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Neural Plate: The region in the dorsal Ectoderm of a chordate embryo that gives rise to the future Central nervous system. Tissue in the neural plate is called the neuroectoderm, often used as a synonym of neural plate.

Neurulation

JoVE 10910

Neurulation is the embryological process which forms the precursors of the central nervous system and occurs after gastrulation has established the three primary cell layers of the embryo: ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. In humans, the majority of this system is formed via primary neurulation, in which the central portion of the ectoderm—originally appearing as a flat sheet of cells—folds upwards and inwards, sealing off to form a hollow neural tube. As development proceeds, the anterior portion of the neural tube will give rise to the brain, with the rest forming the spinal cord. The central portion of the ectoderm that bends to generate the neural tube is aptly called the neural ectoderm, while the areas that flank it—along the periphery of the embryo—are the surface ectoderm. However, at the junction of the neural and surface ectoderm lies another population of cells, called the neural crest. As the neural folds (the edges of the elevating neural tube) begin to appear, neural crest cells (NCCs) can be visualized in their tips through the expression of characteristic markers, like the Pax7 transcription factor. As development proceeds and the neural folds fuse, NCCs can be observed either in the top-most portion of the neural tube or migrating along this structure’s sides towards lower regions of the embryo. To migrate, N

 Core: Reproduction and Development

Dissection, Culture and Analysis of Primary Cranial Neural Crest Cells from Mouse for the Study of Neural Crest Cell Delamination and Migration

1Centre for Craniofacial and Regenerative Biology, King's College London, 2Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, FORTH, Department of Biomedical Research, University of Ioannina, 3Randall Centre of Cell & Molecular Biophysics, King's College London, 4Department of Biological Applications and Technology, University of Ioannina

JoVE 60051

 Developmental Biology

A Method for Lineage Tracing of Corneal Cells Using Multi-color Fluorescent Reporter Mice

1Department of Genetics and Developmental Biology, The Ruth and Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, 3Bioimging Center, Biomedical Core Facility, The Ruth and Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology

JoVE 53370

 Developmental Biology
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