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Water Quality: A rating of a body of water based on measurable physical, chemical, and biological characteristics.

Swimming Induced Paralysis to Assess Dopamine Signaling in Caenorhabditis Elegans

1Harriet Wilkes Honors College, Florida Atlantic University, John D MacArthur Campus, 2Integrative Biology and Neuroscience program, College of Science, Florida Atlantic University, 3Brain Institute, Florida Atlantic University, 4Department of Biomedical Science, Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, Florida Atlantic University

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 59243


 JoVE In-Press

Sampling, Sorting, and Characterizing Microplastics in Aquatic Environments with High Suspended Sediment Loads and Large Floating Debris

1Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, 2Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Saint Louis University, 3Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Louisiana State University, 4Department of Biology, University of Central Florida

JoVE 57969


 Environment

Protocol for Acute and Chronic Ecotoxicity Testing of the Turquoise Killifish Nothobranchius furzeri

1Animal Ecology, Global Change and Sustainable Development, University of Leuven, 2Systemic Physiological and Ecotoxicological Research, University of Antwerp, 3Water Research Group, Unit for Environmental Sciences and Management, North-West University, 4Centre for Environmental Management, University of the Free State

JoVE 57308


 Environment

Regular Care and Maintenance of a Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Laboratory: An Introduction

1Centre of Excellence for Alzheimer's Disease Research and Care, School of Medical sciences, Edith Cowan University, 2Centre for Clinical Research in Neuropsychiatry, Graylands Hospital, University of Western Australia, 3McCusker Alzheimer's Research foundation, 4School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, 5Department of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Adelaide, 6School of Biomedical Sciences, Curtin University of Technology, 7School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, University of Western Australia

JoVE 4196


 Biology

The Portable Chemical Sterilizer (PCS), D-FENS, and D-FEND ALL: Novel Chlorine Dioxide Decontamination Technologies for the Military

1United States Army-Natick Soldier RD&E Center, Warfighter Directorate, 2Department of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, University of Connecticut Health Center, 3Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 4Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute

JoVE 4354


 Bioengineering

Multi-analyte Biochip (MAB) Based on All-solid-state Ion-selective Electrodes (ASSISE) for Physiological Research

1Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Birck-Bindley Physiological Sensing Facility, Purdue University, 2NASA Ames Research Center, 3Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University Hazleton, 4Cooley LLP, 5NASA Life and Physical Sciences, Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters

JoVE 50020


 Bioengineering

Zebrafish Maintenance and Husbandry

JoVE 5152

The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a powerful vertebrate model system for studying development, modeling disease, and screening for novel therapeutics. Due to their small size, large numbers of zebrafish can be housed in the laboratory at low cost. Although zebrafish are relatively easy to maintain, special consideration must be given to both diet and water quality to in order to optimize fish health and reproductive success. This video will provide an overview of zebrafish husbandry and maintenance in the lab. After a brief review of the natural zebrafish habitat, techniques essential to recreating this environment in the lab will be discussed, including key elements of fish facility water recirculation systems and the preparation of brine shrimp as part of the zebrafish diet. Additionally, the presentation will include information on how specific zebrafish strains are tracked in a laboratory setting, with specific reference to the collection of tail fin samples for DNA extraction and genotyping. Finally, experimental modifications of the zebrafish environment will be discussed as a means to further our understanding of these fish, and in turn, ourselves.


 Biology II

Use of Chironomidae (Diptera) Surface-Floating Pupal Exuviae as a Rapid Bioassessment Protocol for Water Bodies

1Department of Entomology, University of Minnesota, 2Biology, Chemistry & Physics, and Mathematics Department, Northern State University, 3Environmental Analysis and Outcomes Division, Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, 4RMB Environmental Laboratories, Inc.

JoVE 52558


 Environment

Water Quality Analysis via Indicator Organisms

JoVE 10025

Source: Laboratories of Dr. Ian Pepper and Dr. Charles Gerba - Arizona University
Demonstrating Author: Luisa Ikner

Water quality analysis monitors anthropogenic influences such as pollutants, nutrients, pathogens, and any other constituent that can impact the water’s integrity as a resource. Fecal contamination contributes microbial pathogens that threaten plant, animal, and human health with disease or illness. Increasing water demands and strict quality standards require that water being supplied for human or environmental resources be monitored for low pathogen levels. However, monitoring each pathogen associated with fecal pollution is not feasible, as laboratory techniques involve extensive labor, time, and costs. Therefore, detection for indicator organisms provides a simple, rapid, and cost effective technique to monitor pathogens associated with unsanitary conditions.


 Environmental Microbiology

Dissolved Oxygen in Surface Water

JoVE 10016

Source: Laboratories of Margaret Workman and Kimberly Frye - Depaul University

Dissolved oxygen (DO) measurements calculate the amount of gaseous oxygen dissolved in surface water, which is important to all oxygen-breathing life in river ecosystems, including fish species preferred for human consumption (e.g. bluegill and bass), as well as decomposer species critical to the recycling of biogeochemical materials in the system. The oxygen dissolved in lakes, rivers, and oceans is crucial for the organisms and creatures living in it. As the amount of dissolved oxygen drops below normal levels in water bodies, the water quality is harmed and creatures begin to die. In a process called eutrophication, a body of water can become hypoxic and will no longer be able to support living organisms, essentially becoming a “dead zone.” Eutrophication occurs when excess nutrients cause algae populations to grow rapidly in an algal bloom. The algal bloom forms dense mats at the surface of the water blocking out two essential inputs of oxygen for water: gas exchange from the atmosphere and photosynthesis in the water due to the lack of light below the mats. As dissolved oxygen levels decline below the surface, oxygen-breathing organisms die-off in large amounts, creati


 Environmental Science

Turbidity and Total Solids in Surface Water

JoVE 10015

Source: Laboratories of Margaret Workman and Kimberly Frye - Depaul University

Turbidity and total solids are related measurements addressing clarity of surface waters. Turbidity is an indirect measure of water clarity that determines the amount of light that can pass through the water. Total solids is a direct measurement of solid particles suspended in water determined by weight. High levels of turbidity and total solids are caused by soil erosion, waste discharge, runoff, or changes in ecological communities including algal growth or abundance of benthic organisms that can disrupt sediments up into the water. Higher levels of turbidity and suspended solids can lower water quality by absorbing heat causing an increase in water temperature and a decrease in oxygen levels (warm water holds less oxygen). These conditions can also cause a decrease in photosynthesis as less sunlight penetrates the water, making the water unable to support some aquatic life. Suspended solids can also clog gills, smother eggs, reduce growth rates, and disrupt microhabitats of many aquatic organisms. One method of measuring turbidity includes using a Secchi disk. A Secchi disk is a metal disk with alternate black and white quarters (Figure 1). It is attached to a rope that


 Environmental Science

Introduction to Titration

JoVE 5699

Source: Laboratory of Dr. Yee Nee Tan — Agency for Science, Technology, and Research

Titration is a common technique used to quantitatively determine the unknown concentration of an identified analyte.1-4 It is also called volumetric analysis, as the measurement of volumes is critical in titration. There are many types of titrations based on the types of reactions they exploit. The most common types are acid-base titrations and redox titrations.5-11 In a typical titration process, a standard solution of titrant in a burette is gradually applied to react with an analyte with an unknown concentration in an Erlenmeyer flask. For acid-base titration, a pH indicator is usually added in the analyte solution to indicate the endpoint of titration.12 Instead of adding pH indicators, pH can also be monitored using a pH meter during a titration process and the endpoint is determined graphically from a pH titration curve. The volume of titrant recorded at the endpoint can be used to calculate the concentration of the analyte based on the reaction stoichiometry. For the acid-base titration presented in this video, the titrant is a standardized sodium hydroxide solution and the analyte is domestic vinegar. Vinegar is an acidic liquid that


 General Chemistry

Nutrients in Aquatic Ecosystems

JoVE 10023

Source: Laboratories of Margaret Workman and Kimberly Frye - Depaul University

Nitrogen and phosphorus are essential plant nutrients found in aquatic ecosystems and both are monitored as a part of water quality testing because in excess amounts they can cause significant water quality problems. 

Nitrogen in water is measured as the common form nitrate (NO3-) that is dissolved in water and readily absorbed by photosynthesizers such as algae. The common form of phosphorus measured is phosphate (PO43-), which is strongly attracted to sediment particles as well as dissolved in water. In excess amounts, both nutrients can cause an increase in aquatic plant growth (algal bloom, Figure 1) that can disrupt the light, temperature, and oxygen levels in the water below and lead to eutrophication and hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen in water) forming a “dead zone” of no biological activity. Sources of nitrates and phosphorus include wastewater treatment plants, runoff from fertilized lawns and agricultural lands, faulty septic systems, animal manure runoff, and industrial waste discharge. Figu


 Environmental Science

Gram Staining of Bacteria from Environmental Sources

JoVE 10092

Source: Laboratories of Dr. Ian Pepper and Dr. Charles Gerba - Arizona University
Demonstrating Author: Luisa Ikner

The spectrum of research in environmental microbiology is broad in scope and application potential. Whether the work is bench-scale with known bacterial isolates, or in the field collecting soil or water samples containing unknown bacterial isolates, the ability to quickly and visually discern culturable populations of interest remains of great import to environmental microbiologists even today with the abundance of molecular techniques available for use. This video will demonstrate one such technique, known as Gram staining.


 Environmental Microbiology

Algae Enumeration via Culturable Methodology

JoVE 10154

Source: Laboratories of Dr. Ian Pepper and Dr. Charles Gerba - Arizona University
Demonstrating Author: Bradley Schmitz

Algae are a highly heterogeneous group of microorganisms that have one common trait, namely the possession of photosynthetic pigments. In the environment, algae can cause problems for swimming pool owners by growing in the water. Algae can also cause problems in surface waters, such as lakes and reservoirs, due to algal blooms that release toxins. More recently, algae are being evaluated as novel sources of energy via algal biofuels. Blue-green algae are actually bacteria classified as cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria not only photosynthesize, but also have the ability to fix nitrogen gas from the atmosphere. Other algae are eukaryotic, ranging from single-celled organisms to complex multicellular organisms, like seaweeds. These include the green algae, the euglenoids, the dinoflagellates, the golden brown algae, diatoms, the brown algae, and the red algae. In soils, algal populations are frequently 106 per gram. These numbers are lower than corresponding numbers for bacteria, actinomycetes, and fungi, mostly because the sunlight required for photosynthesis cannot penetrate far beneath the soil surface. Because algae are phototrophic, obtaining energy from photosyn


 Environmental Microbiology

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