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Neural Crest: The two longitudinal ridges along the Primitive streak appearing near the end of Gastrulation during development of nervous system (Neurulation). The ridges are formed by folding of Neural plate. Between the ridges is a neural groove which deepens as the fold become elevated. When the folds meet at midline, the groove becomes a closed tube, the Neural tube.

Determination

JoVE 10912

During embryogenesis, cells become progressively committed to different fates through a two-step process: specification followed by determination. Specification is demonstrated by removing a segment of an early embryo, “neutrally” culturing the tissue in vitro—for example, in a petri dish with simple medium—and then observing the derivatives. If the cultured region gives rise to cell types that it would normally generate in the embryo, this means that it is specified. In contrast, determination occurs if a region of the embryo is removed and placed in a “non-neutral” environment—such as in a dish containing complex medium supplemented with a variety of proteins, or even a different area of the embryo itself—and it still generates the expected derivatives. Specification and determination are two sequential steps in the developmental pathway of a cell, which precede the final stage of differentiation, during which mature tissues with unique morphologies and functions are produced. To study specification, researchers must first understand the normal derivatives of different regions of an embryo. To accomplish this, fate maps are often used, which are generated by dyeing or labeling cells early in embryonic development, culturing whole embryos and monitoring where the marked cells end up. For example, such te

 Core: Reproduction and Development

Neurulation

JoVE 10910

Neurulation is the embryological process which forms the precursors of the central nervous system and occurs after gastrulation has established the three primary cell layers of the embryo: ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. In humans, the majority of this system is formed via primary neurulation, in which the central portion of the ectoderm—originally appearing as a flat sheet of cells—folds upwards and inwards, sealing off to form a hollow neural tube. As development proceeds, the anterior portion of the neural tube will give rise to the brain, with the rest forming the spinal cord. The central portion of the ectoderm that bends to generate the neural tube is aptly called the neural ectoderm, while the areas that flank it—along the periphery of the embryo—are the surface ectoderm. However, at the junction of the neural and surface ectoderm lies another population of cells, called the neural crest. As the neural folds (the edges of the elevating neural tube) begin to appear, neural crest cells (NCCs) can be visualized in their tips through the expression of characteristic markers, like the Pax7 transcription factor. As development proceeds and the neural folds fuse, NCCs can be observed either in the top-most portion of the neural tube or migrating along this structure’s sides towards lower regions of the embryo. To migrate, N

 Core: Reproduction and Development

Pleiotropy

JoVE 10780

Pleiotropy is the phenomenon in which a single gene impacts multiple, seemingly unrelated phenotypic traits. For example, defects in the SOX10 gene cause Waardenburg Syndrome Type 4, or WS4, which can cause defects in pigmentation, hearing impairments, and an absence of intestinal contractions necessary for elimination. This diversity of phenotypes results from the expression pattern of SOX10 in early embryonic and fetal development. SOX10 is found in neural crest cells that form melanocytes, which are involved in pigmentation and also in the early development of the ear. SOX10 is also expressed in nerve tissue that eventually contributes to the enteric nervous system in the gut, which controls the contractions necessary for waste elimination. In this way, SOX10 exhibits pleiotropic effects, because it influences multiple phenotypes. Pleiotropy can arise through several mechanisms. Gene pleiotropy occurs when a gene has various functions due to encoding a product that interacts with multiple proteins or catalyzes multiple reactions. For example, in humans, an abnormal copy of the SOX10 gene, in which a region is deleted, can lead to developmental defects that include a white forelock, different-colored irises (e.g., one blue and one brown), and regions of unpigmented skin. These traits are all symptoms of a di

 Core: Classical and Modern Genetics

An Introduction to Developmental Neurobiology

JoVE 5207

Developmental neuroscience is a field that explores how the nervous system is formed, from early embryonic stages through adulthood. Although it is known that neural progenitor cells follow predictable stages of proliferation, differentiation, migration, and maturation, the mechanisms controlling the progression through each stage are incompletely understood. Studying…

 Neuroscience

Transplantation Studies

JoVE 5336

Many developmental biologists are interested in the molecular signals and cellular interactions that induce a group of cells to develop into a particular tissue. To investigate this, scientists can use a classic technique known as transplantation, which involves tissue from a donor embryo being excised and grafted into a host embryo. By observing how transplanted tissues develop in host…

 Developmental Biology

Chick ex ovo Culture

JoVE 5157

One strength of the chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) as a model organism for developmental biology is that the embryo develops outside the female and is easily accessible for experimental manipulation. Many techniques allow scientists to examine chicken embryos inside the eggshell (in ovo), but embryonic access can be limited at later stages of development.…

 Biology II

Genetic Engineering of Model Organisms

JoVE 5327

Transgenesis, or the use of genetic engineering to alter gene expression, is widely used in the field of developmental biology. Scientists use a number of approaches to alter the function of genes to understand their roles in developmental processes. This includes replacement of a gene with a nonfunctional copy, or adding a visualizable tag to a gene that allows the resultant fusion protein to …

 Developmental Biology

Flow Cytometry Protocols for Surface and Intracellular Antigen Analyses of Neural Cell Types

1Emmy Noether-Group for Stem Cell Biology, Department of Molecular Embryology, Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Freiburg, 2Spemann Graduate School of Biology and Medicine and Faculty of Biology, University of Freiburg, 3School of Life Sciences, Keele University, 4Center for Biological Signaling Studies (BIOSS), University of Freiburg

JoVE 52241

 Neuroscience

An Enzyme- and Serum-free Neural Stem Cell Culture Model for EMT Investigation Suited for Drug Discovery

1Dept. of Biomedicine, Pharmacenter, University of Basel, 2Molecular Signalling and Gene Therapy, Narayana Nethralaya Foundation, Narayana Health City, 3Brain Ischemia and Regeneration, Department of Biomedicine, University Hospital Basel, 4Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum Idar-Oberstein, 5Department of Neurosurgery and Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University, 6Department of Neurology, Laboratory of Molecular Neuro Oncology, University Hospital of Zurich

JoVE 54018

 Developmental Biology

Isolation, Fixation, and Immunofluorescence Imaging of Mouse Adrenal Glands

1Department of Internal Medicine (Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology, and Diabetes), University of Michigan Health System, 2Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan Health System, 3Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan Health System, 4Endocrine Oncology Program, University of Michigan Health System, 5Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan Health System

JoVE 58530

 Immunology and Infection

Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Based Developmental Toxicity Assays for Chemical Safety Screening and Systems Biology Data Generation

1Center of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Institute of Neurophysiology, University of Cologne, 2Department of Biology, University of Konstanz, 3Department of Statistics, Technical University of Dortmund, 4Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors, Technical University of Dortmund

JoVE 52333

 Developmental Biology

Isolation of Enteric Glial Cells from the Submucosa and Lamina Propria of the Adult Mouse

1Department of Internal Medicine-Gastroenterology, University of Michigan, 2Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan, 3Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, 4Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, 5Division of Gastroenterology, University of Arizona College of Medicine

JoVE 57629

 Biology

High Efficiency Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells to Cardiomyocytes and Characterization by Flow Cytometry

1Department of Biochemistry, Medical College of Wisconsin, 2Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, 3Department of Anesthesiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, 4Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Consortium, LKS Faculty of Medicine, Hong Kong University, 5Division of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 6Cardiovascular Research Center, Biotechnology and Bioengineering Center, Medical College of Wisconsin

JoVE 52010

 Biology

Atomic Absorbance Spectroscopy to Measure Intracellular Zinc Pools in Mammalian Cells

1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 2Department of Chemistry, Skidmore College, 3Candiac MR Center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 4Facultad de Ciencias Químico Biológicas, Universidad Autónoma de Guerrero

JoVE 59519

 Biochemistry

Large-Scale Production of Cardiomyocytes from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Using a Highly Reproducible Small Molecule-Based Differentiation Protocol

1Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Cell Science Research Center, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, ACECR, 2Developmental and Stem Cell Biology Division, Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute, 3St. Vincent´s Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, 4School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, 5Department of Developmental Biology, University of Science and Culture, 6Heart Centre for Children, The Children´s Hospital at Westmead, 7Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, 8Department of Developmental Biology, University of Science and Culture, Tehran, Iran

JoVE 54276

 Developmental Biology

Dissection, Culture and Analysis of Primary Cranial Neural Crest Cells from Mouse for the Study of Neural Crest Cell Delamination and Migration

1Centre for Craniofacial and Regenerative Biology, King's College London, 2Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, FORTH, Department of Biomedical Research, University of Ioannina, 3Randall Centre of Cell & Molecular Biophysics, King's College London, 4Department of Biological Applications and Technology, University of Ioannina

JoVE 60051

 Developmental Biology

Transplantation of Zebrafish Pediatric Brain Tumors into Immune-competent Hosts for Long-term Study of Tumor Cell Behavior and Drug Response

1Department of Oncological Sciences and Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah School of Medicine, 2Department of Dermatology, University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City

JoVE 55712

 Cancer Research
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