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Pulmonary Valve: A valve situated at the entrance to the pulmonary trunk from the right ventricle.

Optimized Protocol for the Extraction of Proteins from the Human Mitral Valve

1Centro Cardiologico Monzino IRCCS, 2Cardiovascular Tissue Bank of Milan, Centro Cardiologico Monzino IRCCS, 3Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Cardiovascular Section, University of Milan, 4Department of Cardiovascular Disease, Development and Innovation Cardiac Surgery Unit, Centro Cardiologico Monzino IRCCS

JoVE 55762


 Biochemistry

Shunt Surgery, Right Heart Catheterization, and Vascular Morphometry in a Rat Model for Flow-induced Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

1Center for Congenital Heart Diseases, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Beatrix Children's Hospital, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, 2Research and Development Facility, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen

JoVE 55065


 Medicine

Cardiac Exam II: Auscultation

JoVE 10124

Source: Suneel Dhand, MD, Attending Physician, Internal Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Proficiency in the use of a stethoscope to listen to heart sounds and the ability to differentiate between normal and abnormal heart sounds are essential skills for any physician. Correct placement of the stethoscope on the chest corresponds to the sound of cardiac valves closing. The heart has two main sounds: S1 and S2. The first heart sound (S1) occurs as the mitral and tricuspid valves (atrioventricular valves) close after blood enters the ventricles. This represents the start of systole. The second heart sound (S2) occurs when the aortic and pulmonary valves (semilunar valves) close after blood has left the ventricles to enter the systemic and pulmonary circulation systems at the end of systole. Traditionally, the sounds are known as a "lub-dub." Auscultation of the heart is performed using both diaphragm and bell parts of the stethoscope chest piece. The diaphragm is most commonly used and is best for high-frequency sounds (such as S1 and S2) and murmurs of mitral regurgitation and aortic stenosis. The diaphragm should be pressed firmly against the chest wall. The bell best transmits low-frequency sounds (such as S3 and S4) and the murmur of mitral stenosis. The bell should be applied


 Physical Examinations I

High-frequency High-resolution Echocardiography: First Evidence on Non-invasive Repeated Measure of Myocardial Strain, Contractility, and Mitral Regurgitation in the Ischemia-reperfused Murine Heart

1Department of Surgery, The Ohio State University, 2Heart and Lung Research Institute, The Ohio State University, 3Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Ohio State University

JoVE 1781


 Medicine

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