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Cell Death: The termination of the cell's ability to carry out vital functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, responsiveness, and adaptability.

Assay for Cell Death: Chromium Release Assay of Cytotoxic Ability

JoVE 10505

Source: Frances V. Sjaastad1,2, Whitney Swanson2,3, and Thomas S. Griffith1,2,3,4
1 Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology Graduate Program, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455
2 Center for Immunology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455
3 Department of Urology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455
4 Masonic…

 Immunology

An Introduction to Cell Death

JoVE 5649

Necrosis, apoptosis, and autophagic cell death are all manners in which cells can die, and these mechanisms can be induced by different stimuli, such as cell injury, low nutrient levels, or signaling proteins. Whereas necrosis is considered to be an “accidental” or unexpected form of cell death, evidence exists that apoptosis and autophagy are both programmed…

 Cell Biology

Cell Division- Concept

JoVE 10571

Cell division is fundamental to all living organisms and required for growth and development. As an essential means of reproduction for all living things, cell division allows organisms to transfer their genetic material to their offspring. For a unicellular organism, cellular division generates a completely new organism. For multicellular organisms, cellular division produces new cells for…

 Lab Bio

What is the Cell Cycle?

JoVE 10757

The cell cycle refers to the sequence of events occurring throughout a typical cell’s life. In eukaryotic cells, the somatic cell cycle has two stages: interphase and the mitotic phase. During interphase, the cell grows, performs its basic metabolic functions, copies its DNA, and prepares for mitotic cell division. Then, during mitosis and cytokinesis, the cell divides its nuclear and cytoplasmic materials, respectively. This generates two daughter cells that are identical to the original parent cell. The cell cycle is essential for the growth of the organism, replacement of damaged cells, and regeneration of aged cells. Cancer is the result of uncontrolled cell division sparked by a gene mutation. There are three major checkpoints in the eukaryotic cell cycle. At each checkpoint, the progression to the next cell cycle stage can be halted until conditions are more favorable. The G1 checkpoint is the first of these, where a cell’s size, energy, nutrients, DNA quality, and other external factors are evaluated. If the cell is deemed inadequate, it does not continue to the S phase of interphase. The G2 checkpoint is the second checkpoint. Here, the cell ensures that all of the DNA has been replicated and is not damaged before entering mitosis. If any DNA damage is detected that cannot be repaired, the cell may undergo apoptosis, or

 Core: Biology

Negative Regulator Molecules

JoVE 10764

Positive regulators allow a cell to advance through cell cycle checkpoints. Negative regulators have an equally important role as they terminate a cell’s progression through the cell cycle—or pause it—until the cell meets specific criteria.

Three of the best-understood negative regulators are p53, p21, and retinoblastoma protein (Rb). The regulatory roles of each of these proteins were discovered after faulty copies were found in cells with uncontrolled replication (i.e., cancer). These proteins exert most of their regulatory effects at the G1 checkpoint early in the cell cycle. P53 strongly influences a cell’s commitment to divide. It responds to DNA damage by discontinuing the cell cycle and summoning enzymes to repair the damage. If the DNA damage is irreparable, p53 can prevent the cell from proceeding through the cell cycle by inducing apoptosis, or cell death. An increase in p53 triggers the production of p21. P21 prevents the cell from transitioning from the G1 to the S phase of the cell cycle by binding to CDK/cyclin complexes, inhibiting their positive regulatory actions. Rb negatively regulates the cell cycle by acting on different positive regulators, mainly in response to cell size. Active (dephosphorylated) Rb binds to transcription factors, preventing them from initiating gene tran

 Core: Biology

An Introduction to Cell Division

JoVE 5640

Cell division is the process by which a parent cell divides and gives rise to two or more daughter cells. It is a means of reproduction for single-cell organisms. In multicellular organisms, cell division contributes to growth, development, repair, and the generation of reproductive cells (sperms and eggs). Cell division is a tightly regulated process, and aberrant cell…

 Cell Biology

What are Viruses?

JoVE 10821

A virus is a microscopic infectious particle that consists of an RNA or DNA genome enclosed in a protein shell. It is not able to reproduce on its own: it can only make more viruses by entering a cell and using its cellular machinery. When a virus infects a host cell, it removes its protein coat and directs the host’s machinery to transcribe and translate its genetic material. The hijacked cell assembles the replicated components into thousands of viral progeny, which can rupture and kill the host cell. The new viruses then go on to infect more host cells. Viruses can infect different types of cells: bacteria, plants, and animals. Viruses that target bacteria, called bacteriophages (or phages), are very abundant. Current research focuses on phage therapy to treat multidrug-resistant bacterial infections in humans. Viruses that infect cultivated plants are also highly studied since epidemics lead to huge crop and economic losses. Viruses were first discovered in the 19th century when an economically-important crop, the tobacco plant, was plagued by a mysterious disease—later identified as Tobacco mosaic virus. Animal viruses are of great importance both in veterinary research and in medical research. Moreover, viruses underlie many human diseases, ranging from the common cold, chickenpox, and herpes, to more dangerous infection

 Core: Biology

Yeast Signaling

JoVE 10714

Yeasts are single-celled organisms, but unlike bacteria, they are eukaryotes—cells that have a nucleus. Cell signaling in yeast is similar to signaling in other eukaryotic cells. A ligand, such as a protein or a small molecule outside the yeast cell, attaches to a receptor on the cell surface. The binding stimulates second-messenger kinases (enzymes that phosphorylate specific substrates) to activate or inactivate transcription factors that regulate gene expression. Many of the yeast intracellular signaling cascades have similar counterparts in Homo sapiens, making yeast a convenient model for studying intracellular signaling in humans. Yeasts are members of the fungus kingdom. They use signaling for various functions, especially for reproduction. Yeasts can undergo “sexual” reproduction using mating pheromones, which are peptides—short chains of amino acids. Yeast colonies consist of both diploid and haploid cells. Both types of cells can undergo mitosis, but only diploid cells can undergo meiosis. When diploid cells undergo meiosis, the four resulting haploid cells, called spores, are not identical. In fact, the division of one diploid cell into four spores creates two “sexes” of yeast cells, each two cells of the type MAT-a and MAT-alpha. MAT-a cells secrete mating

 Core: Biology

Live Cell Imaging of Mitosis

JoVE 5642

Mitosis is a form of cell division in which a cell’s genetic material is divided equally between two daughter cells. Mitosis can be broken down into six phases, during each of which the cell’s components, such as its chromosomes, show visually distinct characteristics. Advances in fluorescence live cell imaging have allowed scientists to study this process in…

 Cell Biology
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