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Signal-To-Noise Ratio: The comparison of the quantity of meaningful data to the irrelevant or incorrect data.

Tandem Mass Spectrometry

JoVE 5690

In tandem mass spectrometry a biomolecule of interest is isolated from a biological sample, and then fragmented into multiple subunits in order to help elucidate its composition and sequence. This is accomplished by having mass spectrometers in series. The first spectrometer ionizes a sample and filter ions of a specific mass to charge ratio. Filtered ions are then fragmented and passed to a second mass spectrometer where the fragments are analyzed. This video introduces the principles of tandem mass spectrometry, including mass-to-ratio selection and dissociation methods. Also shown is a general procedure for analyzing a biochemical compound using tandem mass spectrometry with collision-induced dissociation. The applications section covers selection reaction monitoring, determination of protein post-translation modifications, and detection of tacrolimus levels in blood. Tandem mass spectrometry links together multiple stages of mass spectrometry to first isolate a biomolecule, and then determine aspects of its chemical makeup. Biomolecules have large, complex structures, making it difficult to determine their molecular composition. Tandem mass spectrometry selects a molecule of interest that is later fragmented into multiple subunits, which can help elucidate its identification and sequence. This video will show the


 Biochemistry

X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

JoVE 10474

Source: Faisal Alamgir, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a technique that measures the elemental composition, empirical formula, chemical state and electronic state of the elements that exist within a material. XPS spectra are obtained by irradiating a material with a beam of X-rays while simultaneously measuring the kinetic energy and number of electrons that escape from the top several nanometers of the material being analyzed (within ~ the top 10 nm, for typical kinetic energies of the electrons). Due to the fact that the signal electrons escape predominantly from within the first few nanometers of the material, XPS is considered a surface analytical technique. The discovery and the application of the physical principles behind XPS or, as it was known earlier, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), led to two Nobel prizes in physics. The first was awarded in 1921 to Albert Einstein for his explanation of the photoelectric effect in 1905. The photoelectric effect underpins the process by which signal is generated in XPS. Much later, Kai Siegbahn developed ESCA based on some of the early works by Innes, Moseley, Rawlinson and Robinson, and recorded, in 1954, the first high-ener


 Materials Engineering

Visual Attention: fMRI Investigation of Object-based Attentional Control

JoVE 10272

Source: Laboratories of Jonas T. Kaplan and Sarah I. Gimbel— University of Southern California

The human visual system is incredibly sophisticated and capable of processing large amounts of information very quickly. However, the brain's capacity to process information is not an unlimited resource. Attention, the ability to selectively process information that is relevant to current goals and to ignore information that is not, is therefore an essential part of visual perception. Some aspects of attention are automatic, while others are subject to voluntary, conscious control. In this experiment we explore the mechanisms of voluntary, or "top-down" attentional control on visual processing. This experiment leverages the orderly organization of visual cortex to examine how top-down attention can selectively modulate the processing of visual stimuli. Certain regions of the visual cortex appear to be specialized for processing specific visual items. Specifically, work by Kanwisher et al.1 has identified an area in the fusiform gyrus of the inferior temporal lobe that is significantly more active when subjects view faces compared to when they observe other common objects. This area has come to be known as the Fusiform Face Area (FFA). Another brain region, known as the Para


 Neuropsychology

Motor Maps

JoVE 10175

Source: Laboratories of Jonas T. Kaplan and Sarah I. Gimbel—University of Southern California

One principle of brain organization is the topographic mapping of information. Especially in sensory and motor cortices, adjacent regions of the brain tend to represent information from adjacent parts of the body, resulting in maps of the body expressed on the surface of the brain. The primary sensory and motor maps in the brain surround a prominent sulcus known as the central sulcus. The cortex anterior to the central sulcus is known as the precentral gyrus and contains the primary motor cortex, while the cortex posterior to the central sulcus is known as the postcentral gyrus and contains the primary sensory cortex (Figure 1). Figure 1: Sensory and motor maps around the central sulcus. The primary motor cortex, which contains a motor map of the body's effectors, is anterior to the central sulcus, in the precentral gyrus of the frontal lobe. The primary somesthetic (sensory) cortex, which receives touch, pain, and temperature information from the external parts of the body, is located posterior to the central sulcus, in the postcentral gyrus of the parietal lobe.

Visualization of Cortex Organization and Dynamics in Microorganisms, using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy

1AG Cellular Dynamics and Cell Patterning, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, 2Helmholtz Zentrum München

JoVE 3982


 Bioengineering

Learning and Memory: The Remember-Know Task

JoVE 10212

Source: Laboratories of Jonas T. Kaplan and Sarah I. Gimbel—University of Southern California

Our experience of memory is varied and complex. Sometimes we remember events in vivid detail, while other times we may only have a vague sense of familiarity. Memory researchers have made a distinction between memories that are recollected versus those that are familiar. A recollected item is one that is not only remembered, but carries with it details of the time at which it was learned or encoded. Like a recollected item, a familiar item is also remembered, but is void of any details about the circumstances surrounding its encoding. Many studies of recollection and familiarity have focused on the medial temporal lobe (MTL), specifically the hippocampus, since its involvement in memory encoding, consolidation, and retrieval is well-known and well-studied.1-3 This video shows how to administer the Remember-Know task4 to compare brain activation in these two types of memory retrieval. In this context, remember is another term for recollection, while know refers to memories that are familiar but not explicitly recollected. In this version of the Remember-Know task, participants are exposed to a series of color images, and asked to remember what they see. Inside


 Neuropsychology

Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Blood Flow in a Cerebral Aneurysm

JoVE 10479

The objective of this video is to describe recent advancements of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations based on patient- or animal-specific vasculature. Here, subject-based vessel segmentations were created, and, using a combination of open-source and commercial tools, a high-resolution numerical solution was determined within a flow model. Numerous studies have demonstrated that the hemodynamic conditions within the vasculature affect the development and progression of atherosclerosis, aneurysms, and other peripheral artery diseases; concomitantly, direct measurements of intraluminal pressure, wall shear stress (WSS), and particle residence time (PRT) are difficult to acquire in vivo. CFD allow such variables to be assessed non-invasively. In addition, CFD is used to simulate surgical techniques, which provides physicians better foresight regarding post-operative flow conditions. Two methods in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) with either time of flight (TOF-MRA) or contrast-enhanced MRA (CE-MRA) and phase-contrast (PC-MRI), allow us to obtain vessel geometries and time-resolved 3D velocity fields, respectively. TOF-MRA is based on the suppression of the signal from static tissue by repeated RF pulses that are applied to the imaged volume. A signal is obtained from un


 Biomedical Engineering

X-ray Fluorescence (XRF)

JoVE 5498

Source: Laboratory of Dr. Lydia Finney — Argonne National Laboratory

X-ray fluorescence is an induced, emitted radiation that can be used to generate spectroscopic information. X-ray fluorescence microscopy is a non-destructive imaging technique that uses the induced fluorescence emission of metals to identify and quantify their spatial distribution.


 Analytical Chemistry

Measuring Turbulent Flows

JoVE 10450

Source: Ricardo Mejia-Alvarez and Hussam Hikmat Jabbar, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI

Turbulent flows exhibit very high frequency fluctuations that require instruments with high time-resolution for their appropriate characterization. Hot-wire anemometers have a short enough time-response to fulfill this requirement. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate the use of hot-wire anemometry to characterize a turbulent jet. In this experiment, a previously calibrated hot-wire probe will be used to obtain velocity measurements at different positions within the jet. Finally, we will demonstrate a basic statistical analysis of the data to characterize the turbulent field.


 Mechanical Engineering

High-throughput Detection Method for Influenza Virus

1Laboratory of Molecular Immunology and Immunotherapy, Blood Research Institute, 2Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, 3Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Blood Research Institute, 4City of Milwaukee Health Department Laboratory, 5Division of Hematology-Oncology/BMT, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, Medical College of Wisconsin, 6Division of Hematology and Oncology, Dept Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin

JoVE 3623


 Immunology and Infection

Thermal Diffusivity and the Laser Flash Method

JoVE 10488

Source: Elise S.D. Buki, Danielle N. Beatty, and Taylor D. Sparks, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

The laser flash method (LFA) is a technique used to measure thermal diffusivity, a material specific property. Thermal diffusivity (α) is the ratio of how much heat is conducted relative to how much heat is stored in a material. It is related to thermal conductivity (), how much heat is transferred through a material due to a temperature gradient, by the following relationship: (Equation 1) where ⍴ is the density of the material and Cp is the specific heat capacity of the material at the given temperature of interest. Both thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity are important material properties used to assess how materials transfer heat (thermal energy) and react to changes in temperature. Thermal diffusivity measurements are obtained most commonly by the thermal or laser flash method. In this technique a sample is heated by pulsing it with a laser or xenon flash on one side but not the other, thus inducing a temperature gradient. This temperatu


 Materials Engineering

Non-contact, Label-free Monitoring of Cells and Extracellular Matrix using Raman Spectroscopy

1Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery and Inter-University Centre for Medical Technology Stuttgart-Tübingen (IZST), Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen, 2Department of Cell and Tissue Engineering, Fraunhofer Institute of Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology (IGB) Stuttgart, Germany, 3Department for Medical Interfacial Engineering (IGVT), University of Stuttgart, Germany, 4Institute of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Julius-Maximillians University, Würzburg, Germany

JoVE 3977


 Bioengineering

Generation and Coherent Control of Pulsed Quantum Frequency Combs

1Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique - Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications (INRS-EMT), 2School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, 3Department of Energy, Information Engineering and Mathematical Models, University of Palermo, 4School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Sussex, 5Department of Physics and Material Science, City University of Hong Kong, 6State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi'an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Science, 7Centre for Micro Photonics, Swinburne University of Technology, 8Institute of Photonics, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, 9Institute of Fundamental and Frontier Sciences, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, 10National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics

JoVE 57517


 Engineering

Imaging Membrane Potential with Two Types of Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Voltage Sensors

1Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, 2Center for Functional Connectomics, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 3College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, 4Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology

JoVE 53566


 Neuroscience

Highly Resolved Intravital Striped-illumination Microscopy of Germinal Centers

1Biophysical Analytics, German Rheumatism Research Center, Leibniz Institute, 2Microscopy Core Facility, Max-Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, 3Immunodynamics, German Rheumatism Research Center, Leibniz Institute, 4LaVision Biotec GmbH, 5Immunodynamics and Intravital Imaging, Charité - University of Medicine

JoVE 51135


 Immunology and Infection

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