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Pulmonary Fibrosis: A process in which normal lung tissues are progressively replaced by Fibroblasts and Collagen causing an irreversible loss of the ability to transfer oxygen into the bloodstream via Pulmonary alveoli. Patients show progressive Dyspnea finally resulting in death.

Induction of Mouse Lung Injury by Endotracheal Injection of Bleomycin

1Centro di Tecnologie Avanzate nell'Invecchiamento, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS)-Istituto Nazionale Ricovero e Cura Anziani (INRCA), 2Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche e Molecolari, Università Politecnica delle Marche, 3UOS Centro di Terapia Cellulare "G. Lanzani", Azienda Socio Sanitaria Territoriale (ASST) Papa Giovanni XXIII

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 58922


 JoVE In-Press

Generation of Human 3D Lung Tissue Cultures (3D-LTCs) for Disease Modeling

1Comprehensive Pneumology Center, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität and Helmholtz Zentrum Munich, 2German Center of Lung Research (DZL), 3Translational Lung Research and CPC-M bioArchive, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Comprehensive Pneumology Center Munich DZL/CPC-M, 4Department of Experimental Medical Science, Lung Bioengineering and Regeneration, Lund University, 5Wallenberg Center for Molecular Medicine, Lund University, 6Stem Cell Centre, Lund University, 7Asklepios Fachkliniken Munich-Gauting, 8Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine, University of Colorado

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 58437


 JoVE In-Press

Molecular Analysis of Endothelial-mesenchymal Transition Induced by Transforming Growth Factor-β Signaling

1David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 3Hastings Center for Pulmonary Research, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, 4Department of Molecular Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo

JoVE 57577


 Biology

A Multimodal Imaging Approach Based on Micro-CT and Fluorescence Molecular Tomography for Longitudinal Assessment of Bleomycin-Induced Lung Fibrosis in Mice

1Corporate Preclinical R&D, Chiesi Farmaceutici S.p.A., 2Department of Veterinary Science, University of Parma, 3Department of Molecular Genetics, Erasmus MC, 4Department of Molecular Genetics, Vascular Surgery, Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, 5Fluidda NV

JoVE 56443


 Immunology and Infection

Detection of microRNA Expression in Peritoneal Membrane of Rats Using Quantitative Real-time PCR

1Division of Nephrology, First Department of Integrated Medicine, Saitama Medical Center, Jichi Medical University, 2Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Jichi Medical University, 3Department of Medical Physiology, Meiji Pharmaceutical University

JoVE 55505


 Genetics

Non-surgical Intratracheal Instillation of Mice with Analysis of Lungs and Lung Draining Lymph Nodes by Flow Cytometry

1Department of Immunology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, 2Division of Cell Biology, Department of Pediatrics, National Jewish Health, 3Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, Colorado State University, 4Department of Immunology, National Jewish Health

JoVE 2702


 Immunology and Infection

Phenotyping Mouse Pulmonary Function In Vivo with the Lung Diffusing Capacity

1Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, 2Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, 3Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

JoVE 52216


 Biology

Respiratory Exam I: Inspection and Palpation

JoVE 10028

Source: Suneel Dhand, MD, Attending Physician, Internal Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Disorders of the respiratory system with a chief complaint of shortness of breath are among the most common reasons for both outpatient and inpatient evaluation. The most obvious visible clue to a respiratory problem will be whether the patient is displaying any signs of respiratory distress, such as fast respiratory rate and/or cyanosis. In a clinical situation, this will always require emergent attention and oxygen therapy. Unlike pathology in other body systems, many pulmonary disorders, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and pneumonia, can be diagnosed by careful clinical examination alone. This starts with a comprehensive inspection and palpation. Keep in mind that in non-emergency situations the patient's complete history will have been taken already, gaining important insight into exposure histories (e.g., smoking), which could give rise to specific lung diseases. This history can then confirm physical findings as the examination is performed.


 Physical Examinations I

Respiratory Exam II: Percussion and Auscultation

JoVE 10041

Source: Suneel Dhand, MD, Attending Physician, Internal Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Learning the proper technique for percussion and auscultation of the respiratory system is vital and comes with practice on real patients. Percussion is a useful skill that is often skipped during everyday clinical practice, but if performed correctly, it can help the physician to identify underlying lung pathology. Auscultation can provide an almost immediate diagnosis for a number of acute pulmonary conditions, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, pneumonia, and pneumothorax. The areas for auscultating the lungs correspond to the lung zones. Each lung lobe can be pictured underneath the chest wall during percussion and auscultation (Figure 1). The right lung has three lobes: the superior, middle, and inferior lobes. The left lung has two lobes: the superior and inferior lobes. The superior lobe of the left lung also has a separate projection known as the lingual. Figure 1. Anatomy of lungs with respect to the chest wall. An approximate projection of lungs and their fissures and lobes


 Physical Examinations I

Murine Dermal Fibroblast Isolation by FACS

1Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 2Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, 3Department of Surgery, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawai'i

JoVE 53430


 Developmental Biology

Absorption of Nasal and Bronchial Fluids: Precision Sampling of the Human Respiratory Mucosa and Laboratory Processing of Samples

1National Heart and Lung Institute, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, St Mary's Hospital, 2St Mary's Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare Trust

JoVE 56413


 Medicine

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