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Multiple Sclerosis: An autoimmune disorder mainly affecting young adults and characterized by destruction of myelin in the central nervous system. Pathologic findings include multiple sharply demarcated areas of demyelination throughout the white matter of the central nervous system. Clinical manifestations include visual loss, extra-ocular movement disorders, paresthesias, loss of sensation, weakness, dysarthria, spasticity, ataxia, and bladder dysfunction. The usual pattern is one of recurrent attacks followed by partial recovery (see Multiple sclerosis, Relapsing-remitting), but acute fulminating and chronic progressive forms (see Multiple sclerosis, Chronic progressive) also occur. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p903)

Comprehensive Autopsy Program for Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis

1Department of Neurosciences, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, 3Mellen Center for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis, Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic

JoVE 59511

 Neuroscience

Adapted Resistance Training Improves Strength in Eight Weeks in Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis

1Motion Analysis Laboratory, Kennedy Krieger Institute, 2Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 3Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 4Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

JoVE 53449

 Medicine

Long-term Potentiation

JoVE 10846

Long-term potentiation, or LTP, is one of the ways by which synaptic plasticity—changes in the strength of chemical synapses—can occur in the brain. LTP is the process of synaptic strengthening that occurs over time between pre- and postsynaptic neuronal connections. The synaptic strengthening of LTP works in opposition to the synaptic weakening of long-term depression (LTD) and together are the main mechanisms that underlie learning and memory. LTP can occur when presynaptic neurons repeatedly fire and stimulate the postsynaptic neuron. This is called Hebbian LTP since it follows from Donald Hebb’s 1949 postulate that “neurons that fire together wire together.” The repeated stimulation from presynaptic neurons induces changes in the type and number of ion channels in the postsynaptic membrane. Two types of postsynaptic receptors of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate are involved in LTP: 1) N-methyl-D-aspartate or NMDA receptors and 2) α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid or AMPA receptors. Although NMDA receptors open upon glutamate binding, their pore is usually blocked by magnesium ions that prevent other positively charged ions from entering the neuron. However, glutamate released from presynaptic neurons can bind to postsynaptic AMPA receptors, causing an influx of sodium ions that results

 Core: Nervous System

Glial Cells

JoVE 10843

Glial cells are one of the two main types of cells in the nervous system. Glia cells comprise astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia, and ependymal cells in the central nervous system, and satellite and Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system. These cells do not communicate via electrical signals like neurons do, but they contribute to virtually every other aspect of nervous system function. In humans, the number of glial cells is roughly equal to the number of neurons in the brain. Glia in the central nervous system (CNS) include astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia, and ependymal cells. Astrocytes are the most abundant type of glial cell and are found in organized, non-overlapping patterns throughout the brain, where they closely associate with neurons and capillaries. Astrocytes play numerous roles in brain function, including regulating blood flow and metabolic processes, synaptic ion and pH homeostasis, and blood-brain barrier maintenance. Another specialized glial cell, the oligodendrocyte, forms the myelin sheath that surrounds neuronal axons in the CNS. Oligodendrocytes extend long cellular processes that wrap around axons multiple times to form this coating. Myelin sheath is required for proper conduction of neuronal signaling and greatly increases the speed at which these messages travel. Microglia—known as the macrop

 Core: Nervous System

The Blood-brain Barrier

JoVE 10841

The blood-brain barrier (BBB) refers to the specialized vasculature that provides the brain with nutrients in the blood while strictly regulating the movement of ions, molecules, pathogens, and other substances. It is composed of tightly linked endothelial cells on one side and astrocyte projections on the other. Together they provide a semipermeable barrier that protects the brain and poses unique challenges to the delivery of therapeutics. The BBB is made up of a variety of cellular components, including endothelial cells and astrocytes. These cells share a common basement membrane and together regulate the passage of components between the circulation and the interstitial fluid surrounding the brain. The first type of cellular component, specialized endothelial cells, make up the walls of the cerebral capillaries. They are connected by extremely tight and complex intercellular junctions. These junctions create a selective physical barrier, preventing simple diffusion of most substances, including average to large-sized molecules such as glucose and insulin. A second cell type, astrocytes, are a type of glial cell of the central nervous system which influences endothelial cell function, blood flow, and ion balance in the brain through interaction and close association with cerebral vasculature. They provide a direct link between the vasculature

 Core: Nervous System

Cranial Nerves Exam II (VII-XII)

JoVE 10005

Source:Tracey A. Milligan, MD; Tamara B. Kaplan, MD; Neurology, Brigham and Women's/Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA


The cranial nerve examination follows the mental status evaluation in a neurological exam. However, the examination begins with observations made upon greeting…

 Physical Examinations III

Cranial Nerves Exam I (I-VI)

JoVE 10091

Source:Tracey A. Milligan, MD; Tamara B. Kaplan, MD; Neurology, Brigham and Women's/Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA


During each section of the neurological testing, the examiner uses the powers of observation to assess the patient. In some cases, cranial nerve dysfunction is readily apparent: a patient might…

 Physical Examinations III

Motor Exam II

JoVE 10095

Source:Tracey A. Milligan, MD; Tamara B. Kaplan, MD; Neurology, Brigham and Women's/Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA


There are two main types of reflexes that are tested on a neurological examination: stretch (or deep tendon reflexes) and superficial reflexes. A deep tendon…

 Physical Examinations III

An Introduction to Stem Cell Biology

JoVE 5331

Cells that can differentiate into a variety of cell types, known as stem cells, are at the center of one of the most exciting fields of science today. Stem cell biologists are working to understand the basic mechanisms that regulate how these cells function. These researchers are also interested in harnessing the remarkable potential of stem cells to treat human diseases.


Here,…

 Developmental Biology

Compound Administration I

JoVE 10198

Source: Kay Stewart, RVT, RLATG, CMAR; Valerie A. Schroeder, RVT, RLATG. University of Notre Dame, IN


As many research protocols require that a substance be injected into an animal, the route of delivery and the amount of the substance must be accurately determined. There are several routes of administration available in the mouse and rat. …

 Lab Animal Research

Ophthalmoscopic Examination

JoVE 10146

Source: Richard Glickman-Simon, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, MA


The simplest ophthalmoscopes consist of an aperture to look through, a diopter indicator, and a disc for selecting lenses. The ophthalmoscope is primarily used to examine the fundus, or the…

 Physical Examinations II

Selecting Multiple Biomarker Subsets with Similarly Effective Binary Classification Performances

1College of Computer Science and Technology, and Key Laboratory of Symbolic Computation and Knowledge Engineering of Ministry of Education, Jilin University, 2College of Software, Jilin University, 3Ultrasonography Department, China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, 4Department of Pathogenobiology, College of Basic Medical Science, Jilin University

JoVE 57738

 Cancer Research

Antibody Binding Specificity for Kappa (Vκ) Light Chain-containing Human (IgM) Antibodies: Polysialic Acid (PSA) Attached to NCAM as a Case Study

1Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, 2Mayo Clinic Center for Multiple Sclerosis and Autoimmune Neurology, Mayo Clinic, 3Center for Regenerative Medicine, Neuroregeneration, Mayo Clinic, 4Division of Neonatal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 5Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic

JoVE 54139

 Immunology and Infection

Determining Immune System Suppression versus CNS Protection for Pharmacological Interventions in Autoimmune Demyelination

1Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 2Department of Pathology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 3Department of Neurobiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 4Center for Glial Biology and Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham

JoVE 54348

 Immunology and Infection

Induction of Paralysis and Visual System Injury in Mice by T Cells Specific for Neuromyelitis Optica Autoantigen Aquaporin-4

1Department of Neurology, University of California, 2Program in Immunology, University of California, 3Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, 4Department of Pathology, Stanford University

JoVE 56185

 Immunology and Infection

Using Retinal Imaging to Study Dementia

1Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2Department of Medicine & Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 3Therese Pei Fong Chow Research Centre for Prevention of Dementia, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 4Gerald Choa Neuroscience Centre, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 5Memory Aging and Cognition Centre, National University Health System, 6Department of Pharmacology, National University of Singapore, 7Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore National Eye Centre, 8Duke-NUS Medical School, National University of Singapore

JoVE 56137

 Medicine

Utilizing 3D Printing Technology to Merge MRI with Histology: A Protocol for Brain Sectioning

1Translational Neuroradiology Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, 2Cerebral Microcirculation Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, 3Viral Immunology Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

JoVE 54780

 Neuroscience

Characterizing Multiscale Mechanical Properties of Brain Tissue Using Atomic Force Microscopy, Impact Indentation, and Rheometry

1Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 3Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 4Department of Neurology, The F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School

JoVE 54201

 Neuroscience

Derivation of Glial Restricted Precursors from E13 mice

1Hugo W. Moser Research Institute at Kennedy Krieger, Johns Hopkins University, 2Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 3University of Maryland, 4Experimental Neurology, Biogen Idec, 5The Brain Science Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 6Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

JoVE 3462

 Neuroscience

Development and Validation of an Ultrasensitive Single Molecule Array Digital Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay for Human Interferon-α

1Immunobiology of Dendritic Cells, Institut Pasteur, 2INSERM U1223, 3Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Neuroinflammation, INSERM UMR1163, Institut Imagine, 4MRC Human Genetics Unit, MRC Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, 5Manchester Centre for Genomic Medicine, University of Manchester

JoVE 57421

 Immunology and Infection

Rapid Fractionation and Isolation of Whole Blood Components in Samples Obtained from a Community-based Setting

1Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 3Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, 4Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 5Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 6Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 7Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Wayne State University School of Medicine

JoVE 52227

 Medicine

Enhanced Genome Editing with Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein in Diverse Cells and Organisms

1Department of Molecular Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, 2Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, Berkeley, 3Innovative Genomics Institute, University of California, Berkeley, 4Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program, University of California, San Francisco, 5Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of California, San Francisco, 6Diabetes Center, University of California, San Francisco, 7Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, 8Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, 9UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, 10Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley

JoVE 57350

 Genetics

Bilateral Assessment of the Corticospinal Pathways of the Ankle Muscles Using Navigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

1Department of Neurology, New York University School of Medicine, 2Department of Health Sciences and Research, Medical University of South Carolina, 3Department of Physical Therapy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, 4Department of Health Professions, Medical University of South Carolina, 5Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, 6Department of Psychiatry, Medical University of South Carolina, 7Division of Physical Therapy, Medical University of South Carolina

JoVE 58944

 Neuroscience
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