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Muscle Relaxation: That phase of a muscle twitch during which a muscle returns to a resting position.

Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Skeletal Muscle Disease

1Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, 2Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, 4Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University, 5Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vanderbilt University, 6Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University

JoVE 52352


 Medicine

Evaluation of Vascular Control Mechanisms Utilizing Video Microscopy of Isolated Resistance Arteries of Rats

1Department of Physical Therapy, Marquette University, 2Medical College of Wisconsin, 3Department of Physiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, 4Graduate Programs of Nurse Anesthesia, Texas Wesleyan University, 5Office of Research, Medical College of Wisconsin

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56133


 JoVE In-Press

Contractility Measurements of Human Uterine Smooth Muscle to Aid Drug Development

1Harris-Wellbeing Preterm Birth Research Centre, Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, 2School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Queensland, 3Faculty of Chemistry, Institute of Biological Chemistry, University of Vienna, 4Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, 5Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56639


 JoVE In-Press

Motor Exam II

JoVE 10095

Source:Tracey A. Milligan, MD; Tamara B. Kaplan, MD; Neurology, Brigham and Women's/Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

There are two main types of reflexes that are tested on a neurological examination: stretch (or deep tendon reflexes) and superficial reflexes. A deep tendon reflex (DTR) results from the stimulation of a stretch-sensitive afferent from a neuromuscular spindle, which, via a single synapse, stimulates a motor nerve leading to a muscle contraction. DTRs are increased in chronic upper motor neuron lesions (lesions of the pyramidal tract) and decreased in lower motor neuron lesions and nerve and muscle disorders. There is a wide variation of responses and reflexes graded from 0 to 4+ (Table 1). DTRs are commonly tested to help localize neurologic disorders. A common method of recording findings during the DTR examination is using a stick figure diagram. The DTR test can help distinguish upper and lower motor neuron problems, and can assist in localizing nerve root compression as well. Although the DTR of nearly any skeletal muscle could be tested, the reflexes that are routinely tested are: brachioradialis, biceps, triceps, patellar, and Achilles (Table 2). Superficial reflexes are segmental ref


 Physical Examinations III

Combined Intravital Microscopy and Contrast-enhanced Ultrasonography of the Mouse Hindlimb to Study Insulin-induced Vasodilation and Muscle Perfusion

1Laboratory for Physiology, Institute for Cardiovascular Research (ICaR-VU), VU University Medical Center, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Institute for Cardiovascular Research (ICaR-VU), VU University Medical Center

JoVE 54912


 Medicine

Myo-mechanical Analysis of Isolated Skeletal Muscle

1Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California San Francisco, 2Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Francisco, 3Department of Biology, San Francisco State University, 4Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, 5Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine & Stem Cell Research, University of California San Francisco

JoVE 2582


 Medicine

Hyperpolarized 13C Metabolic Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Imaging

1Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, 2Department of Chemistry, Technische Universität München, 3GE Global Research, 4Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik der Technischen Universität München (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, 5Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging (IBMI), Helmholtz Zentrum München, 6IDG Institute of Developmental Genetics, Helmholtz Zentrum München

JoVE 54751


 Cancer Research

3D Ultrasound Imaging: Fast and Cost-effective Morphometry of Musculoskeletal Tissue

1Laboratory for Myology, Department of Human Movement Sciences, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam Movement Sciences, 2Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam Movement Sciences

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 55943


 JoVE In-Press

Mesenteric Artery Contraction and Relaxation Studies Using Automated Wire Myography

1Julius L. Chambers Biomedical/Biotechnology Research Institute, North Carolina Central University, Durham, 2Department of Biology, North Carolina Central University, Durham, 3Department of Physiology & Pharmacology and Hypertension & Vascular Research Center, Wake Forest University School of Medicine

JoVE 3119


 Medicine

A Community-Based Stress Management Program: Using Wearable Devices to Assess Whole Body Physiological Responses in Non-Laboratory Settings

1Department of Emergency Medicine, The University of Texas Health Science Center, 2Department of Integrative Physiology, The University of North Texas Health Science Center, 3Works of Wonder International, 4DeVos Graduate Sports Business Management Program, University of Central Florida

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JoVE 55816


 JoVE In-Press

Abdominal Exam III: Palpation

JoVE 10089

Source: Alexander Goldfarb, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, MA

Abdominal palpation, if performed correctly, allows for examination of the large and relatively superficial organs; for a skilled examiner, it allows for assessment of the smaller and deeper structures as well. The amount of information that can be obtained by palpation of the abdominal area also depends on the anatomical characteristics of the patient. For example, obesity might make palpation of internal organs difficult and require that additional maneuvers be performed. Abdominal palpation provides valuable information regarding localization of the problem and its severity, as abdominal palpation identifies the areas of tenderness as well as presence of organomegaly and tumors. The specific focus of palpation is driven by the information collected during history taking and other elements of the abdominal exam. Palpation helps to integrate this information and develop the strategy for subsequent diagnostic steps.


 Physical Examinations II

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