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Maintenance: The upkeep of property or equipment.
 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Optimized Protocols for Mycobacterium leprae Strain Management: Frozen Stock Preservation and Maintenance in Athymic Nude Mice

1Department of Pathology, Instituto Lauro de Souza Lima (ILSL), 2Laboratory Animal House, Instituto Lauro de Souza Lima (ILSL), 3Department of Microbiology, Instituto Lauro de Souza Lima (ILSL), 4Department of Pharmacology, Instituto Lauro de Souza Lima (ILSL)


JoVE 50620

 Science Education: Essentials of Nursing Skills

Initiating Maintenance IV Fluids

JoVE Science Education

Source: Madeline Lassche, MSNEd, RN and Katie Baraki, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, University of Utah, UT

Hospitalized patients frequently require the administration of intravenous (IV) fluids to maintain their fluid and electrolyte balance. Certain medical conditions that preclude oral fluid intake may necessitate IV fluid administration, with or without electrolytes, to prevent hypovolemia, dehydration, and electrolyte imbalances. Pre-surgical and pre-procedure patients who require anesthesia are often required to be NPO (i.e., nil per os; Latin for "nothing by mouth") to prevent aspiration and to maintain hydration during the procedure. Post-surgical and post-procedure patients may also require IV fluid administration to increase intravascular volume following surgical blood loss. IV fluids can be delivered by different types of administrations sets: gravity flow infusion devices, which rely on gravitation force to push the fluid to the patient's bloodstream, or infusion pumps, which use a pump mechanism that generates positive pressure. While administering maintenance IV fluids using an infusion pump is the most common approach, facility policy; availability of infusion pump equipment; and other limitations, such as a power outage, may necessitate the use of IV gravity tub

 JoVE Biology

Regular Care and Maintenance of a Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Laboratory: An Introduction

1Centre of Excellence for Alzheimer's Disease Research and Care, School of Medical sciences, Edith Cowan University, 2Centre for Clinical Research in Neuropsychiatry, Graylands Hospital, University of Western Australia, 3McCusker Alzheimer's Research foundation, 4School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, 5Department of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Adelaide, 6School of Biomedical Sciences, Curtin University of Technology, 7School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, University of Western Australia


JoVE 4196

 Science Education: Essentials of Lab Animal Research

Anesthesia Induction and Maintenance

JoVE Science Education

Source: Kay Stewart, RVT, RLATG, CMAR; Valerie A. Schroeder, RVT, RLATG. University of Notre Dame, IN

The Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals ("The Guide") states that pain assessment and alleviation are integral components of the veterinary care of laboratory animals.1 The definition of anesthesia is the loss of feeling or sensation. It is a dynamic event involving changes in anesthetic depth with respect to an animal's metabolism, surgical stimulation, or variations in the external environment.

 Science Education: Essentials of Biology 1

Drosophila Maintenance

JoVE Science Education

Drosophila melanogaster, commonly known as fruit flies, are a frequently used model organism for life science research. Although starting a collection of these critters may seem as easy as leaving a banana on your kitchen counter for too long, a productive fly colony in the lab requires careful husbandry and maintenance.

This video demonstrates the necessary steps for maintaining a healthy fly stock. The overview begins with the preparation and storage of the yeast and sugar-containing media on which flies feed. Next, the vessels most commonly used for housing Drosophila are shown, as well as how and when to move flies between these containers. Finally, the presentation also includes examples of the ways in which housing and feeding conditions are manipulated for biological experiments.

 Science Education: Essentials of Biology 2

Basic Chick Care and Maintenance

JoVE Science Education

Chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus) are a valuable research tool, not only for studying important concepts in vertebrate development, neuroscience, and tumor biology, but also as an efficient system in which to propagate viruses. Although eggs can be purchased from external suppliers and working with chicks requires very little specialized equipment, an understanding of proper handling procedures is required for normal embryo development. This video will provide an overview of egg handling principles, including an explanation of the incubation parameters that can profoundly impact development: temperature, humidity, and egg rotation. Most experiments that use chicken eggs require access to the embryo within the shell, which is achieved by cutting a small, resealable hole, or “window.” This process is described in step-by-step detail, along with several other techniques essential for working with chicks, such as candling and India ink injection. Finally, the video will review some practical applications of these basic techniques in advanced scientific research.

 Science Education: Essentials of Biology 2

Zebrafish Maintenance and Husbandry

JoVE Science Education

The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a powerful vertebrate model system for studying development, modeling disease, and screening for novel therapeutics. Due to their small size, large numbers of zebrafish can be housed in the laboratory at low cost. Although zebrafish are relatively easy to maintain, special consideration must be given to both diet and water quality to in order to optimize fish health and reproductive success. This video will provide an overview of zebrafish husbandry and maintenance in the lab. After a brief review of the natural zebrafish habitat, techniques essential to recreating this environment in the lab will be discussed, including key elements of fish facility water recirculation systems and the preparation of brine shrimp as part of the zebrafish diet. Additionally, the presentation will include information on how specific zebrafish strains are tracked in a laboratory setting, with specific reference to the collection of tail fin samples for DNA extraction and genotyping. Finally, experimental modifications of the zebrafish environment will be discussed as a means to further our understanding of these fish, and in turn, ourselves.

 Science Education: Essentials of Biology 2

Basic Mouse Care and Maintenance

JoVE Science Education

Mice (Mus musculus) are small rodents that breed and sexually mature quickly, making them perfectly suited to generating large animal colonies for biological research. As compared to other mammalian species, mice are simple and inexpensive to maintain in the laboratory. Nevertheless, mouse colonies do have specific husbandry needs that are critical to preserving animal health and safety as well as experimental reproducibility. This video demonstrates standard practices that ensure mice are treated as humanely as possible within the laboratory animal facility, or vivarium. The discussion begins by reviewing a typical mouse housing setup, consisting of a plastic cage equipped with a layer of soft bedding and nesting material. The preformulated food pellets (also known as chow) that comprise the typical mouse diet are also introduced. In order to facilitate experiments performed on mice, safe animal handling practices are demonstrated, including common restraint techniques like “scruffing,” and the strategies used by researchers to keep track of individual mice within the facility. Finally, experimental manipulations of mouse housing and diet are discussed, in addition to one of the most common applications of the scruffing technique — performing injections.

 Science Education: Essentials of Biology 1

Yeast Maintenance

JoVE Science Education

Research performed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has significantly improved our understanding of important cellular phenomona such as regulation of the cell cycle, aging, and cell death. The many benefits of working with S. cerevisiae include the facts that they are inexpensive to grow in the lab and that many ready-to-use strains are now commercially available. Nevertheless, proper maintenance of this organism is critical for successful experiments. This video will provide an overview of how to grow and maintain S. cerevisiae in the lab. Basic concepts required for monitoring the proliferation of a yeast population, such as how to generate a growth curve using a spectrophotometer, are explained. This video also demonstrates the hands-on techniques required to maintain S. cerevisiae in the lab, including preparation of media, how to start a new culture of yeast cells, and how to store those cultures. Finally, the video shows off some of the ways these handling and maintenance techniques are applied in scientific research.

 Science Education: Essentials of Biology 1

C. elegans Maintenance

JoVE Science Education

Ceanorhabditis elegans has been, and is still, used to great success as a model organism for studying a variety of developmental, genetic, molecular and even physical phenomena. In order to use C. elegans to its full potential, proper care and attention to the basic maintenance of this powerful organism is essential.

In this video you will learn the basic housing and feeding requirements of C. elegans, how to correctly handle and manipulate worms using a worm pick and how to freeze and recover important worm stocks. Towards the end of the video we will visit a few applications of modifying the housing, feeding and manipulation of these important animals.

 JoVE In-Press

The C. elegans Intestine as a Model for Inter-cellular Lumen Morphogenesis and in Vivo polarized Membrane Biogenesis at the Single-cell Level

1Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center, Developmental Biology and Genetics Core, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 2College of Life Sciences, Jilin University, 3Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56100

 JoVE In-Press

The C. elegans Excretory Canal as a Model for Intracellular Lumen Morphogenesis and In Vivo Polarized Membrane Biogenesis in a Single Cell

1Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center, Developmental Biology and Genetics Core, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Harvard Medical School, 2College of Life Sciences, Jilin University, 3Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56101

 Science Education: Essentials of Nursing Skills

Preparing and Administering Secondary Intermittent Intravenous Medications

JoVE Science Education

Source: Madeline Lassche, MSNEd, RN and Katie Baraki, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, University of Utah, UT

Secondary intravenous (IV) infusions are a way to administer smaller volume-controlled amounts of IV solution (25-250 mL). Secondary IV infusions are delivered over longer periods of time than IV push medications, which reduces the risks associated with rapid infusions, such as phlebitis and infiltration. In addition, some antibiotic medications are only stable for a limited time in solution. The secondary IV medication tubing is connected to the primary macrobore (large internal diameter) IV tubing and is therefore "secondary" to the primary infusion. The secondary solution bag is typically hung higher than the primary infusion bag and is subsequently "piggybacked" on top of the primary IV infusion. This higher position places greater gravitational pressure on the secondary IV solution. As a result, the primary infusion is temporarily paused until the secondary infusion volume has been delivered. This approach ensures that the medication is completely infused due to an immediate return of maintenance IV infusion in the IV line. The secondary IV infusion can be safely delivered when the patient's fluid volume status permits temporarily pausing the delivery of maintenance fluid and in hype

 JoVE Biology

High Efficiency Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells to Cardiomyocytes and Characterization by Flow Cytometry

1Department of Biochemistry, Medical College of Wisconsin, 2Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, 3Department of Anesthesiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, 4Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Consortium, LKS Faculty of Medicine, Hong Kong University, 5Division of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 6Cardiovascular Research Center, Biotechnology and Bioengineering Center, Medical College of Wisconsin


JoVE 52010

 Science Education: Essentials of Nursing Skills

Assessing and Flushing a Peripheral Intravenous Line

JoVE Science Education

Source: Madeline Lassche, MSNEd, RN and Katie Baraki, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, University of Utah, UT

After peripheral intravenous (IV) access is initiated, it is important to assess and maintain the IV catheter according to institutional policies and nursing standards of practice. The regular assessment of the insertion site and the surrounding areas for signs of complications is necessary to prevent IV catheter complications, including infiltration, phlebitis, infection, extravasation, or catheter dislodgement. Routine IV maintenance is equally important to preserve line patency and to reduce the risk of occlusion, thrombosis, and thrombophlebitis. According to the CDC, peripheral IV catheters (PIV) may be kept in place for as long as 96 h, with proper care and maintenance. In addition, according to the Infusion Nurses Society (INS), a pediatric patient IV catheter may be kept in place until the IV line is no longer patent or it demonstrates complications. Routine rotation every 96 h is not indicated in the pediatric population due to increased anxiety caused by needle sticks. This video demonstrates the assessment and maintenance of peripheral IV lines, including general considerations before initiating the procedure, assessing the injection site for associated complications, and ma

 Science Education: Essentials of Nursing Skills

Preparing and Administering Intermittent Intravenous Medications with an Infusion Pump

JoVE Science Education

Source: Madeline Lassche, MSNEd, RN and Katie Baraki, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, University of Utah, UT

Primary intermittent intravenous (IV) infusions are delivered alone as volume-controlled infusions, while secondary infusions are delivered with another IV fluid, usually maintenance fluids. Intermittent infusions are delivered over a specific amount of time, which is dictated by the type of medication, such as IV antibiotics. High-volume IV medications, anywhere from 50- to 500-mL infusions, are typically delivered using an infusion pump as either primary or secondary infusions. Infusion pumps deliver IV fluids in a volume-controlled manner, keeping medication side effects to a minimum and helping to prevent nurse medication errors. Careful review of the medication compatibility with maintenance fluids using an approved medication drug guide, pharmacy recommendations in the Medication Administration Record (MAR), and physician orders must be assessed prior to delivering an IV medication. This review will determine if primary or secondary delivery is appropriate based on the risk for patient harm, such as for concentrated electrolyte preparations like potassium. Certain medical conditions that preclude oral fluid intake, specific medication preparations, or situations that require an inc

 JoVE Developmental Biology

Automated Quantification of Hematopoietic Cell – Stromal Cell Interactions in Histological Images of Undecalcified Bone

1Immunodynamics, German Rheumatism Research Center, a Leibniz Institute, 2Biophysical Analytics, German Rheumatism Research Center, a Leibniz Institute, 3Max-Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, 4Wimasis GmbH, 5Immunodynamics and Intravital Imaging, Charité - University of Medicine


JoVE 52544

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