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Ventricular Fibrillation: A potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia that is characterized by uncoordinated extremely rapid firing of electrical impulses (400-600/min) in Heart ventricles. Such asynchronous ventricular quivering or fibrillation prevents any effective cardiac output and results in unconsciousness (Syncope). It is one of the major electrocardiographic patterns seen with Cardiac arrest.

Primary Outcome Assessment in a Pig Model of Acute Myocardial Infarction

1Department of Experimental Cardiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, 2Department of Cardiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3Department of Clinical Chemistry and Hematology, University Medical Center Utrecht, 4Interuniversity Cardiology Institutes of the Netherlands (ICIN)

JoVE 54021


 Medicine

Benefits of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in an Asynchronous Heart Failure Model Induced by Left Bundle Branch Ablation and Rapid Pacing

1Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 2Department of Echocardiography, Shanghai Institute of Medical imaging, Shanghai Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 3Department of Cardiac surgery, Shanghai Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University

JoVE 56439


 Biology

Basic Life Support: Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Defibrillation

JoVE 10199

Source: Julianna Jung, MD, FACEP, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Maryland, USA

High-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is the single most important determinant of intact survival in cardiac arrest, and it is critical that all healthcare workers are able to perform this lifesaving technique effectively. Despite the conceptual simplicity of CPR, the reality is that many providers perform it incorrectly, resulting in suboptimal survival outcomes for their patients. This video looks at the essential elements of high-quality CPR, discusses the physiologic basis for each step, and describes how to optimize them in order to enhance survival outcomes. Appropriate prioritization of interventions in cardiac arrest and methods for optimizing resuscitation performance are covered as well.


 Emergency Medicine and Critical Care

An Injectable and Drug-loaded Supramolecular Hydrogel for Local Catheter Injection into the Pig Heart

1Institute for Complex Molecular Systems, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Laboratory of Chemical Biology, Eindhoven University of Technology, 2Department of Cardiology, Division Heart and Lungs, Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands (ICIN), University Medical Center Utrecht

JoVE 52450


 Bioengineering

Basic Life Support Part II: Airway/Breathing and Continued Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

JoVE 10232

Source: Julianna Jung, MD, FACEP, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Maryland, USA

High-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation are the most important interventions for patients with cardiac arrest, and should be the first steps that rescuers perform. This is reflected in the American Heart Association's new "CAB" mnemonic. While rescuers were once taught the "ABCs" of cardiac arrest, they now learn "CAB" - circulation first, followed by airway and breathing. Only once CPR is underway (and defibrillation has been performed, if a defibrillator is available) do we consider providing respiratory support. This video will describe the correct technique for providing respiratory support to a patient in cardiac arrest, and how to continue basic life support over the period of time until help arrives. This video assumes that all the steps described in "Basic Life Support Part I: Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Defibrillation" have already been completed. This video does NOT depict the initial steps taken when arriving at the scene of a cardiac arrest.


 Emergency Medicine and Critical Care

Electrical Safety Precautions and Basic Equipment

JoVE 10114

Source: Ali Bazzi, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT.

Electric machines and power electronics experiments involve electrical currents, voltages, power, and energy quantities that should be handled with extreme diligence and care. These may include three-phase AC voltage (208 V, 230 V, or 480 V), up to 250 V DC voltages, and currents that can reach 10 A. Electrocution occurs when an electrical path is established through the body with very low currents that can damage vital organs, such as a person’s heart, and may cause immediate death. All experiments must be performed in the presence of personnel trained to handle electricity at these voltage and current levels. In case of emergency, evacuate the lab through any of the exits and dial 911.


 Electrical Engineering

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