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Pulling Membrane Nanotubes from Giant Unilamellar Vesicles

1Laboratoire Physico Chimie Curie, Institut Curie, PSL Research University, 2Department of Genetics and Complex Diseases, T. H. Chan School of Public Health, and Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, 3Sorbonne Universités, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4Center for studies in Physics and Biology, The Rockefeller University

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56086


 JoVE In-Press

Multifunctional, Micropipette-based Method for Incorporation And Stimulation of Bacterial Mechanosensitive Ion Channels in Droplet Interface Bilayers

1Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 2School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 3Department of Biology, University of Maryland, 4College of Engineering, University of Georgia, 5Department of Engineering Sciences and Mechanics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

JoVE 53362


 Biology

Contractility Measurements of Human Uterine Smooth Muscle to Aid Drug Development

1Harris-Wellbeing Preterm Birth Research Centre, Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, 2School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Queensland, 3Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, 4Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56639


 JoVE In-Press

Myo-mechanical Analysis of Isolated Skeletal Muscle

1Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California San Francisco, 2Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Francisco, 3Department of Biology, San Francisco State University, 4Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, 5Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine & Stem Cell Research, University of California San Francisco

JoVE 2582


 Medicine

Force and Acceleration

JoVE 10346

Source: Nicholas Timmons, Asantha Cooray, PhD, Department of Physics & Astronomy, School of Physical Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA

The goal of this experiment is to understand the components of force and their relation to motion through the use of Newton's second law by measuring the acceleration of a glider being acted upon by a force. Nearly every aspect of motion in everyday life can be described using Isaac Newton's three laws of motion. They describe how objects in motion will tend to stay in motion (the first law), objects will accelerate when acted upon by a net force (the second law), and every force exerted by an object will have an equal and opposite force exerted back onto that object (the third law). Almost all of high school and undergraduate mechanics is based on these simple concepts.


 Essentials of Physics I

Measurement of Maximum Isometric Force Generated by Permeabilized Skeletal Muscle Fibers

1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Michigan Medical School, 2Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan Medical School, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan Medical School, 4Department of Surgery, Section of Plastic Surgery, University of Michigan Medical School

JoVE 52695


 Bioengineering

Misattribution of Arousal and Cognitive Dissonance

JoVE 10333

Source: Peter Mende-Siedlecki & Jay Van Bavel—New York University

A host of research in psychology suggests that feelings of psychological arousal may be relatively ambiguous, and under certain circumstances, can lead us to make inaccurate conclusions about our own mental states. Much of this work flows from seminal research conducted by Stanley Schacter and and Jerome Singer. If someone experiences arousal and does not have an obvious, appropriate explanation, they may attempt to explain their arousal in terms of other aspects of the situation or social context. For example, in one classic study, participants were told they were receiving a drug called “Suproxin,” in an attempt to test their vision.1 In reality, they received shots of epinephrine, which typically increases feelings of psychological arousal. While some participants were told that the drug would have side effects similar to epinephrine, others were not informed of the side effects, others were misinformed, and others received a placebo with no arousing side effects. Participants then interacted with a confederate, who was either behaving in a euphoric or an angry manner. The authors observed that participants who had no explanation for t


 Essentials of Social Psychology

Needle Thoracostomy

JoVE 10233

Source: Rachel Liu, BAO, MBBCh, Emergency Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

A tension pneumothorax is a life-threatening situation in which excess air is introduced into the pleural space surrounding the lung, either through trauma to the chest cavity or as a spontaneous leak of air from the lung itself. Air trapped within the pleural space causes separation of the lung from the chest wall, disrupting normal breathing mechanisms. Pneumothorax may be small without conversion to tension, but when there is a significant and expanding amount of air trapped in the pleural cavity, the increasing pressure from this abnormal air causes the lung to shrink and collapse, leading to respiratory distress. This pressure also pushes the mediastinum (including the heart and great vessels) away from its central position, causing inability of blood to return to the heart and diminishing the cardiac output. Tension pneumothoraces cause chest pain, extreme shortness of breath, respiratory failure, hypoxia, tachycardia, and hypotension. They need to be relieved emergently when a patient is in extremis. Tension pneumothoraces are definitively managed by procedures that allow removal of trapped air, such as insertion of a chest tube. However, materials for chest tube placement are typically


 Essentials of Emergency Medicine and Critical Care

Preparation of Light-responsive Membranes by a Combined Surface Grafting and Postmodification Process

1Laboratory for Protection and Physiology, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, 2Laboratory of Advanced Fibers, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, 3Division of Neonatology, University Hospital Zurich

JoVE 51680


 Bioengineering

Nanomanipulation of Single RNA Molecules by Optical Tweezers

1Nanoscale Engineering Graduate Program, College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany, State University of New York, 2Nanoscale Science Undergraduate Program, College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany, State University of New York, 3Nanobioscience Constellation, College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany, State University of New York, 4The RNA Institute, University at Albany, State University of New York, 5Department of Biological Sciences, University at Albany, State University of New York

JoVE 51542


 Bioengineering

Tissue Triage and Freezing for Models of Skeletal Muscle Disease

1Division of Pediatric Pathology, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, 2Department of Physiology and Cell Biology, The Ohio State University, 3Department of Human Nutrition, Foods and Exercise, Virginia Tech, 4Division of Biomedical Informatics, Department of Biostatistics, Department of Computer Science, University of Kentucky, 5Division of Genetics and Genomics, The Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 6Cure Congenital Muscular Dystrophy, 7Joshua Frase Foundation, 8Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, 9Department of Physiology, University of Arizona

JoVE 51586


 Biology

Kinematics and Projectile Motion

JoVE 10314

Source: Ketron Mitchell-Wynne, PhD, Asantha Cooray, PhD, Department of Physics & Astronomy, School of Physical Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA

This experiment demonstrates the kinematics of motion in 1 and 2 dimensions. This lab will begin by studying motion in 1 dimension, under constant acceleration, by launching a projectile directly upward and measuring the maximum height reached. This lab will verify that the maximum height reached is consistent with the kinematic equations derived below. Motion in 2 dimensions will be demonstrated by launching the ball at an angle θ. Using the kinematic equations below, one can predict the distance to where the projectile will land based upon the initial speed, total time, and angle of trajectory. This will demonstrate kinematic motion with and with out acceleration in the y- and x-directions, respectively.


 Essentials of Physics I

Combining Single-molecule Manipulation and Imaging for the Study of Protein-DNA Interactions

1LENS - European Laboratory for Non-linear Spectroscopy, University of Florence, 2Chemistry Research Laboratory, University of Oxford, 3Department of Biology, University of Florence, 4Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Florence, 5National Institute of Optics-National Research Council, Italy, 6International Center of Computational Neurophotonics

JoVE 51446


 Biology

Compound Administration I

JoVE 10198

Source: Kay Stewart, RVT, RLATG, CMAR; Valerie A. Schroeder, RVT, RLATG. University of Notre Dame, IN

As many research protocols require that a substance be injected into an animal, the route of delivery and the amount of the substance must be accurately determined. There are several routes of administration available in the mouse and rat. Which route to use is determined by several factors of the substance to be injected: the pH of the solution, the volume required for the desired dosage, and the viscosity of the solution. Severe tissue damage can occur if a substance is administered incorrectly. This video looks at the various restraint methods and technical details for the most commonly used injection routes.


 Essentials of Lab Animal Research

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