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Knee Joint:
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Measurement of Survival Time in Brachionus Rotifers: Synchronization of Maternal Conditions

1Department of Aquatic Bioscience, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 2School of Marine Biosciences, Department of Marine Biosciences, Kitasato University, 3Josephine Bay Paul Center for Comparative Molecular Biology and Evolution, Marine Biological Laboratory, 4School of Arts and Sciences, University of Houston-Victoria

JoVE 54126


 Biology

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Isolation and Culture of Dental Epithelial Stem Cells from the Adult Mouse Incisor

1Department of Orofacial Sciences and Program in Craniofacial and Mesenchymal Biology, University of California, San Francisco, 2Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, 3Department of Pathology and Research Center, Zhongshan Hospital of Dalian University, 4Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, UMR S872, 5Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, UMR S872, 6INSERM U872, 7Division of Endodontics, Department of Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, 8Department of Pediatrics and Institute for Human Genetics, University of California, San Francisco

JoVE 51266


 Biology

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Using the BLT Humanized Mouse as a Stem Cell based Gene Therapy Tumor Model

1Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 2UCLA AIDS Institute, 3Eli & Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA, 4Department of Medical and Molecular Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 5Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA

JoVE 4181


 Immunology and Infection

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Saliva, Salivary Gland, and Hemolymph Collection from Ixodes scapularis Ticks

1Microbiology and Pathogenesis Activity, Bacterial Diseases Branch, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2Tick-Borne Diseases Activity, Bacterial Diseases Branch, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

JoVE 3894


 Immunology and Infection

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Determining Spatial Orientation of Rock Layers with the Brunton Compass

JoVE 10086

Source: Laboratory of Alan Lester - University of Colorado Boulder

Most rock units exhibit some form of planar surfaces or linear features. Examples include bedding-, fault-, fracture-, and joint-surfaces, and various forms of foliation and mineral alignment. The spatial orientation of these features form the critical raw data used to constrain models addressing the origin and subsequent deformation of rock units. Although now over 100 years since its invention and introduction, the Brunton compass (Figure 1) remains a central tool in the modern geologist’s arsenal of field equipment. It is still the primary tool used to generate field data regarding the geometric orientation of planar rock surfaces or linear rock features. These orientation measurements are referred to as strike and dip, and provide the fundamental data for making geologic maps. Furthermore, the Brunton Compass can also function as a traditional compass for location exercises and triangulation. Finally, it can also serve as a pocket transit for measuring angular elevations. Figure 1. The Brunton compass.


 Earth Science

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Cardiac Exam II: Auscultation

JoVE 10124

Source: Suneel Dhand, MD, Attending Physician, Internal Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Proficiency in the use of a stethoscope to listen to heart sounds and the ability to differentiate between normal and abnormal heart sounds are essential skills for any physician. Correct placement of the stethoscope on the chest corresponds to the sound of cardiac valves closing. The heart has two main sounds: S1 and S2. The first heart sound (S1) occurs as the mitral and tricuspid valves (atrioventricular valves) close after blood enters the ventricles. This represents the start of systole. The second heart sound (S2) occurs when the aortic and pulmonary valves (semilunar valves) close after blood has left the ventricles to enter the systemic and pulmonary circulation systems at the end of systole. Traditionally, the sounds are known as a "lub-dub." Auscultation of the heart is performed using both diaphragm and bell parts of the stethoscope chest piece. The diaphragm is most commonly used and is best for high-frequency sounds (such as S1 and S2) and murmurs of mitral regurgitation and aortic stenosis. The diaphragm should be pressed firmly against the chest wall. The bell best transmits low-frequency sounds (such as S3 and S4) and the murmur of mitral stenosis. The bell should be applied


 Physical Examinations I

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Rotary Evaporation to Remove Solvent

JoVE 5501

Source: Dr. Melanie Pribisko Yen and Grace Tang — California Institute of Technology

Rotary evaporation is a technique most commonly used in organic chemistry to remove a solvent from a higher-boiling point compound of interest. The rotary evaporator, or "rotovap", was invented in 1950 by the chemist Lyman C. Craig. The primary use of a rotovap is to dry and purify samples for downstream applications. Its speed and ability to handle large volumes of solvent make rotary evaporation a preferred method of solvent removal in many laboratories, especially in instances involving low boiling point solvents.


 Organic Chemistry

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