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Collagen: A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of Skin; Connective tissue; and the organic substance of bones (Bone and bones) and teeth (Tooth).

Collagen Hydrogels

JoVE 5786

Collagen is another widely used biomaterial that has found popularity in commercial applications, such as photography. Collagen has more recently been used in tissue engineering applications, by creating hydrogels that provide structure to engineered tissue.


This video introduces collagen as a biomaterial, demonstrates how it is…

 Bioengineering

Engineering 3D Cellularized Collagen Gels for Vascular Tissue Regeneration

1Laboratory for Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Department Min-Met-Materials Eng & CHU de Québec Research Center, Canada Research Chair I for the Innovation in Surgery, Laval University, 2NSERC CREATE Program for Regenerative Medicine (NCPRM), Laval University, 3Department Electronics, Information and Bioengineering, Politecnico di Milano, 4Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, 5National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council (Canada), 6Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, University of Western Ontario

JoVE 52812

 Bioengineering

Assessing Collagen and Elastin Pressure-dependent Microarchitectures in Live, Human Resistance Arteries by Label-free Fluorescence Microscopy

1Department of Cardiovascular and Renal Research, Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, 2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, 3Department of Cardiac, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Odense University Hospital

JoVE 57451

 Bioengineering

Generation of 3-D Collagen-based Hydrogels to Analyze Axonal Growth and Behavior During Nervous System Development

1Molecular and Cellular Neurobiotechnology, Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST), Parc Científic de Barcelona, 2Department of Cell Biology, Physiology, and Immunology, Universitat de Barcelona, 3Center for Networked Biomedical Research on Neurodegenerative Diseases (CIBERNED), 4Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona

JoVE 59481

 Neuroscience

Recombinant Collagen I Peptide Microcarriers for Cell Expansion and Their Potential Use As Cell Delivery System in a Bioreactor Model

1Department Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, University Hospital Wuerzburg, 2Translational Center Regenerative Therapies (TLC-RT), Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC, 3Fujifilm Manufacturing Europe B.V.

JoVE 57363

 Bioengineering

The Extracellular Matrix

JoVE 10695

In order to maintain tissue organization, many animal cells are surrounded by structural molecules that make up the extracellular matrix (ECM). Together, the molecules in the ECM maintain the structural integrity of tissue as well as the remarkable specific properties of certain tissues.

The extracellular matrix (ECM) is commonly composed of ground substance, a gel-like fluid, fibrous components, and many structurally and functionally diverse molecules. These molecules include polysaccharides called glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). GAGs occupy most of the extracellular space and often take up a large volume relative to their mass. This results in a matrix that can withstand tremendous forces of compression. Most GAGs are linked to proteins—creating proteoglycans. These molecules retain sodium ions based on their positive charge and therefore attract water, which keeps the ECM hydrated. The ECM also contains rigid fibers such as collagens—the primary protein component of the ECM. Collagens are the most abundant proteins in animals, making up 25% of protein by mass. A large diversity of collagens with structural similarities provide tensile strength to many tissues. Notably, tissue like skin, blood vessels, and lungs need to be both strong and stretchy to perform their physiological role. A protein called elastin gives p

 Core: Biology

SEM Imaging of Biological Samples

JoVE 10492

Source: Peiman Shahbeigi-Roodposhti and Sina Shahbazmohamadi, Biomedical Engineering Department, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut


A scanning electron microscope (SEM) is an instrument that uses an electron beam to nondestructively image and characterize conductive materials in a vacuum. As an analogy, an…

 Biomedical Engineering

Quantitative Strain Mapping of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

JoVE 10480

Source: Hannah L. Cebull1, Arvin H. Soepriatna1, John J. Boyle2 and Craig J. Goergen1


1Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana


2Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science, Washington University in St. Louis, St Louis, Missouri


 Biomedical Engineering
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