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Rotator Cuff: The musculotendinous sheath formed by the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, and teres minor muscles. These help stabilize the head of the Humerus in the glenoid fossa and allow for rotation of the Shoulder joint about its longitudinal axis.
 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations III

Shoulder Exam II

JoVE Science Education

Source: Robert E. Sallis, MD. Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California, USA

The shoulder exam continues by checking the strength of the rotator cuff muscles and biceps tendons. The rotator cuff muscles (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis) act as compressors, holding the humeral head in place against the glenoid. Injury and degeneration of the rotator cuff tendons are the most common sources of shoulder pain. The strength testing of the rotator muscle is performed by testing motions against resistance applied by the examiner. Pain with these resisted motions suggests tendonitis; weakness suggests a rotator cuff tear. The strength tested is followed by tests for impingement syndrome, shoulder instability, and labrum injury. It is important to test both of the shoulders and compare between the sides. The opposite shoulder should be used as the standard to evaluate the injured shoulder, provided it has not been injured as well.

 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations III

Shoulder Exam I

JoVE Science Education

Source: Robert E. Sallis, MD. Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California, USA

Examination of the shoulder can be complex, because it actually consists of four separate joints: are the glenohumeral (GH) joint, the acromioclavicular (AC) joint, the sternoclavicular joint, and the scapulothoracic joint. The GH joint is primarily responsible for shoulder motion and is the most mobile joint in the body. It has been likened to a golf ball sitting on a tee and is prone to instability. It is held in place by the four rotator cuff muscles (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis), along with the GH ligaments. The shoulder exam begins with the inspection and palpation of the key anatomic landmarks, followed by an assessment of the patient's range of motion. The opposite shoulder should be used as the standard to evaluate the injured shoulder, provided it has not been previously injured.

 JoVE Bioengineering

Measurement of Maximum Isometric Force Generated by Permeabilized Skeletal Muscle Fibers

1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Michigan Medical School, 2Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan Medical School, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan Medical School, 4Department of Surgery, Section of Plastic Surgery, University of Michigan Medical School


JoVE 52695

 JoVE Neuroscience

Kinematics and Ground Reaction Force Determination: A Demonstration Quantifying Locomotor Abilities of Young Adult, Middle-aged, and Geriatric Rats

1CullenWebb Animal Neurology & Ophthalmology Center, Riverview, NB, 2Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3Department of Comparative Biology and Experimental Medicine, University of Calgary, 4Department of Neuroscience, University of Calgary


JoVE 2138

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 JoVE Medicine

Ultrasound Assessment of Flow-Mediated Dilation of the Brachial and Superficial Femoral Arteries in Rats

1Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah, 2Department of Kinesiology and Health Education, University of Texas at Austin, 3Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of Utah, 4Department of Biochemistry, University of Utah, 5Department of Exercise and Sport Science, University of Utah, 6Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Department of Veterans Affairs


JoVE 54762

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 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations I

Blood Pressure Measurement

JoVE Science Education

Source: Meghan Fashjian, ACNP-BC, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston MA

The term blood pressure (BP) describes lateral pressures produced by blood upon the vessel walls. BP is a vital sign obtained routinely in hospital and outpatient settings, and is one of the most common medical assessments performed around the world. It can be determined directly with the intra-arterial catheter or by indirect method, which is a non-invasive, safe, easily reproducible, and thus most used technique. One of the most important applications of BP measurements is the screening, diagnosis, and monitoring of hypertension, a condition that affects almost one third of the U.S. adult population and is one of the leading causes of the cardiovascular disease. BP can be measured automatically by oscillometry or manually by auscultation utilizing a sphygmomanometer, a device with an inflatable cuff to collapse the artery and a manometer to measure the pressure. Determination of the pulse-obliterating pressure by palpation is done prior to auscultation to give a rough estimate of the target systolic pressure. Next, the examiner places a stethoscope over the brachial artery of the patient, inflates the cuff above the expected systolic pressure, and then auscultates while deflating the cuff and o

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 JoVE Medicine

Implantation of a Carotid Cuff for Triggering Shear-stress Induced Atherosclerosis in Mice

1European Institute for Molecular Imaging, Westfälische Wilhelms-University Münster, 2British Heart Foundation Cardiovascular Sciences Unit, Imperial College London, 3Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London, 4Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology


JoVE 3308

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 JoVE Medicine

Heterotopic Cervical Heart Transplantation in Mice

1Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Division of Experimental Surgery, German Heart Center Munich, Technische Universität München, 2Institute of Pathology, Helmholtz Zentrum Munich, 3Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Division of Experimental Surgery, German Heart Center Munich, Technische Universität München, 4Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, General Hospital Linz


JoVE 52907

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 JoVE Medicine

A Novel Microsurgical Model for Heterotopic, En Bloc Chest Wall, Thymus, and Heart Transplantation in Mice

1Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 2Burn and Complex Wound Center, 3Section of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Chicago Medical Center, 4Division of Plastic, Reconstructive, and Maxillofacial Surgery, R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, 5Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 6Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation (VCA) Lab, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine


JoVE 53442

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 JoVE Medicine

Orthotopic Hind Limb Transplantation in the Mouse

1Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation (VCA) Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 2Department of Visceral, Transplant and Thoracic Surgery, Innsbruck Medical University, 3Center for Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and School of Medicine, 4Department of General, Visceral and Transplant Surgery, Charite Berlin


JoVE 53483

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 JoVE Medicine

Murine Cervical Heart Transplantation Model Using a Modified Cuff Technique

1Center of Operative Medicine, Department of Visceral, Transplant and Thoracic Surgery, Innsbruck Medical University, 2Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine


JoVE 50753

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 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations I

Peripheral Vascular Exam Using a Continuous Wave Doppler

JoVE Science Education

Source: Joseph Donroe, MD, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT

Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is a common condition affecting older adults and includes disease of the peripheral arteries and veins. While the history and physical exam offer clues to its diagnosis, Doppler ultrasound has become a routine part of the bedside vascular examination. The video titled "The Peripheral Vascular Exam" gave a detailed review of the physical examination of the peripheral arterial and venous systems. This video specifically reviews the bedside assessment of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and chronic venous insufficiency using a handheld continuous wave Doppler. The handheld Doppler (HHD) is a simple instrument that utilizes continuous transmission and reception of ultrasound (also referred to as continuous wave Doppler) to detect changes in blood velocity as it courses through a vessel. The Doppler probe contains a transmitting element that emits ultrasound and a receiving element that detects ultrasound waves (Figure 1). The emitted ultrasound is reflected off of moving blood and back to the probe at a frequency directly related to the velocity of blood flow. The reflected signal is detected and transduced to an audible sound with a frequen

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 JoVE In-Press

Non-invasive Assessments of Subjective and Objective Recovery Characteristics Following an Exhaustive Jump Protocol

1Department of Business Economics, Health and Social Care, University of Applied Sciences and Arts of Southern Switzerland, 2University College Physiotherapy "Thim van der Laan", 3Department of Movement and Sport Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 4Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 55612

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 Science Education:

Central Venous Access Device Dressing Change

JoVE Science Education

Source: Madeline Lassche, MSNEd, RN and Katie Baraki, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, University of Utah, UT

Central venous access devices (CVAD), commonly known as central lines or central catheters, are large-bore intravenous (IV) catheters that are introduced into the central circulation. Typically, CVADs terminate in the superior vena cava, just outside of the right atrium of the heart, but they may also terminate in any one of the great veins (i.e., aorta, inferior vena cava, brachiocephalic vein, pulmonary artery, internal iliac vein, or common femoral vein). Patients may need a CVAD for any number of reasons. CVADs allow for the rapid infusion of fluids to treat significant hypovolemia or shock. They are also beneficial when administering vasoactive medications, highly concentrated medications, total parenteral nutrition (TPN), or chemotherapy, because the increased blood volume in these areas allows for the hemodilution of these potentially caustic or reactive agents. Patients who must receive multiple non-compatible IV medications, those that require long-term IV medications, or those with limited vascular access may also require the placement of a CVAD. These devices may be tunneled (i.e., inserted into a vein at one location and tunneled under the skin to emerge through the skin at another site)

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 JoVE Medicine

Murine Kidney Transplant Technique

1Colorado Center for Transplantation Care, Research and Education, University of Colorado, Denver, 2Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine, University of Colorado, Denver, 3Department of Medicine, Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, Medical Center and University of Colorado, Denver, 4Department of Surgery, Division of Transplant Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, University of Colorado-Denver, 5Renal Section, Denver Veterans Affairs Medical Center


JoVE 52848

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 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Orthotopic Hind-Limb Transplantation in Rats

1Department of Visceral, Transplant, and Thoracic Surgery, Daniel Swarovski Research Laboratory, Innsbruck Medical University, 2Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center


JoVE 2022

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 Science Education: Essentials of Emergency Medicine and Critical Care

Open Cricothyrotomy

JoVE Science Education

Source: James W Bonz, MD, Emergency Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

Open cricothyrotomy is an emergent surgical procedure. It is performed to establish an airway access by passage of a tube through an incision in the cricothyroid membrane. This is a procedure of choice in the feared "can't intubate, can't ventilate" scenario - when all other forms of endotracheal intubation have failed and the spontaneous ventilation is worsening or has become impossible. The airway access is established via the tracheostomy tube. The tracheostomy tube consists of three parts: an outer cannula (or the tracheostomy tube itself), an inner cannula, and an obturator. During the procedure, the obturator is placed within the tracheostomy tube to guide the insertion, while the inner cannula is removed. The distal end of the obturator is rounded and protrudes through the end of the tracheostomy tube, allowing the practitioner to easily guide the tube into place without it being caught on the surrounding structures. In addition, the obturator prevents the tube clogging with tissue or the fluids during an insertion. Once the tube is placed, the obturator is removed and the inner cannula is placed within the tracheostomy tube. Alternatively, the procedure can be performed using the mo

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 JoVE Bioengineering

Novel Atomic Force Microscopy Based Biopanning for Isolation of Morphology Specific Reagents against TDP-43 Variants in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

1School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, 2Department of Neurology, Georgetown University Medical Center, 3Department of Pathology, Georgetown University Medical Center


JoVE 52584

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