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Yolk Sac: The first of four extra-embryonic membranes to form during Embryogenesis. In Reptiles and Birds, it arises from endoderm and mesoderm to incorporate the Egg yolk into the Digestive tract for nourishing the embryo. In placental Mammals, its nutritional function is vestigial; however, it is the source of Intestinal mucosa; Blood cells; and Germ cells. It is sometimes called the vitelline sac, which should not be confused with the Vitelline membrane of the egg.

The Production of Pluripotent Stem Cells from Mouse Amniotic Fluid Cells Using a Transposon System

1Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Laboratory, Fondazione Istituto di Ricerca Pediatrica Citta della Speranza, 2Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, 3Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine Section, Developmental Biology and Cancer Programme, UCL Institute of Child Health and Great Ormond Street Hospital

JoVE 54598


 Developmental Biology

Analysis of Zebrafish Larvae Skeletal Muscle Integrity with Evans Blue Dye

1Program in Genetics & Genome Biology, The Hospital for Sick Children, 2Department of Molecular Genetics, The University of Toronto, 3Program in Genomics of Differentiation, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 4Departments of Pediatrics and Neurology, University of Michigan

JoVE 53183


 Developmental Biology

Characterization of Thymic Settling Progenitors in the Mouse Embryo Using In Vivo and In Vitro Assays

1Research Center Growth and Signaling, INSERM U845, Institut Cochin, 2Unit for Biology of Lymphocyte Populations, Immunology Department, Institut Pasteur and CIMI, Unity of Treg Biology and Therapy, University of Pierre & Marie Curie, 3Unit for Lymphopoiesis, Immunology Department, INSERM U668, University Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Cellule Pasteur, Institut Pasteur

JoVE 52795


 Developmental Biology

Gastrulation

JoVE 10909

Gastrulation establishes the three primary tissues of an embryo: the ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. This developmental process relies on a series of intricate cellular movements, which in humans transforms a flat, “bilaminar disc” composed of two cell sheets into a three-tiered structure. In the resulting embryo, the endoderm serves as the bottom layer, and stacked directly…


 Core: Reproduction and Development

Glial Cells

JoVE 10843

Overview

Glial cells are one of the two main types of cells in the nervous system. Glia cells comprise astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia, and ependymal cells in the central nervous system, and satellite and Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system. These cells do not communicate via electrical signals like neurons do, but they contribute to virtually every other aspect …


 Core: Nervous System

Explant Culture of Neural Tissue

JoVE 5209

The intricate structure of the vertebrate nervous system arises from a complex series of events involving cell differentiation, cell migration, and changes in cell morphology. Studying these processes is essential to our understanding of nervous system function as well as our ability to diagnose and treat disorders that result from abnormal development. However, neural…


 Neuroscience

Development of the Chick

JoVE 5155

The chicken embryo (Gallus gallus domesticus) provides an economical and accessible model for developmental biology research. Chicks develop rapidly and are amenable to genetic and physiological manipulations, allowing researchers to investigate developmental pathways down to the cell and molecular levels.


This video review of chick development begins by describing the…


 Biology II

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