Methods Collections

Current Methods in Vascular Network Bioengineering: from Stem Cells, to Organoid Systems and Tissue Engineering

COVID-19 response: Video production in affected areas is postponed, publishing text articles first

JoVE will publish text articles after the peer review, which on average takes two months after the manuscript submission. We will film and add corresponding videos to our website when laboratories and facilities in affected areas reopen.

Just Started
Methods Collection Image
Methods Collections
Current Methods in Vascular Network Bioengineering: from Stem Cells, to Organoid Systems and Tissue Engineering

Guest Editors
Juan Melero-Martin

Boston Children’s Hospital | Harvard Medical School

Dr. Melero-Martin graduated in Chemical Engineering from the University of Seville, Spain. After working three years in...

Kai Wang

Boston Children’s Hospital | Harvard Medical School

Dr. Wang graduated in Biomedical Engineering from Southeast University, China, in 2010. In 2016, he earned a Ph.D. in...

Collection Overview

The prospect of generating organ and tissue replacements via tissue engineering holds great promise in regenerative medicine. However, integrating a functional microvasculature into engineered tissues to facilitate sufficient oxygenation, nutrient distribution, and elimination of waste products remains a significant challenge. In recent years, there has been extraordinary progress in the ability to generate functional human vascular networks from stem cells and the use of innovative bioengineering approaches. Notably, the use of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (h-iPSCs) has moved from a far-fetched concept to the forefront of regenerative medicine research, and advances in h-iPSCs biology have affected many disciplines, including vascular biology. Indeed, mounting evidence indicates the tantalizing possibility of deriving an unlimited number of endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from h-iPSCs. The prospect of having an unlimited source of autologous vascular cells is tremendously exciting, and these advances should influence future vascularization approaches.

In this collection, we present a combination of novel techniques and standard protocols to investigate the formation of vascular networks in the context of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The focus is on 1) methods to derive competent vascular cells from the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells; 2) vascular heterogeneity and protocols to generate organ- and tissue-specific vasculatures; 3) different bioengineering approaches to form functional vascular networks, including three-dimensional (3D) printing and microphysiological systems; and 4) methods to vascularize 3D engineered tissues as well as organoids.

Articles