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Patient Care: The services rendered by members of the health profession and non-professionals under their supervision for the benefit of the patient. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p269)

Technique and Patient Selection Criteria of Right Anterior Mini-Thoracotomy for Minimal Access Aortic Valve Replacement

1Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Pitié Salpêtrière University Hospital, Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris (APHP), Institut de Cardiologie, 2Institute of Veterinary Physiology and Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology, University of Zurich, 3Herzzentrum Hirslanden, Klinik St Anna, 4Department of Radiology, Canton Hospital Lucerne, 5Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Unit, Pitié Salpêtrière University Hospital, Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris (APHP), Institut de Cardiologie

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 57323


 JoVE In-Press

Esophageal Heat Transfer for Patient Temperature Control and Targeted Temperature Management

1Center for Advanced Design, Research, and Exploration, University of Illinois at Chicago, 2Attune Medical, 3University of Maryland School of Nursing, 4University of Western Ontario, 5University Medical Centre Maribor, 6University of Maryland, 7Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center

JoVE 56579


 Medicine

Guidelines and Experience Using Imaging Biomarker Explorer (IBEX) for Radiomics

1Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 2UTHealth Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 3Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

JoVE 57132


 Engineering

The Multiple Sclerosis Performance Test (MSPT): An iPad-Based Disability Assessment Tool

1Mellen Center for Multiple Sclerosis Treatment and Research, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 2Center for Brain Health, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 3Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 4Department of Biomedical Engineering, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation

JoVE 51318


 Medicine

Standardized Technique of Aortic Valve Re-implantation for Valve-sparing Aortic Root Replacement

1Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Pitie Salpetriere University Hospital, Assistance Publique, Hopitaux de Paris (APHP), Institut de Cardiologie, 2Institute of Veterinary Physiology and Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology, University of Zurich, 3Herzzentrum Hirslanden, Klinik St Anna

JoVE 56790


 Medicine

Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Insertion

JoVE 10264

Source: Madeline Lassche, MSNEd, RN and Katie Baraki, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, University of Utah, UT

The purpose of peripheral intravenous catheter (PIV) insertion is to infuse medications, perform intravenous (IV) fluid therapy, or inject radioactive tracers for special examination procedures. Placing a PIV is an invasive procedure and requires the use of an aseptic, no-touch technique. Common IV venipuncture sites are the arms and hands in adults and the feet in children. According to the Intravenous Nurses Society (INS), the feet should be avoided in the adult population because of the risk of thrombophlebitis. Venipuncture sites should be carefully assessed for contraindications, such as pain, wounds, decreased circulation, a previous cerebral vascular accident (CVA), dialysis fistulas, or a mastectomy on the same side. The median cubital vein and the cephalic vein in the wrist area should be avoided when possible. The cephalic vein has been associated with nerve damage when used for IV placements. The most distal site available on the hand or arm is preferred so that future venipuncture sites may be used if infiltration or extravasation occurs. This video will demonstrate the insertion of a PIV, including the preparation and attachment of an IV extension s


 Nursing Skills

Establishment of a Clinic-based Biorepository

1Affiliated Dermatology & Affiliated Laboratories, Midwestern University Osteopathic Postdoctoral Training Institute, Midwestern University, 2Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, Midwestern University, 3Biomedical Sciences Program, College of Health Sciences, Midwestern University

JoVE 55583


 Medicine

Adaptation of Semiautomated Circulating Tumor Cell (CTC) Assays for Clinical and Preclinical Research Applications

1London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 2Department of Anatomy & Cell Biology, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, 3Special Hematology/Flow Cytometry, London Health Sciences Centre, 4Lawson Health Research Institute, 5Department of Oncology, Western University

JoVE 51248


 Medicine

Initiating Maintenance IV Fluids

JoVE 10274

Source: Madeline Lassche, MSNEd, RN and Katie Baraki, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, University of Utah, UT

Hospitalized patients frequently require the administration of intravenous (IV) fluids to maintain their fluid and electrolyte balance. Certain medical conditions that preclude oral fluid intake may necessitate IV fluid administration, with or without electrolytes, to prevent hypovolemia, dehydration, and electrolyte imbalances. Pre-surgical and pre-procedure patients who require anesthesia are often required to be NPO (i.e., nil per os; Latin for "nothing by mouth") to prevent aspiration and to maintain hydration during the procedure. Post-surgical and post-procedure patients may also require IV fluid administration to increase intravascular volume following surgical blood loss. IV fluids can be delivered by different types of administrations sets: gravity flow infusion devices, which rely on gravitation force to push the fluid to the patient's bloodstream, or infusion pumps, which use a pump mechanism that generates positive pressure. While administering maintenance IV fluids using an infusion pump is the most common approach, facility policy; availability of infusion pump equipment; and other limitations, such as a power outage, may necessitate the use of IV gravity tub


 Nursing Skills

General Approach to the Physical Exam

JoVE 10043

Source: Jaideep S. Talwalkar, MD, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT

The examination of the body is fundamental to the practice of medicine. Since the Roman Empire, physicians have described the connection between alterations in function of specific parts of the body and specific disease states and have sought to further scientific understanding to improve bedside diagnosis. However, in this modern age of increasing technology within medical diagnostics, it is important to consider the role that physical examination plays today. It is misguided to believe that physical examination holds all the answers, and much has been written about the questionable utility of certain maneuvers previously held in high regard. It is equally misguided to suggest that physical examination plays little role in the modern patient encounter. Physical examination remains a valuable diagnostic tool; there are many diagnoses that can only be made by physical examination. A diagnosis made by labs or imaging is rarely done in the absence of findings detectable at the bedside. As the provider conducts a history and physical, they are actively generating and testing hypotheses to explain the patient's condition. The information one gathers may not replace the need


 Physical Examinations I

Observation and Inspection

JoVE 10119

Source: Jaideep S. Talwalkar, MD, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT

Observation and inspection is fundamental to physical examination and begins at the first point of contact with a patient. While observation and inspection are often used interchangeably, observation is a general term that refers to the careful use of one's senses to gain information. Inspection is an act limited to what one can observe visually, and when referring to physical examination, typically refers to findings on the surface of the body, rather than to behaviors. Skilled clinicians utilize all of their senses to assist with gaining an understanding of their patients, relying on vision, touch (percussion and palpation), and hearing (percussion and auscultation) primarily. Smell can also provide important diagnostic information during the patient encounter (e.g., personal hygiene, substance use, or metabolic diseases). Fortunately the sense of taste is largely a historical relic in medicine, though it is interesting to note that diabetes mellitus was diagnosed for many centuries by the sweet taste of the urine. Through experience, clinicians develop an important sixth sense - the gut instinct - that can only be gained through deliberate practice of clinical skills on thousands of pati


 Physical Examinations I

Bioelectric Analyses of an Osseointegrated Intelligent Implant Design System for Amputees

1Department of Veteran Affairs, 2Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, 3Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute , University of Utah, 4Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Utah, 5Department of Orthopaedics, University of Utah

JoVE 1237


 Biology

Laparoscopic Low Anterior Resection with Total Mesorectal Excision for Rectal Cancer

1Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 2Department of exclusive medical care center, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 3Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Red Cross Hospital of Munich

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56907


 JoVE In-Press

Regenerative Therapy by Suprachoroidal Cell Autograft in Dry Age-related Macular Degeneration: Preliminary In Vivo Report

1Low Vision Research Centre of Milan, 2Department of Ophthalmology, A. Fiorini Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, 3Glaucoma and Low Vision Study Center, Department of General Surgery and Organ Transplants, University of Bologna, 4Department of Sense Organs, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, Sapienza University of Rome

JoVE 56469


 Medicine

Whole-brain Segmentation and Change-point Analysis of Anatomical Brain MRI—Application in Premanifest Huntington's Disease

1The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 2Center for Imaging Science, Johns Hopkins University, 3Institute for Computational Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, 4Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Johns Hopkins University, 5Division of Neurobiology, Departments of Psychiatry, Neurology, Neuroscience and Pharmacology, and Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 6F.M. Kirby Research Center for Functional Brain Imaging, Kennedy Krieger Institute, 7Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 57256


 JoVE In-Press

Using Extraordinary Optical Transmission to Quantify Cardiac Biomarkers in Human Serum

1NUS Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, National University of Singapore, 2Cardiovascular Research Institute, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 3Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4Institute of Materials Research Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research)

JoVE 55597


 Bioengineering

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