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Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors: A family of angiogenic proteins that are closely-related to Vascular endothelial growth factor a. They play an important role in the growth and differentiation of vascular as well as lymphatic endothelial cells.
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Physical Properties Of Minerals II: Polymineralic Analysis

JoVE 10001

Source: Laboratory of Alan Lester - University of Colorado Boulder

The physical properties of minerals include various measurable and discernible attributes, including color, streak, magnetic properties, hardness, crystal growth form, and crystal cleavage. These properties are mineral-specific, and they are fundamentally related to a particular mineral’s chemical make-up and atomic structure. This video examines several physical properties that are useful in field and hand sample mineral identification— color, luster, streak, hardness, magnetism, and reaction with acid. Unlike crystal form and crystal cleavage, these properties are somewhat more closely linked to mineral chemical composition than to atomic structure, but both do play a role. It is important to recognize that rocks are aggregates of mineral grains. Most rocks are polymineralic (multiple kinds of mineral grains) but some are effectively monomineralic (composed of a single mineral). Unlike crystal form and cleavage, which are terms reserved for mineral specimens, geologists might on occasion refer to a rock as having a general sort of color, hardness, magnetism, or reaction with acid. In other words, the physical properties looked at here are potentially appropriate for use with rocks as well as with specific minerals.


 Earth Science

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Glycan Profiling of Plant Cell Wall Polymers using Microarrays

1Australian Centre of Excellence in Plant Cell Walls, School of Botany, University of Melbourne, 2Plant Cell Biology Research Centre, School of Botany, University of Melbourne, 3CSIRO Plant Industry, Black Mountain Laboratories, 4Department of Plant Biology and Biotechnology, University of Copenhagen

JoVE 4238


 Biology

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Phenotyping Mouse Pulmonary Function In Vivo with the Lung Diffusing Capacity

1Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, 2Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, 3Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

JoVE 52216


 Biology

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Personalized Needles for Microinjections in the Rodent Brain

1Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Pharmacology, and National Institute of Neurosciences, University of Ferrara, 2Laboratory for the Technologies for Advanced Therapies (LTTA), University of Ferrara

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 55751


 JoVE In-Press

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Multispectral Real-time Fluorescence Imaging for Intraoperative Detection of the Sentinel Lymph Node in Gynecologic Oncology

1Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, 2Helmholtz Zentrum, Technical University Munich, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Medical Center Groningen

JoVE 2225


 Medicine

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Physiological Correlates of Emotion Recognition

JoVE 10297

Source: Laboratories of Jonas T. Kaplan and Sarah I. Gimbel—University of Southern California

The autonomic nervous system (ANS) controls the activity of the body's internal organs and regulates changes in their activity depending on the current environment. The vagus nerve, which innervates many of the internal organs, is an important part of the system. When our brain senses danger, vagal tone is inhibited, leading to a set of changes in the body designed to make us more prepared to fight or flee; for example, our heart rate increases, our pupils dilate, and we breath more quickly. Conversely, when the vagal system is activated, these physiological responses are inhibited, leading to a calmer state. The vagus nerve, then, acts as a kind of "brake" on our arousal. One interesting consequence of this calmer state is that it tends to promote social interaction-when we are not tensed and afraid of our immediate environment we are instead receptive to interacting with others. Poor functioning of this regulatory mechanism, therefore, may be associated with difficulties in social behavior. One index of autonomic regulation is heart rate variability (HRV). HRV is a measure of how much the gap between one beat and the next varies over time. High HRV means there are continual fluctuations in the


 Neuropsychology

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Lipid Bilayer Vesicle Generation Using Microfluidic Jetting

1Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas at Austin, 4Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, 5Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

JoVE 51510


 Bioengineering

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Biomolecular Detection employing the Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS)

1Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, 3Center for Advanced Genomics Technology, Boston University, 4Department of Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, Boston University School of Medicine, 5Department of Microbiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 6CNR (National Research Council), Istituto di Chimica del Riconoscimento Molecolare

JoVE 2694


 Bioengineering

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Sample Preparation for Analytical Characterization

JoVE 10205

Source: Laboratory of Dr. B. Jill Venton - University of Virginia

Sample preparation is the way in which a sample is treated to prepare for analysis. Careful sample preparation is critical in analytical chemistry to accurately generate either a standard or unknown sample for a chemical measurement. Errors in analytical chemistry methods are categorized as random or systematic. Random errors are errors due to change and are often due to noise in instrument. Systematic errors are due to investigator or instrumental bias, which introduces an offset in the measured value. Errors in sample preparation are systematic errors, which will propagate through analysis, causing uncertainty or inaccuracies through improper calibration curves. Systematic errors can be eliminated through correct sample preparation and proper use of the instrument. Poor sample preparation can also sometimes cause harm to the instrument.


 Analytical Chemistry

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Quantitation of γH2AX Foci in Tissue Samples

1Epigenomic Medicine, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, The Alfred Medical Research and Education Precinct, 2Epigenetics in Human Health and Disease, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, The Alfred Medical Research and Education Precinct, 3Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, 4Department of Allergy and Immunology, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, 5Department of Pediatrics, The University of Melbourne

JoVE 2063


 Biology

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Evaluation of the Spatial Distribution of γH2AX following Ionizing Radiation

1Epigenetics in Human Health and Disease, BakerIDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, The Alfred Medical Research and Education Precinct, 2Epigenomic Medicine, BakerIDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, The Alfred Medical Research and Education Precinct, 3Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne

JoVE 2203


 Biology

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Community DNA Extraction from Bacterial Colonies

JoVE 10218

Source: Laboratories of Dr. Ian Pepper and Dr. Charles Gerba - Arizona University
Demonstrating Author: Luisa Ikner

Traditional methods of analysis for microbial communities within soils have usually involved either cultural assays utilizing dilution and plating methodology on selective and differential media or direct count assays. Direct counts offer information about the total number of bacteria present, but give no information about the number or diversity of populations present within the community. Plate counts allow enumeration of total cultural or selected cultural populations, and hence provide information on the different populations present. However, since less than 1% of soil bacteria are readily culturable, cultural information offers only a piece of the picture. The actual fraction of the community that can be cultured depends on the medium chosen for cultural counts. Any single medium will select for the populations that are best suited to that particular medium. In recent years, the advantages of studying community DNA extracted from soil samples have become apparent. This nonculture-based approach is thought to be more representative of the actual community present than culture-based approaches. In addition to providing information about the types of populations present, this


 Environmental Microbiology

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Ex vivo Expansion of Tumor-reactive T Cells by Means of Bryostatin 1/Ionomycin and the Common Gamma Chain Cytokines Formulation

1Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Virginia Commonwealth University- Massey Cancer Center, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University- Massey Cancer Center, 3Department of Surgery, Virginia Commonwealth University- Massey Cancer Center

JoVE 2381


 Immunology and Infection

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