Show Advanced Search

REFINE YOUR SEARCH:

Containing Text
- - -
+
Filter by author or institution
GO
Filter by publication date
From:
October, 2006
Until:
Today
Filter by journal section

Filter by science education

 
 
Muscle Strength: The amount of force generated by Muscle contraction. Muscle strength can be measured during isometric, isotonic, or isokinetic contraction, either manually or using a device such as a Muscle strength dynamometer.

Manual Muscle Testing: A Method of Measuring Extremity Muscle Strength Applied to Critically Ill Patients

1Outcomes After Critical Illness and Surgery (OACIS) Group, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, 2Critical Care Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Program, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 3Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Johns Hopkins University, 4Department of Rehabilitation Services, University of Maryland Medical System

JoVE 2632


 Medicine

Adapted Resistance Training Improves Strength in Eight Weeks in Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis

1Motion Analysis Laboratory, Kennedy Krieger Institute, 2Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 3Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 4Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

JoVE 53449


 Medicine

Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Skeletal Muscle Disease

1Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, 2Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, 4Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University, 5Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vanderbilt University, 6Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University

JoVE 52352


 Medicine

Motor Exam I

JoVE 10052

Source:Tracey A. Milligan, MD; Tamara B. Kaplan, MD; Neurology, Brigham and Women's/Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Abnormalities in the motor function are associated with a wide range of diseases, from movement disorders and myopathies to strokes. The motor assessment starts with observation of the patient. When the patient enters the examination area, the clinician observes the patient's ability to walk unassisted and the speed and coordination while moving. Taking the patient's history provides an additional opportunity to observe for evidence of tremors or other abnormal movements, such as chorea or tardive dyskinesia. Such simple but important observations can yield valuable clues to the diagnosis and help to focus the rest of the examination. The motor assessment continues in a systematic fashion, including inspection for muscle atrophy and abnormal movements, assessment of muscle tone, muscle strength testing, and finally the examination of the muscle reflexes and coordination. The careful systematic testing of the motor system and the integration of all the findings provide insight to the level at which the motor pathway is affected, and also help the clinician to formulate the differential diagnosis and determine the course of the subsequent evaluation and treatment.


 Physical Examinations III

Paradigms of Lower Extremity Electrical Stimulation Training After Spinal Cord Injury

1Spinal Cord Injury and Disorders Service, Hunter Holmes McGuire VAMC, 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Virginia Commonwealth University, 3Deceased, Department of Kinesiology, The University of Georgia, 4Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 57000


 JoVE In-Press

Non-invasive Assessments of Subjective and Objective Recovery Characteristics Following an Exhaustive Jump Protocol

1Department of Business Economics, Health and Social Care, University of Applied Sciences and Arts of Southern Switzerland, 2University College Physiotherapy "Thim van der Laan", 3Department of Movement and Sport Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 4Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp

JoVE 55612


 Medicine

Tissue Triage and Freezing for Models of Skeletal Muscle Disease

1Division of Pediatric Pathology, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, 2Department of Physiology and Cell Biology, The Ohio State University, 3Department of Human Nutrition, Foods and Exercise, Virginia Tech, 4Division of Biomedical Informatics, Department of Biostatistics, Department of Computer Science, University of Kentucky, 5Division of Genetics and Genomics, The Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 6Cure Congenital Muscular Dystrophy, 7Joshua Frase Foundation, 8Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, 9Department of Physiology, University of Arizona

JoVE 51586


 Biology

Shoulder Exam II

JoVE 10185

Source: Robert E. Sallis, MD. Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California, USA

The shoulder exam continues by checking the strength of the rotator cuff muscles and biceps tendons. The rotator cuff muscles (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis) act as compressors, holding the humeral head in place against the glenoid. Injury and degeneration of the rotator cuff tendons are the most common sources of shoulder pain. The strength testing of the rotator muscle is performed by testing motions against resistance applied by the examiner. Pain with these resisted motions suggests tendonitis; weakness suggests a rotator cuff tear. The strength tested is followed by tests for impingement syndrome, shoulder instability, and labrum injury. It is important to test both of the shoulders and compare between the sides. The opposite shoulder should be used as the standard to evaluate the injured shoulder, provided it has not been injured as well.


 Physical Examinations III

Contractility Measurements of Human Uterine Smooth Muscle to Aid Drug Development

1Harris-Wellbeing Preterm Birth Research Centre, Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, 2School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Queensland, 3Faculty of Chemistry, Institute of Biological Chemistry, University of Vienna, 4Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, 5Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56639


 JoVE In-Press

Measurement of Maximum Isometric Force Generated by Permeabilized Skeletal Muscle Fibers

1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Michigan Medical School, 2Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan Medical School, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan Medical School, 4Department of Surgery, Section of Plastic Surgery, University of Michigan Medical School

JoVE 52695


 Bioengineering

In Situ Immunofluorescent Staining of Autophagy in Muscle Stem Cells

1Department of Medicine, Institute of Translational Pharmacology, Italian National Research Council, 2Epigenetics and Regenerative Medicine, IRCCS Fondazione Santa Lucia, 3Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), 4Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia

JoVE 55908


 Biology

Isometric and Eccentric Force Generation Assessment of Skeletal Muscles Isolated from Murine Models of Muscular Dystrophies

1Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 2Department of Physiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, School of Dental Medicine, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

JoVE 50036


 Biology

Phosphorus-31 Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: A Tool for Measuring In Vivo Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation Capacity in Human Skeletal Muscle

1Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, The Ohio State University, 2Laboratory of Clinical Investigation, National Institute on Aging, 3Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, The Ohio State University, 4Department of Human Sciences, Human Nutrition, The Ohio State University, 5Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania

JoVE 54977


 Medicine

Elbow Exam

JoVE 10207

Source: Robert E. Sallis, MD. Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California, USA

The elbow is a hinged joint that involves the articulation of 3 bones: the humerus, radius, and ulna. It is a much more stable joint than the shoulder, and because of that, the elbow has less range of motion. The elbow and its structures are prone to significant injuries, particularly with repetitive motion. Lateral and medial epicondylitis (also called tennis elbow and golfer's elbow) are two common diagnoses and often occur as a result of occupational activities. When examining the elbow, it is important to remove enough clothing so that the entire shoulder and elbow can be inspected. It is important to compare the injured elbow to the uninvolved side. A systematic evaluation of the elbow includes inspection, palpation, range of motion (ROM) testing, and special tests, including maneuvers to evaluate ligamentous stability and stretch tests to accentuate pain caused by epicondylitis.


 Physical Examinations III

Engineering 3D Cellularized Collagen Gels for Vascular Tissue Regeneration

1Laboratory for Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Department Min-Met-Materials Eng & CHU de Québec Research Center, Canada Research Chair I for the Innovation in Surgery, Laval University, 2NSERC CREATE Program for Regenerative Medicine (NCPRM), Laval University, 3Department Electronics, Information and Bioengineering, Politecnico di Milano, 4Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, 5National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council (Canada), 6Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, University of Western Ontario

JoVE 52812


 Bioengineering

Neck Exam

JoVE 10180

Source: Robert E. Sallis, MD. Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California, USA

Examination of the neck can be a challenge because of the many bones, joints, and ligaments that make up the underlying cervical spine. The cervical spine is composed of seven vertebrae stacked in gentle C-shaped curve. The anterior part of each vertebra is made up of the thick bony body, which is linked to the body above and below by intervertebral discs. These discs help provide stability and shock absorption to the cervical spine. The posterior elements of the vertebra, which include the laminae, transverse, and spinous processes and the facet joints, form a protective canal for the cervical spinal cord and its nerve roots. The cervical spine supports the head and protects the neural elements as they come from the brain and from the spinal cord. Therefore, injuries or disorders affecting the neck can also affect the underlying spinal cord and have potentially catastrophic consequences. The significant motion that occurs in the neck places the cervical spine at increased risk for injury and degenerative changes. The cervical spine is also a common source of radicular pain in the shoulder. For this reason, the neck should be evaluated as a routine part of every shoulder exam.


 Physical Examinations III

Hip Exam

JoVE 10174

Source: Robert E. Sallis, MD. Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California, USA

The hip is a ball-and-socket joint that consists of the femoral head articulating with the acetabulum. When combined with the hip ligaments, the hip makes for a very strong and stable joint. But, despite this stability, the hip has considerable motion and is prone to degeneration with wear and tear over time and after injury. Hip pain can affect patients of all ages and can be associated with various intra- and extra-articular pathologies. Anatomic location of pain in the hip region can often provide initial diagnostic clues. Essential aspects of the hip exam include an inspection for asymmetry, swelling, and gait abnormalities; palpation for areas of tenderness; range of motion and strength testing; a neurological (sensory) exam; and additional special diagnostic maneuvers to narrow down the differential diagnosis.


 Physical Examinations III

The C. elegans Intestine As a Model for Intercellular Lumen Morphogenesis and In Vivo Polarized Membrane Biogenesis at the Single-cell Level: Labeling by Antibody Staining, RNAi Loss-of-function Analysis and Imaging

1Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center, Developmental Biology and Genetics Core, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 2College of Life Sciences, Jilin University, 3Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau

JoVE 56100


 Developmental Biology

Myo-mechanical Analysis of Isolated Skeletal Muscle

1Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California San Francisco, 2Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Francisco, 3Department of Biology, San Francisco State University, 4Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, 5Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine & Stem Cell Research, University of California San Francisco

JoVE 2582


 Medicine

Using TMS to Measure Motor Excitability During Action Observation

JoVE 10270

Source: Laboratories of Jonas T. Kaplan and Sarah I. Gimbel—University of Southern California

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that involves passing current through an insulated coil placed against the scalp. A brief magnetic field is created by current in the coil, and because of the physical process of induction, this leads to a current in the nearby neural tissue. Depending on the duration, frequency, and magnitude of these magnetic pulses, the underlying neural circuitry can be affected in many different ways. Here, we demonstrate the technique of single-pulse TMS, in which one brief magnetic pulse is used to stimulate the neocortex. One observable effect of TMS is that it can produce muscle twitches when applied over the motor cortex. Due to the somatotopic organization of the motor cortex, different muscles can be targeted depending on the precise placement of the coil. The electrical signals that cause these muscle twitches, called motor evoked potentials, or MEPs, can be recorded and quantified by electrodes placed on the skin over the targeted muscle. The amplitude of MEPs can be interpreted to reflect the underlying excitability of the motor cortex; for example, when the motor cortex is activated, observed MEPs are larger.


 Neuropsychology

12345678950
More Results...