 6Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Neuroscience Research Institute, Loyola University Chicago, 7Department of Oncology, The Gray Institute for Radiation, Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford

JoVE 53106


 Medicine

Cranial Nerves Exam I (I-VI)

JoVE 10091

Source:Tracey A. Milligan, MD; Tamara B. Kaplan, MD; Neurology, Brigham and Women's/Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

During each section of the neurological testing, the examiner uses the powers of observation to assess the patient. In some cases, cranial nerve dysfunction is readily apparent: a patient might mention a characteristic chief complaint (such as loss of smell or diplopia), or a visually evident physical sign of cranial nerve involvement, such as in facial nerve palsy. However, in many cases a patient's history doesn't directly suggest cranial nerve pathologies, as some of them (such as sixth nerve palsy) may have subtle manifestations and can only be uncovered by a careful neurological exam. Importantly, a variety of pathological conditions that are associated with alterations in mental status (such as some neurodegenerative disorders or brain lesions) can also cause cranial nerve dysfunction; therefore, any abnormal findings during a mental status exam should prompt a careful and complete neurological exam. The cranial nerve examination is applied neuroanatomy. The cranial nerves are symmetrical; therefore, while performing the examination, the examiner should compare each side to the other. A physician should approach the examination in a


 Physical Examinations III

An Improved Method for Collection of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Anesthetized Mice

1Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Science, 2Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Science, 3Center of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, 4Sino-Danish Center for Education and Research (SDC), 5Department of Neurology, Xinhua Hospital Chongming Branch Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 6Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET-centre, Aarhus University Hospital

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56774


 JoVE In-Press

Lateral Fluid Percussion: Model of Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice

1Department of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 2Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research Center, 3Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center

JoVE 3063


 Neuroscience

Central Venous Catheter Insertion: Subclavian Vein

JoVE 10241

Source: James W Bonz, MD, Emergency Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

Central venous access is necessary in a multitude of clinical situations for hemodynamic monitoring, medication delivery, and blood sampling. There are three veins in the body that are accessed for central venous cannulation: the internal jugular, the subclavian, and the femoral vein. Central venous access via the subclavian vein has several advantages over other possible locations. The subclavian central venous catheter (CVC) placement is associated with lower infection and thrombosis rate than internal jugular and femoral CVC. Subclavian line can be placed quickly using anatomic landmarks and are often performed in trauma settings when cervical collars obliterate the access to the internal jugular (IJ) vein. The most significant disadvantage of the subclavian access is the risk of pneumothorax due to the anatomic proximity to the dome of the lung, which lies just superficial to the subclavian vein. In addition, in the event of an inadvertent arterial puncture, the access to the subclavian artery is impeded by the clavicle, which makes it difficult to effectively compress the vessel. Successful placement of the subclavian CVC requires good working understanding of the tar


 Emergency Medicine and Critical Care

Ophthalmoscopic Examination

JoVE 10146

Source: Richard Glickman-Simon, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, MA

The simplest ophthalmoscopes consist of an aperture to look through, a diopter indicator, and a disc for selecting lenses. The ophthalmoscope is primarily used to examine the fundus, or the inner wall of the posterior eye, which consists of the choroid, retina, fovea, macula, optic disc, and retinal vessels (Figure 1). The spherical eyeball collects and focuses light on the neurosensory cells of the retina. Light is refracted as it passes sequentially through the cornea, the lens, and the vitreous body. The first landmark observed during the funduscopic exam is the optic disc, which is where the optic nerve and retinal vessels enter the back of the eye (Figure 2). The disc usually contains a central whitish physiologic cup where the vessels enter; it normally occupies less than half the diameter of the entire disc. Just lateral and slightly inferior is the fovea, a darkened circular area that demarcates the point of central vision. Around this is the macula. A blind spot approximately 15° temporal to the line of gaze results from a lack of photoreceptor cells at the optic disc.

Live Imaging of the Ependymal Cilia in the Lateral Ventricles of the Mouse Brain

1Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, University of Toledo, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, 3Department of Biomedical & Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chapman University, School of Pharmacy, Rinker Health Science campus

JoVE 52853


 Neuroscience

In Vivo Tracking of Edema Development and Microvascular Pathology in a Model of Experimental Cerebral Malaria Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

1Department of Neuroradiology, Heidelberg University Hospital, 2Division of Experimental Radiology, Department of Neuroradiology, Heidelberg University Hospital, 3NeuroImaging Centre Research, Department of Neuroscience, Ruhr-University Bochum, 4Centre for Infectious Diseases, Parasitology Unit, Heidelberg University Hospital, 5German Centre for Infection Research (DZIF), 6Department of Neuroradiology, University of Würzburg, 7Center for Childhood and Adolescent Medicine, General Pediatrics, Heidelberg University Hospital

JoVE 55334


 Medicine

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