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Venous Pressure: The blood pressure in the Veins. It is usually measured to assess the filling Pressure to the Heart ventricle.

Invasive Hemodynamic Characterization of the Portal-hypertensive Syndrome in Cirrhotic Rats

1Div. of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Dept. of Internal Medicine III, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria, 2Vienna Hepatic Hemodynamic Laboratory, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria, 3Center of Biomedical Research, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria

JoVE 57261


 Medicine

Percutaneous Hepatic Perfusion (PHP) with Melphalan as a Treatment for Unresectable Metastases Confined to the Liver

1Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, 2Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Centre, 3Department of Anesthesiology, Leiden University Medical Centre, 4Department of Extracorporeal Circulation, Leiden University Medical Centre, 5Department of Medical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Centre, 6Department of Surgery, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute

JoVE 53795


 Medicine

Adult Mouse Venous Hypertension Model: Common Carotid Artery to External Jugular Vein Anastomosis.

1Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care and Center for Cerebrovascular Research, University of California, San Francisco, 2Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, 3Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco

JoVE 50472


 Medicine

Use of Two Intracorporeal Ventricular Assist Devices As a Total Artificial Heart

1Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Duke University, 2Division of Cardiovascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, National Cheng Kung University Hospital and College of Medicine, 3Division of Surgical Sciences, Department of Surgery, Duke University

JoVE 55961


 Medicine

Complete and Partial Aortic Occlusion for the Treatment of Hemorrhagic Shock in Swine

1Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, 2Hays Innovations

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 58284


 JoVE In-Press

Central Venous Catheter Insertion: Internal Jugular

JoVE 10237

Source: James W Bonz, MD, Emergency Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

Central venous access is necessary in a multitude of clinical situations, including vascular access, vasopressor and caustic medication delivery, central venous pressure monitoring, intravascular device delivery (pacing wires, Swann-Ganz catheters), volume resuscitation, total parental nutrition, hemodialysis, and frequent phlebotomy. Safe reliable placement of a central venous catheter (CVC) in the internal jugular (IJ) vein using ultrasound guidance has become the standard of care. It is therefore imperative to understand the anatomy, the relationship between the IJ and the carotid artery, and their appearance on ultrasound. It is also necessary to have the psychomotor skills of vessel cannulation under ultrasound guidance. Seldinger technique is an introduction of a device into the body over a guide wire, which is inserted through a thin-walled needle. In the case of CVC insertion, the device is an intravascular catheter and the target vessel is a central vein. First, the target vessel is cannulated with an 18 gauge thin-walled needle. A guide wire is then passed thought the needle until it is appropriately positioned within the vessel. The needle is removed,


 Emergency Medicine and Critical Care

Isolated Hepatic Perfusion as a Treatment for Liver Metastases of Uveal Melanoma

1Department of Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, 2Department of Thoracic Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, 3Transplant Institute, Institute of Clinical Sciences, 4Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg

JoVE 52490


 Medicine

Central Venous Catheter Insertion: Femoral Vein

JoVE 10240

Source: James W Bonz, MD, Emergency Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

Central venous access is necessary in a multitude of clinical situations, including vascular access, vasopressor and caustic medication delivery, central venous pressure monitoring, volume resuscitation, total parental nutrition, hemodialysis, and frequent phlebotomy. There are three veins in the body that are accessed for central venous cannulation: the internal jugular, the subclavian, and the femoral. Each of these vessels has distinct advantages and disadvantages with unique anatomical considerations. Femoral vein cannulation can be easily performed both under ultrasound guidance and using the surface landmarks; therefore, femoral access is often used when emergent placement of a central venous catheter (CVC) is needed (such as in the case of medical codes and trauma resuscitations). In addition, cannulation of the femoral artery allows one to simultaneously perform other procedures needed for stabilization, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and intubation. Successful placement of a femoral CVC requires working understanding of the target anatomy, access to with procedural ultrasound, and fluidity in the Seldinger technique. Seld


 Emergency Medicine and Critical Care

Ex Situ Normothermic Machine Perfusion of Donor Livers

1Section of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery and Liver Transplantation, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, 2Surgical Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, 3Center of Engineering in Medicine/Surgical Services, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and Shriners Burns Hospital, 4Division of Transplantation, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School

JoVE 52688


 Medicine

Cardiac Exam I: Inspection and Palpation

JoVE 10071

Source: Suneel Dhand, MD, Attending Physician, Internal Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

The cardiac assessment is one of the core examinations performed by almost every physician whenever encountering a patient. Disorders of the cardiac system are among the most common reasons for hospital admission, with conditions ranging from myocardial infarction to congestive heart failure. Learning a complete and thorough cardiac examination is therefore crucial for any practicing physician. If there is pathology in the heart or circulatory system, the consequences can also be manifested in other bodily areas, including the lungs, abdomen, and legs. Many physicians instinctively reach straight for their stethoscopes when performing cardiac exams. However, a large amount of information is gained before auscultation by going through the correct sequence of examination, starting with inspection and palpation.


 Physical Examinations I

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