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Radioactive Waste: Liquid, solid, or gaseous waste resulting from mining of radioactive ore, production of reactor fuel materials, reactor operation, processing of irradiated reactor fuels, and related operations, and from use of radioactive materials in research, industry, and medicine. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)

Rapid Detection of Neurodevelopmental Phenotypes in Human Neural Precursor Cells (NPCs)

1Department of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 2Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Department of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 3The Child Health Institute of NJ, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Services, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 4The Child Health Institute of NJ, Department of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 5Department of Genetics, Rutgers University

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JoVE 56628


 JoVE In-Press

Essential Metal Uptake in Gram-Negative Bacteria: X-Ray Fluorescence, Radioisotopes, and Cell Fractionation

1Graduate Biomedical Sciences Microbiology Theme, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 2Department of Radiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 3Office of the Provost, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 4Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 57169


 JoVE In-Press

Proper Waste Disposal

JoVE 10403

Robert M. Rioux and Taslima A. Zaman, Pennsylvania State University, Pennsylvania, PA

Users are responsible for the proper disposal of the waste generated during their work. Improper waste disposal may severely endanger public health and/or the environment. The handling of hazardous waste must be regulated from the moment of generation until its disposal at its offsite final destination facility. A waste management system must be devised before work begins on any laboratory activity. Users must comply with the rules and regulations of their institute's Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) office, which develops and implements proper waste management systems satisfying diverse regulations and standards, such as those imposed by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).


 Lab Safety

Determining Rate Laws and the Order of Reaction

JoVE 10193

Source: Laboratory of Dr. Neal Abrams — SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

All chemical reactions have a specific rate defining the progress of reactants going to products. This rate can be influenced by temperature, concentration, and the physical properties of the reactants. The rate also includes the intermediates and transition states that are formed but are neither the reactant nor the product. The rate law defines the role of each reactant in a reaction and can be used to mathematically model the time required for a reaction to proceed. The general form of a rate equation is shown below:     where A and B are concentrations of different molecular species, m and n are reaction orders, and k is the rate constant. The rate of nearly every reaction changes over time as reactants are depleted, making effective collisions less likely to occur. The rate constant, however, is fixed for any single reaction at a given temperature. The reaction order illustrates the number of molecular species involved in a reaction. It is very important to know the rate law, including rate constant and reaction order, which can only be deter


 General Chemistry

Measuring G-protein-coupled Receptor Signaling via Radio-labeled GTP Binding

1The Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 2Department of Neurology and neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 3Departments of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 4Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

JoVE 55561


 Biochemistry

Operating the Glovebox

JoVE 10378

Robert M Rioux, Ajay Sathe, Zhifeng Chen, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

A glovebox is an isolated enclosure that is designed to maintain an inert atmosphere. The manipulation of chemicals or apparatus is done via the use of gloves, which allow operation while still maintaining an inert atmosphere. A positive pressure is utilized to compensate for any passive leaks. Objects can be transferred in and out of the box using an antechamber that acts as an airlock between the box and the outside atmosphere1. A glovebox can have multiple pair(s) of gloves associated with it depending on the size of the box.


 Lab Safety

Methods for Analyzing the Impacts of Natural Uranium on In Vitro Osteoclastogenesis

1UMR E-4320 TIRO-MATOs CEA/DRF/BIAM, Université Nice Sophia-Antipolis, 2UMR 7272 Institut de Chimie de Nice CNRS, Université Nice Sophia-Antipolis, 3CEA, Direction de la Recherche Fondamentale (DRF), Biosciences and Biotechnologies Institute (BIAM)

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56499


 JoVE In-Press

Glucose Uptake Measurement and Response to Insulin Stimulation in In Vitro Cultured Human Primary Myotubes

1CarMeN Laboratory, INSERM U1060, INRA 1397, University of Lyon, 2Department of digestive and bariatric surgery, Obesity Integrated Center, University Hospital of Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon 1 University, 3Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, Hypertension and Nutrition, Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva

JoVE 55743


 Biology

Analysis of 18FDG PET/CT Imaging as a Tool for Studying Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection and Treatment in Non-human Primates

1Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 2Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

JoVE 56375


 Immunology and Infection

Proper Use of Autoclaves

JoVE 10381

Robert M. Rioux & Zhifeng Chen, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

Autoclaving is one of the most commonly used methods in the laboratory for the purpose of decontamination. The most common items decontaminated with an autoclave are those that contact biological samples (typically those containing microorganisms). An autoclave works by utilizing pressurized high temperature steam to kill microorganisms present in the loaded materials. Sufficient steam flow and heat transfer are essential for highly efficient autoclaving, which are the key principles to consider when packaging materials. Safety needs to be considered when working with an autoclave due to the high pressure and temperature employed therein, which also sets limits on which materials are compatible and may necessitate special attention when packaging, loading, and unloading materials.


 Lab Safety

Determination of the Transport Rate of Xenobiotics and Nanomaterials Across the Placenta using the ex vivo Human Placental Perfusion Model

1Department of Obstetrics, Perinatal Pharmacology, University Hospital Zurich, 2Laboratory for Materials - Biology Interactions, EMPA Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, 3Graduate School for Cellular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Bern

JoVE 50401


 Bioengineering

A Practical Guide on Coupling a Scanning Mobility Sizer and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (SMPS-ICPMS)

1Bioenergy and Catalysis Laboratory (LBK), Energy and Environment Research Division (ENE), Paul Scherrer Institute, 2Environmental Engineering Institute (IIE), School of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering (ENAC), École; Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), 3Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science ETH Zurich

JoVE 55487


 Chemistry

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