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Schwann Cells: Neuroglial cells of the peripheral nervous system which form the insulating myelin sheaths of peripheral axons.

Glial Cells

JoVE 10843

Glial cells are one of the two main types of cells in the nervous system. Glia cells comprise astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia, and ependymal cells in the central nervous system, and satellite and Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system. These cells do not communicate via electrical signals like neurons do, but they contribute to virtually every other aspect of nervous system function. In humans, the number of glial cells is roughly equal to the number of neurons in the brain. Glia in the central nervous system (CNS) include astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia, and ependymal cells. Astrocytes are the most abundant type of glial cell and are found in organized, non-overlapping patterns throughout the brain, where they closely associate with neurons and capillaries. Astrocytes play numerous roles in brain function, including regulating blood flow and metabolic processes, synaptic ion and pH homeostasis, and blood-brain barrier maintenance. Another specialized glial cell, the oligodendrocyte, forms the myelin sheath that surrounds neuronal axons in the CNS. Oligodendrocytes extend long cellular processes that wrap around axons multiple times to form this coating. Myelin sheath is required for proper conduction of neuronal signaling and greatly increases the speed at which these messages travel. Microglia—known as the macrop

 Core: Nervous System

What is a Nervous System?

JoVE 10838

The nervous system is the collection of specialized cells responsible for maintaining an organism’s internal environment and coordinating the interaction of an organism with the external world—from the control of essential functions such as heart rate and breathing to the movement needed to escape danger.

The vertebrate nervous system is divided into two major parts: the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS). The CNS includes the brain, spinal cord, and retina—the sensory tissue of the visual system. The PNS contains the sensory receptor cells for all of the other sensory systems—such as the touch receptors in the skin—as well as the nerves that carry information between the CNS and the rest of the body. Additionally, part of both the CNS and PNS contribute to the autonomic nervous system (also known as the visceral motor system). The autonomic nervous system controls smooth muscles, cardiac muscles, and glands that govern involuntary actions, such as digestion. The vertebrate brain is primarily divided into the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brainstem. The cerebrum is the largest, most anterior part of the brain that is divided into left and right hemispheres. Each hemisphere is further divided into four lobes: frontal, parietal, occipital, and temporal. The outermost layer of the cerebrum is called

 Core: Nervous System

Action Potentials

JoVE 10844

Neurons communicate by firing action potentials—the electrochemical signal that is propagated along the axon. The signal results in the release of neurotransmitters at axon terminals, thereby transmitting information in the nervous system. An action potential is a specific “all-or-none” change in membrane potential that results in a rapid spike in voltage.

Neurons typically have a resting membrane potential of about -70 millivolts (mV). When they receive signals—for instance, from neurotransmitters or sensory stimuli—their membrane potential can hyperpolarize (become more negative) or depolarize (become more positive), depending on the nature of the stimulus. If the membrane becomes depolarized to a specific threshold potential, voltage-gated sodium (Na+) channels open in response. Na+ has a higher concentration outside of the cell as compared to the inside, so it rushes in when the channels open, moving down its electrochemical gradient. As positive charge flows in, the membrane potential becomes even more depolarized, in turn opening more channels. As a result, the membrane potential quickly rises to a peak of around +40 mV. At the peak of the action potential, several factors drive the potential back down. The influx of Na+ slows because the Na+ channels start to inactiv

 Core: Nervous System

A Unified Methodological Framework for Vestibular Schwannoma Research

1Eaton Peabody Laboratories, Department of Otolaryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear, 2Department of Otolaryngology, Harvard Medical School, 3Department of Otolaryngology, Vienna General Hospital, Medical University of Vienna, 4Program in Speech and Hearing Bioscience and Technology, Harvard Medical School

JoVE 55827

 Cancer Research

TIRFM and pH-sensitive GFP-probes to Evaluate Neurotransmitter Vesicle Dynamics in SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells: Cell Imaging and Data Analysis

1Department of Pharmacological and Biomolecular Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, 2San Raffaele Scientific Institute and Vita-Salute University, 3CEND Center of Excellence in Neurodegenerative Diseases, Università degli Studi di Milano

JoVE 52267

 Neuroscience

Droplet Barcoding-Based Single Cell Transcriptomics of Adult Mammalian Tissues

1Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, 2Department of Comparative Biology and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Calgary, 3Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute, University of Calgary, 4Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary

JoVE 58709

 Biology

An Enzyme- and Serum-free Neural Stem Cell Culture Model for EMT Investigation Suited for Drug Discovery

1Dept. of Biomedicine, Pharmacenter, University of Basel, 2Molecular Signalling and Gene Therapy, Narayana Nethralaya Foundation, Narayana Health City, 3Brain Ischemia and Regeneration, Department of Biomedicine, University Hospital Basel, 4Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum Idar-Oberstein, 5Department of Neurosurgery and Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University, 6Department of Neurology, Laboratory of Molecular Neuro Oncology, University Hospital of Zurich

JoVE 54018

 Developmental Biology

Spinal Cord Lateral Hemisection and Asymmetric Behavioral Assessments in Adult Rats

1Department of Spinal Cord Injury and Repair, Trauma and Orthopedics Institute of Chinese PLA, General Hospital of Jinan Military Region, 2Institute of Military Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, 3Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research Group, Stark Neurosciences Research Institute, Department of Neurological Surgery and Goodman Campbell Brain and Spine, Indiana University School of Medicine, 4Program in Medical Neuroscience, Paul and Carole Stark Neurosciences Research Institute, Indiana University School of Medicine, 5Shandong University Affiliated Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 57126

 JoVE In-Press

Ethanol-Induced Cervical Sympathetic Ganglion Block Applications for Promoting Canine Inferior Alveolar Nerve Regeneration Using an Artificial Nerve

1Department of Dental Anesthesia, Nippon Dental University Hospital at Tokyo, 2Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Nippon Dental University School of Life Dentistry at Tokyo, 3Department of Bioartificial Organs, Institute for Frontier Medical Science, Kyoto University

JoVE 58039

 Neuroscience

Characterization of the Interaction of Primary Cells from the Rat Inner Ear with Polymer Films As Coatings for Cochlear Implant Electrode Surface

1Institute of Neuroanatomy and Cell Biology, Hannover Medical School, 2Institute for Technical Chemistry, University of Technology Braunschweig, 3Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Hannover Medical School

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56792

 JoVE In-Press

Whole-mount Confocal Microscopy for Adult Ear Skin: A Model System to Study Neuro-vascular Branching Morphogenesis and Immune Cell Distribution

1Laboratory of Stem Cell and Neuro-Vascular Biology, Genetics and Developmental Biology Center, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, 2Earle A. Chiles Research Institute, Robert W. Franz Cancer Center, Providence Portland Medical Center

JoVE 57406

 Developmental Biology

High Resolution 3D Imaging of the Human Pancreas Neuro-insular Network

1Department of Pathology, Immunology and Experimental Medicine, University of Florida, 2Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University, 3Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Florida, 4Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Florida, 5Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Florida

JoVE 56859

 Bioengineering

Transplantation of Schwann Cells Inside PVDF-TrFE Conduits to Bridge Transected Rat Spinal Cord Stumps to Promote Axon Regeneration Across the Gap

1The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 2Department of Materials Science and Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 4Department of Cell Biology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 5Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

JoVE 56077

 Medicine
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