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Creatine: An amino acid that occurs in vertebrate tissues and in urine. In muscle tissue, creatine generally occurs as phosphocreatine. Creatine is excreted as Creatinine in the urine.

Classification of Skeletal Muscle Fibers

JoVE 10868

Skeletal muscles continuously produce ATP to provide the energy that enables muscle contractions. Skeletal muscle fibers can be categorized as type I, type IIA, or type IIB based on differences in their contraction speed and how they produce ATP, as well as physical differences related to these factors. Most human muscles contain all three muscle fiber types, albeit in varying proportions. Type I, or slow oxidative, muscle fibers appear red due to large numbers of capillaries and high levels of myoglobin, an oxygen-storing protein. Type I muscle fibers contain more mitochondria, which produce ATP through oxidative phosphorylation, than type II fibers. Slow oxidative muscle fibers use aerobic respiration, involving oxygen and glucose, to produce ATP. In addition to contracting more slowly than type II fibers, type I fibers receive nerve signals more slowly, contract for longer periods, and are more resistant to fatigue. Type I fibers primarily store energy as fatty substances called triglycerides. Type II, or fast, muscle fibers often appear white. Relative to type I fibers, type II fibers receive nerve signals and contract more quickly, but contract for shorter periods and fatigue more quickly. Type II muscle fibers primarily store energy as ATP and creatine phosphate. Type IIA, or fast oxidative, muscle fibers primarily u

 Core: Biology

Measurement of Maximum Isometric Force Generated by Permeabilized Skeletal Muscle Fibers

1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Michigan Medical School, 2Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan Medical School, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan Medical School, 4Department of Surgery, Section of Plastic Surgery, University of Michigan Medical School

JoVE 52695

 Bioengineering

The Use of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy as a Tool for the Measurement of Bi-hemispheric Transcranial Electric Stimulation Effects on Primary Motor Cortex Metabolism

1Department of Psychology, University of Montréal, 2Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, 3Center for Magnetic Resonance Research and Department of Radiology, University of Minnesota

JoVE 51631

 Neuroscience
123458
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