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 JoVE Biology

Preparation, Imaging, and Quantification of Bacterial Surface Motility Assays

1Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 2Eck Institute for Global Health, University of Notre Dame, 3Department of Applied and Computational Mathematics and Statistics, University of Notre Dame, 4INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, 5Department of Biology, Indiana University, 6Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame


JoVE 52338

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

A Quantitative Evaluation of Cell Migration by the Phagokinetic Track Motility Assay

1Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, 2Center for Molecular and Tumor Virology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, 3Department of Microbiology and Immunology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, 4Feist-Weiller Cancer Center, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center


JoVE 4165

 JoVE Biology

Assessing Neural Stem Cell Motility Using an Agarose Gel-based Microfluidic Device

1Biomedical Engineering Department, Cornell University, 2Neurosurgical Laboratory for Translational Stem Cell Research, Weill Cornell Brain Tumor Center, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, 3Cell Morphology Department, Instituto de Investigacion Principe Felipe, 4Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Cornell University


JoVE 674

 Science Education: Essentials of Cell Biology

An Introduction to Cell Motility and Migration

JoVE Science Education

Cell motility and migration play important roles in both normal biology and in disease. On one hand, migration allows cells to generate complex tissues and organs during development, but on the other hand, the same mechanisms are used by tumor cells to move and spread in a process known as cancer metastasis. One of the primary cellular machineries that make cell movement possible is an intracellular network of myosin and actin molecules, together known as “actomyosin”, which creates a contractile force to pull a cell in different directions.In this video, JoVE presents a historical overview of the field of cell migration, noting how early work on muscle contraction led to the discovery of the actomyosin apparatus. We then explore some of the questions researchers are still asking about cell motility, and review techniques used to study different aspects of this phenomenon. Finally, we look at how researchers are currently studying cell migration, for example, to better understand metastasis.

 JoVE In-Press

Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops Truncatus) Spermatozoa: Collection, Cryopreservation, and Heterologous In Vitro Fertilization

1Department of Animal Reproduction, Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraria y Alimentaria (INIA), 2Department of Animal Medicine and Surgery, School of Veterinary Medicine, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 3Department of Physiology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Murcia, Campus Mare Nostrum, 4Mundomar, Benidorm, 5Veterinary Services, L'Oceanográfic, Ciudad de las Artes y las Ciencias, Junta de Murs i Vals, s/n, 46013

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 55237

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Radial Mobility and Cytotoxic Function of Retroviral Replicating Vector Transduced, Non-adherent Alloresponsive T Lymphocytes

1Department of Neurosurgery, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, 2Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, 3Department of Medicine, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, 4Brain Research Institute, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, 5Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine


JoVE 52416

 JoVE Medicine

Extended Time-lapse Intravital Imaging of Real-time Multicellular Dynamics in the Tumor Microenvironment

1Department of Anatomy & Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 2Department of Radiology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 3Gruss-Lipper Biophotonics Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 4Integrated Imaging Program, Albert Einstein College of Medicine


JoVE 54042

 JoVE In-Press

Ex Vivo Imaging of Resident CD8 T Lymphocytes in Human Lung Tumor Slices Using Confocal Microscopy

1Institut Cochin, Inserm U1016-CNRS UMR8104, Université Paris Descartes, 2Department of Pathology, Paris Centre University Hospitals, Université Paris Descartes, 3INSERM U1138, Cancer and Immune Escape, Cordeliers Research Center, University Pierre and Marie Curie, 4Department of Thoracic Surgery, Paris Centre University Hospitals, University Paris Descartes

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 55709

 JoVE Biology

Measuring Intracellular Ca2+ Changes in Human Sperm using Four Techniques: Conventional Fluorometry, Stopped Flow Fluorometry, Flow Cytometry and Single Cell Imaging

1Departamento de Genética del Desarrollo y Fisiología Molecular, Instituto de Biotecnología-Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 2Math and Sciences Department, Edison State College


JoVE 50344

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Long Term Intravital Multiphoton Microscopy Imaging of Immune Cells in Healthy and Diseased Liver Using CXCR6.Gfp Reporter Mice

1Department of Medicine III, RWTH University-Hospital Aachen, 2IZKF Aachen Core Facility "Two-Photon Imaging", RWTH University-Hospital Aachen, 3Institute for Laboratory Animal Science & Experimental Surgery, RWTH Aachen University, 4Institute for Pharmacology, RWTH University-Hospital Aachen


JoVE 52607

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