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Signs and Symptoms: Clinical manifestations that can be either objective when observed by a physician, or subjective when perceived by the patient.

Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Insertion

JoVE 10264

Source: Madeline Lassche, MSNEd, RN and Katie Baraki, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, University of Utah, UT

The purpose of peripheral intravenous catheter (PIV) insertion is to infuse medications, perform intravenous (IV) fluid therapy, or inject radioactive tracers for special examination procedures. Placing a PIV is an invasive procedure and requires the use of an aseptic, no-touch technique. Common IV venipuncture sites are the arms and hands in adults and the feet in children. According to the Intravenous Nurses Society (INS), the feet should be avoided in the adult population because of the risk of thrombophlebitis. Venipuncture sites should be carefully assessed for contraindications, such as pain, wounds, decreased circulation, a previous cerebral vascular accident (CVA), dialysis fistulas, or a mastectomy on the same side. The median cubital vein and the cephalic vein in the wrist area should be avoided when possible. The cephalic vein has been associated with nerve damage when used for IV placements. The most distal site available on the hand or arm is preferred so that future venipuncture sites may be used if infiltration or extravasation occurs. This video will demonstrate the insertion of a PIV, including the preparation and attachment of an IV extension s


 Nursing Skills

Adapted Resistance Training Improves Strength in Eight Weeks in Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis

1Motion Analysis Laboratory, Kennedy Krieger Institute, 2Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 3Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 4Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

JoVE 53449


 Medicine

Discontinuing Intravenous Fluids and a Peripheral Intravenous Line

JoVE 10278

Source: Madeline Lassche, MSNEd, RN and Katie Baraki, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, University of Utah, UT

Intravenous (IV) fluid administration and peripheral IV catheters (PIVs) may be discontinued for a number of reasons. The most common reason for discontinuing IV fluids is that the patient has returned to normal body fluid volume (euvolemia) and is able to maintain adequate oral fluid intake or is being discharged from the hospital. In addition, the Centers for Disease Control Guidelines for the Prevention of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections (2011) recommends replacing PIVs every 72-96 h in adults to prevent the risk of infection or phlebitis. If the PIV becomes dislodged or if the insertion site demonstrates the signs and symptoms of infection, infiltration, extravasation, or phlebitis, the PIV should be discontinued and replaced. For pediatric patients, the Infusion Nurses Society recommends replacing the PIV only when the IV infusion site is no longer patent or when it demonstrates the signs and symptoms of complications. This video describes the approach to discontinue IV fluid administration and PIVs.


 Nursing Skills

Thyroid Exam

JoVE 10098

Source: Richard Glickman-Simon, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, MA

The thyroid gland is located in the neck anterior trachea between the cricoid cartilage (above) and the suprasternal notch (below) (Figure 1). It consists of a right and left lobe connected by an isthmus. The isthmus covers the second, third, and fourth tracheal rings, and the lobes curve posteriorly around the sides of the trachea and esophagus. The normal gland, weighing 10 - 25 g, is usually invisible on inspection and often difficult to palpate. A goiter is an enlarged thyroid from any cause. In addition to assessing its size, it is important to palpate the thyroid for its shape, mobility, consistency, and tenderness. A normal thyroid is soft, smooth, symmetrical, and non-tender, and it slides upward slightly when swallowing. Symmetrical enlargement of a soft, smooth thyroid suggests endemic hypothyroidism due to iodine deficiency or one of two prevalent autoimmune disorders: Graves' disease or Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Thyroid nodules are common and usually incidental; however, 10% of thyroid nodules turn out to be malignant. They may be single or multiple, and are most often firm and non-tender. A tender, symmetrical goiter typically indicates thyr


 Physical Examinations II

Non-invasive Assessments of Subjective and Objective Recovery Characteristics Following an Exhaustive Jump Protocol

1Department of Business Economics, Health and Social Care, University of Applied Sciences and Arts of Southern Switzerland, 2University College Physiotherapy "Thim van der Laan", 3Department of Movement and Sport Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 4Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp

JoVE 55612


 Medicine

Assessing and Flushing a Peripheral Intravenous Line

JoVE 10265

Source: Madeline Lassche, MSNEd, RN and Katie Baraki, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, University of Utah, UT

After peripheral intravenous (IV) access is initiated, it is important to assess and maintain the IV catheter according to institutional policies and nursing standards of practice. The regular assessment of the insertion site and the surrounding areas for signs of complications is necessary to prevent IV catheter complications, including infiltration, phlebitis, infection, extravasation, or catheter dislodgement. Routine IV maintenance is equally important to preserve line patency and to reduce the risk of occlusion, thrombosis, and thrombophlebitis. According to the CDC, peripheral IV catheters (PIV) may be kept in place for as long as 96 h, with proper care and maintenance. In addition, according to the Infusion Nurses Society (INS), a pediatric patient IV catheter may be kept in place until the IV line is no longer patent or it demonstrates complications. Routine rotation every 96 h is not indicated in the pediatric population due to increased anxiety caused by needle sticks. This video demonstrates the assessment and maintenance of peripheral IV lines, including general considerations before initiating the procedure, assessing the injection site for associated complications, and ma


 Nursing Skills

Lateral Canthotomy and Inferior Cantholysis

JoVE 10266

Source: James W Bonz, MD, Emergency Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

Lateral canthotomy is a potentially eyesight-saving procedure when performed emergently for an orbital compartment syndrome. An orbital compartment syndrome results from a buildup of pressure behind the eye; as pressure mounts, both the optic nerve and its vascular supply are compressed, rapidly leading to nerve damage and blindness if the pressure is not quickly relieved. The medial and lateral canthal tendons hold the eyelids firmly in place forming an anatomical compartment with limited space for the globe. In an orbital compartment syndrome, pressure rapidly increases as the globe is forced against the eyelids. Lateral canthotomy is the procedure by which the lateral canthal tendon is severed, thereby releasing the globe from its fixed position. Often, severing of the lateral canthal tendon alone is not enough to release the globe and the inferior portion (inferior crus) of the lateral canthal tendon also needs to be severed (inferior cantholysis). This increases precious space behind the eye by allowing the globe to become more proptotic, resulting in decompression. Most frequently, orbital compartment syndrome is the result of acute facial trauma, with the subsequent development of a retrobulbar


 Emergency Medicine and Critical Care

A Multicenter MRI Protocol for the Evaluation and Quantification of Deep Vein Thrombosis

1Department of Radiology, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 2Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 3Daiichi Sankyo Pharma Development

JoVE 52761


 Medicine

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