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Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of Electrons with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In Transmission electron microscopy the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In Scanning electron microscopy an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.
 JoVE Bioengineering

From Voxels to Knowledge: A Practical Guide to the Segmentation of Complex Electron Microscopy 3D-Data

1Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 2Joint Bioenergy Institute, Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 3National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory


JoVE 51673

 JoVE Bioengineering

Correlative Light- and Electron Microscopy Using Quantum Dot Nanoparticles

1South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, 2School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, 3Correlative Microscopy Group, Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, 4Electron Microscopy Laboratory, Department of Anatomical Pathology, Sydney South West Pathology Service, New South Wales Health Pathology, 5School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia


JoVE 54307

 JoVE Biology

Characterization of Calcification Events Using Live Optical and Electron Microscopy Techniques in a Marine Tubeworm

1Department of Biological Sciences, Clemson University, 2Department of Marine Biodiversity Research (BioDive), Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), 3Advanced Material Research Laboratory (AMRL), Clemson University, 4Swire Institute of Marine Sciences and School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong


JoVE 55164

 JoVE Biology

Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) Protocols for Problematic Plant, Oomycete, and Fungal Samples

1Biodiversity and Conservation Department, Real Jardín Botánico, CSIC, 2Research Support Unit, Real Jardín Botánico, CSIC, 3Mycology Department, Real Jardín Botánico, CSIC, 4Division of Glycoscience, AlbaNova University Center, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH)


JoVE 55031

 JoVE In-Press

Correlative Super-Resolution and Electron Microscopy to Resolve Protein Localization in Zebrafish Retina

1Center for Microscopy and Image Analysis, University of Zurich, 2Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, University of Zurich, 3Institute for Medical Genetics, University of Zurich

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56113

 JoVE Biology

Scanning Electron Microscopy of Macerated Tissue to Visualize the Extracellular Matrix

1Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 2Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 3Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 4Cardiovascular Institute, Maine Medical Center


JoVE 54005

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

A New Method for Qualitative Multi-scale Analysis of Bacterial Biofilms on Filamentous Fungal Colonies Using Confocal and Electron Microscopy

1Interactions Arbres – Microorganismes, UMR1136, INRA Université de Lorraine, 2Ecologie et Ecophysiologie Forestières - PTEF, UMR 1137, INRA Université de Lorraine, 3Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory


JoVE 54771

 Science Education: Essentials of Analytical Chemistry

Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM)

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratory of Dr. Andrew J. Steckl — University of Cincinnati

A scanning electron microscope, or SEM, is a powerful microscope that uses electrons to form an image. It allows for imaging of conductive samples at magnifications that cannot be achieved using traditional microscopes. Modern light microscopes can achieve a magnification of ~1,000X, while typical SEM can reach magnifications of more than 30,000X. Because the SEM doesn’t use light to create images, the resulting pictures it forms are in black and white.  Conductive samples are loaded onto the SEM’s sample stage. Once the sample chamber reaches vacuum, the user will proceed to align the electron gun in the system to the proper location. The electron gun shoots out a beam of high-energy electrons, which travel through a combination of lenses and apertures and eventually hit the sample. As the electron gun continues to shoot electrons at a precise position on the sample, secondary electrons will bounce off of the sample. These secondary electrons are identified by the detector. The signal found from the secondary electrons is amplified and sent to the monitor, creating a 3D image. This video will demonstrate SEM sample preparation, operation, and imaging capabilities.

 JoVE Neuroscience

Preparation of Primary Neurons for Visualizing Neurites in a Frozen-hydrated State Using Cryo-Electron Tomography

1Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Baylor College of Medicine, 2Department of Neuroscience, Baylor College of Medicine, 3Department of Neuroscience, University of California at San Diego, 4National Center for Macromolecular Imaging, Verna and Marrs McLean Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine


JoVE 50783

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