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Nitric Oxide: A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from Arginine by Nitric oxide synthase. Nitric oxide is one of the Endothelium-dependent relaxing factors released by the vascular endothelium and mediates Vasodilation. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic Guanylate cyclase and thus elevates intracellular levels of Cyclic gmp.

Application of Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Nitric Oxide (NO•) Probes, the geNOps, for Real-time Imaging of NO• Signals in Single Cells

1Institute of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Medical University of Graz

JoVE 55486


 Biology

En Face Detection of Nitric Oxide and Superoxide in Endothelial Layer of Intact Arteries

1Cardiovascular and Aging Research, Department of Medicine, Division of Physiology, Faculty of Science, University of Fribourg, 2Kidney Control of Homeostasis, Swiss National Centre of Competence in Research, 3System Physiology, Department of Medicine, Division of Physiology, Faculty of Science, University of Fribourg

JoVE 53718


 Biology

Evaluation of Vascular Control Mechanisms Utilizing Video Microscopy of Isolated Resistance Arteries of Rats

1Department of Physical Therapy, Marquette University, 2Medical College of Wisconsin, 3Department of Physiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, 4Graduate Programs of Nurse Anesthesia, Texas Wesleyan University, 5Office of Research, Medical College of Wisconsin

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56133


 JoVE In-Press

Parallel-plate Flow Chamber and Continuous Flow Circuit to Evaluate Endothelial Progenitor Cells under Laminar Flow Shear Stress

1Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, 3School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 4Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Duke University Medical Center

JoVE 3349


 Bioengineering

Ultrasound Assessment of Flow-Mediated Dilation of the Brachial and Superficial Femoral Arteries in Rats

1Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah, 2Department of Kinesiology and Health Education, University of Texas at Austin, 3Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of Utah, 4Department of Biochemistry, University of Utah, 5Department of Exercise and Sport Science, University of Utah, 6Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Department of Veterans Affairs

JoVE 54762


 Medicine

Removal of Trace Elements by Cupric Oxide Nanoparticles from Uranium In Situ Recovery Bleed Water and Its Effect on Cell Viability

1Division of Physical Therapy, Department of Orthopedics & Rehabilitation, University of New Mexico, 2Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, University of Wyoming, 3School of Pharmacy, University of Wyoming, 4Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, 5Center for Environmental Medicine, Colorado State University, 6College of Pharmacy, California Northstate University

JoVE 52715


 Environment

Determination Of NOx in Automobile Exhaust Using UV-VIS Spectroscopy

JoVE 10076

Source: Laboratories of Margaret Workman and Kimberly Frye - Depaul University

In the troposphere, ozone is naturally formed when sunlight splits nitrogen dioxide (NO2):

NO2 + sunlight → NO + O

O + O2 O3 Ozone (O3) can go on to react with nitric oxide (NO) to form nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and oxygen: NO + O3 → NO2 + O2 This results in no net gain of ozone (O3). However, with the anthropogenic production of ozone forming precursors (NO, NO2, and volatile organic compounds) through the combustion of fossil fuels, elevated levels of ozone in the troposphere have been found. Motor vehicle exhaust is a significant source of these ozone forming precursors: NO, NO2, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). For example, mobile sources make up nearly 60% of NO + NO2 emissions. At the high temperatures found in a car’s combustion chamber, nitrogen and oxygen from the air react to form nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2):


 Environmental Science

Dispersion of Nanomaterials in Aqueous Media: Towards Protocol Optimization

1School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, 2Analytical Science, National Physical Laboratory, 3INAC-LCIB, Université Grenoble Alpes, 4CEA, INAC-SyMMES, 5NIMBE, CEA, CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, CEA Saclay, 6Chemical, Medical and Environmental Science, National Physical Laboratory, 7BAM Division 6.1 'Surface Analysis and Interfacial Chemistry', BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, 8Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56074


 JoVE In-Press

Imaging Approaches to Assessments of Toxicological Oxidative Stress Using Genetically-Encoded Fluorogenic Sensors

1Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, 3Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56945


 JoVE In-Press

The Assembly and Application of 'Shear Rings': A Novel Endothelial Model for Orbital, Unidirectional and Periodic Fluid Flow and Shear Stress

1Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport, 2Biological Sciences, Louisiana Tech University, 3Neurology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport, 4Institut Cochin, Inserm U1016, Cnrs Umr8104, Université Paris Descartes

JoVE 54632


 Biology

Synthesis of Cationized Magnetoferritin for Ultra-fast Magnetization of Cells

1Bristol Centre for Functional Nanomaterials, University of Bristol, 2Department of Materials, Imperial College London, 3Self Assembly Group, CIC nanoGUNE, 4Ikebasque, Basque Foundation for Science, 5School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Bristol, 6H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol

JoVE 54785


 Bioengineering

Increasing Pulmonary Artery Pulsatile Flow Improves Hypoxic Pulmonary Hypertension in Piglets

1Department of Medicine, Pulmonary Hypertension Research Group (CRIUCPQ), Laval University, 2Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, 3Université Diderot Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 4Hôpital Lariboisière, Physiologie clinique Explorations Fonctionnelles, 5INSERM U 965, 6Service de Cardiologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Tours

JoVE 52571


 Medicine

Introduction to Mass Spectrometry

JoVE 5634

Source: Laboratory of Dr. Khuloud Al-Jamal - King's College London

Mass spectrometry is an analytical chemistry technique that enables the identification of unknown compounds within a sample, the quantification of known materials, the determination of the structure, and chemical properties of different molecules.

A mass spectrometer is composed of an ionization source, an analyzer, and a detector. The process involves the ionization of chemical compounds to generate ions. When using inductively coupled plasma (ICP), samples containing elements of interest are introduced into argon plasma as aerosol droplets. The plasma dries the aerosol, dissociates the molecules, and then removes an electron from the components to be detected by the mass spectrometer. Other ionization methods such as electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) are used to analyze biological samples. Following the ionization procedure, ions are separated in the mass spectrometer according to their mass-to-charge ratio (m/z), and the relative abundance of each ion type is measured. Finally, the detector commonly consists in an electron multiplier where the collision of ions with a charged anode leads to a cascade of increasing number of electrons, which can b


 Analytical Chemistry

Rapid Scan Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Opens New Avenues for Imaging Physiologically Important Parameters In Vivo

1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Denver, 2Magnetic Imaging Group, Applied Physics Division, Physical Measurements Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 3Department of Radiology, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth University, 4Department of Biochemistry, West Virginia University, 5Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Denver, 6Department of Engineering, University of Denver

JoVE 54068


 Bioengineering

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