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Rotator Cuff: The musculotendinous sheath formed by the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, and teres minor muscles. These help stabilize the head of the Humerus in the glenoid fossa and allow for rotation of the Shoulder joint about its longitudinal axis.

Shoulder Exam II

JoVE 10185

Source: Robert E. Sallis, MD. Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California, USA

The shoulder exam continues by checking the strength of the rotator cuff muscles and biceps tendons. The rotator cuff muscles (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis) act as compressors, holding the humeral head in place against the glenoid. Injury and degeneration of the rotator cuff tendons are the most common sources of shoulder pain. The strength testing of the rotator muscle is performed by testing motions against resistance applied by the examiner. Pain with these resisted motions suggests tendonitis; weakness suggests a rotator cuff tear. The strength tested is followed by tests for impingement syndrome, shoulder instability, and labrum injury. It is important to test both of the shoulders and compare between the sides. The opposite shoulder should be used as the standard to evaluate the injured shoulder, provided it has not been injured as well.


 Physical Examinations III

Shoulder Exam I

JoVE 10173

Source: Robert E. Sallis, MD. Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California, USA

Examination of the shoulder can be complex, because it actually consists of four separate joints: are the glenohumeral (GH) joint, the acromioclavicular (AC) joint, the sternoclavicular joint, and the scapulothoracic joint. The GH joint is primarily responsible for shoulder motion and is the most mobile joint in the body. It has been likened to a golf ball sitting on a tee and is prone to instability. It is held in place by the four rotator cuff muscles (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis), along with the GH ligaments. The shoulder exam begins with the inspection and palpation of the key anatomic landmarks, followed by an assessment of the patient's range of motion. The opposite shoulder should be used as the standard to evaluate the injured shoulder, provided it has not been previously injured.


 Physical Examinations III

Measurement of Maximum Isometric Force Generated by Permeabilized Skeletal Muscle Fibers

1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Michigan Medical School, 2Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan Medical School, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan Medical School, 4Department of Surgery, Section of Plastic Surgery, University of Michigan Medical School

JoVE 52695


 Bioengineering

Kinematics and Ground Reaction Force Determination: A Demonstration Quantifying Locomotor Abilities of Young Adult, Middle-aged, and Geriatric Rats

1CullenWebb Animal Neurology & Ophthalmology Center, Riverview, NB, 2Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3Department of Comparative Biology and Experimental Medicine, University of Calgary, 4Department of Neuroscience, University of Calgary

JoVE 2138


 Neuroscience

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