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Mucus: The viscous secretion of mucous membranes. It contains mucin, white blood cells, water, inorganic salts, and exfoliated cells.

Human Lung Dendritic Cells: Spatial Distribution and Phenotypic Identification in Endobronchial Biopsies Using Immunohistochemistry and Flow Cytometry

1Immunology and Allergy Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, 2Division of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, 3Divison of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Umeå University

JoVE 55222


 Immunology and Infection

Culturing of Human Nasal Epithelial Cells at the Air Liquid Interface

1Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2Department of Pediatrics, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 3Pulmonary Diseases and Critical Care, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 4Curriculum in Toxicology, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

JoVE 50646


 Biology

Fabrication and Characterization of Griffithsin-modified Fiber Scaffolds for Prevention of Sexually Transmitted Infections

1Department of Chemistry, University of Louisville, 2Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville, 3Center for Predictive Medicine, University of Louisville, 4Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Louisville, 5Department of Bioengineering, University of Louisville

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56492


 JoVE In-Press

Colorectal Cancer Cell Surface Protein Profiling Using an Antibody Microarray and Fluorescence Multiplexing

1School of Molecular Bioscience, University of Sydney, 2Department of Surgery, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, 3Department of Anatomical Pathology, Department of Anatomical Pathology, 4Department of Medicine, Concord Repatriation General Hospital

JoVE 3322


 Immunology and Infection

Optical Frequency Domain Imaging of Ex vivo Pulmonary Resection Specimens: Obtaining One to One Image to Histopathology Correlation

1Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, 2Massachusetts General Hospital, 3Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Harvard Medical School, 4Pulmonary and Critical Care Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, 5Pulmonary and Critical Care Unit, Harvard Medical School

JoVE 3855


 Bioengineering

Experimental Human Pneumococcal Carriage

1Respiratory Infection Group, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, 2Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen, University Hospital Trust, 3Comprehensive Local Research Network, 4NIHR Biomedical Research Centre in Microbial Diseases, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust, 5Institute of Lung Health, Respiratory Biomedical Unit, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust & University of Leicester, 6Department of Clinical Infection Microbiology & Immunology, Institute of Infection & Global Health, University of Liverpool

JoVE 50115


 Medicine

Derivation of Glial Restricted Precursors from E13 mice

1Hugo W. Moser Research Institute at Kennedy Krieger, Johns Hopkins University, 2Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 3University of Maryland, 4Experimental Neurology, Biogen Idec, 5The Brain Science Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 6Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

JoVE 3462


 Neuroscience

Co-culture of Living Microbiome with Microengineered Human Intestinal Villi in a Gut-on-a-Chip Microfluidic Device

1Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 2Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, 3Vascular Biology Program, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 4John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University

JoVE 54344


 Bioengineering

Discontinuing Intravenous Fluids and a Peripheral Intravenous Line

JoVE 10278

Source: Madeline Lassche, MSNEd, RN and Katie Baraki, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, University of Utah, UT

Intravenous (IV) fluid administration and peripheral IV catheters (PIVs) may be discontinued for a number of reasons. The most common reason for discontinuing IV fluids is that the patient has returned to normal body fluid volume (euvolemia) and is able to maintain adequate oral fluid intake or is being discharged from the hospital. In addition, the Centers for Disease Control Guidelines for the Prevention of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections (2011) recommends replacing PIVs every 72-96 h in adults to prevent the risk of infection or phlebitis. If the PIV becomes dislodged or if the insertion site demonstrates the signs and symptoms of infection, infiltration, extravasation, or phlebitis, the PIV should be discontinued and replaced. For pediatric patients, the Infusion Nurses Society recommends replacing the PIV only when the IV infusion site is no longer patent or when it demonstrates the signs and symptoms of complications. This video describes the approach to discontinue IV fluid administration and PIVs.


 Nursing Skills

Preparing and Administering Oral Tablet and Liquid Medications

JoVE 10258

Source: Madeline Lassche, MSNEd, RN and Katie Baraki, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, University of Utah, UT

Oral medications are the route most preferred by patients and are one of the most commonly used routes of medication administration by providers. Most oral preparations are taken by mouth, swallowed with fluid, and absorbed via the gastrointestinal tract. Oral medications are available in solid forms (e.g., tablets, capsules, caplets, and enteric-coated tablets) and liquids forms (e.g., syrups, elixirs, spirits, and suspensions). Most oral medications have a slower onset of action and, in the case of liquids and swallowed oral medications, may also have a more prolonged effect. Enteric-coated tablets are covered with material that prevents dissolution and absorption until the tablet reaches the small intestine. Additional oral medication routes (not shown in this video) include sublingual administration, in which the preparation is placed under the tongue to dissolve, and buccal administration, which involves placing the medication in the cheek area between the gums and mucus membranes to dissolve. When preparing and administering oral tablets and liquid medications, the nurse must consider whether the medication is appropriate given the patient's medical conditi


 Nursing Skills

Analyzing Beneficial Effects of Nutritional Supplements on Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Functions During Experimental Colitis

1Department of Molecular Biomedicine, Center for Research and Advanced Studies of the National Polytechnic Institute, 2Department of Physiology, Biophysics and Neurosciences, Center for Research and Advanced Studies of the National Polytechnic Institute, 3Department of Infectomics and Molecular Pathogenesis, Center for Research and Advanced Studies of the National Polytechnic Institute

JoVE 55095


 Medicine

Bronchoalveolar Lavage (BAL) for Research; Obtaining Adequate Sample Yield

1Biomedical Research Centre in Microbial Diseases, National Institute for Health Research, 2Respiratory Infection Group, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospital Trust, 3Respiratory Infection Group, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, 4Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool, 5Comprehensive Local Research Network, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospital Trust, 6Department of Respiratory Research, University Hospital Aintree

JoVE 4345


 Medicine

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