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Osteogenesis, Distraction: Bone lengthening by gradual mechanical distraction. An external fixation device produces the distraction across the bone plate. The technique was originally applied to long bones but in recent years the method has been adapted for use with mandibular implants in maxillofacial surgery.

An Efficient and Reproducible Protocol for Distraction Osteogenesis in a Rat Model Leading to a Functional Regenerated Femur

1CNRS, ISM, Inst Movement Sci, Aix Marseille Univ, 2Sainte-Marguerite Hospital, Institute for Locomotion, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, APHM, 3Sainte-Marguerite Hospital, Institute for Locomotion, Department of Peadiatric Orthopaedics, APHM, 4Ecole centrale de Marseille, 5Faculté de Pharmacie, Laboratoire de Biochimie, 6Service Central de la Qualité et de l'Information Pharmaceutiques, APHM

JoVE 56433


 Bioengineering

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Computed Tomography and Optical Imaging of Osteogenesis-angiogenesis Coupling to Assess Integration of Cranial Bone Autografts and Allografts

1Skeletal Biotech Laboratory, The Hebrew University–Hadassah Faculty of Dental Medicine, 2Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 3Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 4Biomedical Imaging Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

JoVE 53459


 Bioengineering

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Isolation of Blood-vessel-derived Multipotent Precursors from Human Skeletal Muscle

1Stem Cell Research Center, Department of Bioengineering and Orthopedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, 3Nazarbayev University Research and Innovation System, Nazarbayev University, 4Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, UCLA Orthopaedic Hospital and the Orthopaedic Hospital Research Center, University of California at Los Angeles, 5Department of Cell Biology, Erasmus MC Stem Cell Institute, 6OHSU Center for Regenerative Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, 7Centre for Cardiovascular Science and MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, Queen's Medical Research Institute and University of Edinburgh, 8David Geffen School of Medicine and the Orthopaedic Hospital Research Center, University of California at Los Angeles, 9Stem Cell Research Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery and McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh

JoVE 51195


 Biology

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Visualizing Angiogenesis by Multiphoton Microscopy In Vivo in Genetically Modified 3D-PLGA/nHAp Scaffold for Calvarial Critical Bone Defect Repair

1Center for Translational Medicine Research and Development, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Maastricht UMC+, 3Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University Hospital RWTH, 4Research Laboratory for Biomedical Optics and Molecular Imaging, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences

JoVE 55381


 Bioengineering

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Rapid Isolation of BMPR-IB+ Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells for Use in a Calvarial Defect Healing Model

1Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine

JoVE 55120


 Developmental Biology

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Distinctive Capillary Action by Micro-channels in Bone-like Templates can Enhance Recruitment of Cells for Restoration of Large Bony Defect

1Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Columbia University, 2Endodontics, Columbia University, 3Mechanical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, South Korea, 4Orthodontics, The Ohio State University, 5Pathology, Weill Cornell Medical College

JoVE 52947


 Bioengineering

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Isolation and Enrichment of Human Adipose-derived Stromal Cells for Enhanced Osteogenesis

1Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 2Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University

JoVE 52181


 Developmental Biology

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Repair of a Critical-sized Calvarial Defect Model Using Adipose-derived Stromal Cells Harvested from Lipoaspirate

1Department of Surgery, Stanford University, 2Department of Surgery, Duke University, 3Department of Surgery, Saint Joseph Mercy Hospital, 4School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, 5School of Dentistry, University of California, Los Angeles

JoVE 4221


 Medicine

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Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Culture and Delivery in Autologous Conditions: A Smart Approach for Orthopedic Applications

1Dept. of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, 2OtoLab, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana (AOUP), 3Dept. of Civil and Industrial Engineering, University of Pisa, 4Immunohematology Operative Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana (AOUP), 5Dept. Of Surgical, Medical, Molecular Pathology and Emergency Medicine, University of Pisa, 6II Orthopedic and Traumatologic Clinic, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana (AOUP)

JoVE 54845


 Bioengineering

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The Arteriovenous (AV) Loop in a Small Animal Model to Study Angiogenesis and Vascularized Tissue Engineering

1Department of Plastic and Hand Surgery and Laboratory for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, University Hospital of Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), 2Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Institute for Postgraduate Studies, Baghdad University, 3Department of Plastic, Hand and Microsurgery, Sana Klinikum Hof GmbH

JoVE 54676


 Bioengineering

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Calcification of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells and Imaging of Aortic Calcification and Inflammation

1Anesthesia Center for Critical Care Research of the Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care, and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 2Cardiovascular Research Center and Cardiology Division of the Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 3Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 4Harvard Medical School, 5Department of Anesthesiology, Uniklinik RWTH Aachen, RWTH Aachen University, 6Center for Immunology and Inflammatory Diseases and the Division of Rheumatology, Allergy, and Immunology of the Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital

JoVE 54017


 Medicine

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Interictal High Frequency Oscillations Detected with Simultaneous Magnetoencephalography and Electroencephalography as Biomarker of Pediatric Epilepsy

1Fetal-Neonatal Neuroimaging and Developmental Science Center, Division of Newborn Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 2Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 3Division of Epilepsy Surgery, Department of Neurosurgery, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 4Division of Epilepsy and Clinical Neurophysiology, Department of Neurology, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School

JoVE 54883


 Medicine

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Polyelectrolyte Complex for Heparin Binding Domain Osteogenic Growth Factor Delivery

1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 2Centre for Research in Medical Devices (CÚRAM), National University of Ireland Galway, 3Department of Bioengineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4Tissue Engineering Program, National University of Singapore, 5Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and the Orthopaedic Hospital Research Center, University of California, Los Angeles

JoVE 54202


 Bioengineering

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Preparing and Administering Enteric Tube Medications

JoVE 10287

Source: Madeline Lassche, MSNEd, RN and Katie Baraki, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, University of Utah, UT

An enteric tube is a tube that is inserted and passed into the stomach or intestines. Enteric tubes serve multiple purposes, including stomach decompression (through the removal of air, gastric contents, and secretions), enteric feeding, and/or the administration of medications or oral contrast. Enteric tubes are indicated for patients with impaired swallowing and for patients with neurological or other conditions associated with an increased risk of aspiration, or when the patient is unable to maintain adequate oral intake of fluid or calories. There are multiple types of enteric tubes, with their generic names assigned according to the insertion site and the gastrointestinal termination point. For instance, one of the common tube types is the nasogastric tube, which is inserted through a nostril and passed along the upper gastrointestinal tract into the stomach. When administering medications through an enteric tube, it is important to ensure that the tube terminates in the intended gastrointestinal location. When enteric tubes are initially placed, the position of the tube is verified by X-ray. However, due to gastric peristalsis, enteric tubes may migrate out of their intended


 Nursing Skills

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A Familiarization Protocol Facilitates the Participation of Children with ASD in Electrophysiological Research

1Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Southern Connecticut State University, 2Haskins Laboratories, 3Department of Psychology, Southern Connecticut State University, 4Department of Social Work, Southern Connecticut State University, 5Department of Psychology, University of Connecticut

JoVE 55941


 Neuroscience

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An Objective and Reproducible Test of Olfactory Learning and Discrimination in Mice

1Program in Developmental Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, 2Medical Scientist Training Program, Baylor College of Medicine, 3Department of Neuroscience, Baylor College of Medicine, 4Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, 5Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute at Texas Children's Hospital

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JoVE 57142


 JoVE In-Press

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Preparing and Administering Subcutaneous Medications

JoVE 10234

Source: Madeline Lassche, MSNEd, RN and Katie Baraki, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, University of Utah, UT

Subcutaneous medication administration is a parenteral approach to administer small amounts of medication (less than 2 mL) into the layer of tissue just below the skin. Common medications administered via the subcutaneous route include anticoagulant medications, such as heparin or enoxaparin; epinephrine administered for allergic reactions; insulin; and some immunizations. Subcutaneous injection preparations are commonly provided in vials or ampules for withdrawal into a subcutaneous syringe. Subcutaneous needles have a shorter length and smaller diameter than syringes used for intramuscular injections, are typically less than 5/8th of an inch, and are 26 gauge or smaller. Medication absorption and onset is slower than for intravenous routes, with some absorption rates lasting 24 h or longer. This approach is selected for many medications that may be denatured or deactivated if given via the oral route, given the acidity of the gastrointestinal tract. Subcutaneous injection preparations are commonly provided in vials or ampules for withdrawal into a subcutaneous syringe. The nurse should determine the appropriate medication dose according to


 Nursing Skills

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