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Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.

Anatomy of the Heart

JoVE 10886

The human heart is made up of three layers of tissue that are surrounded by the pericardium, a membrane that protects and confines the heart. The outermost layer, closest to the pericardium, is the epicardium. The pericardial cavity separates the pericardium from the epicardium. Beneath the epicardium is the myocardium, the middle layer, and the endocardium, the innermost layer. There are four chambers of the heart: the right atrium, the right ventricle, the left atrium, and the left ventricle. These compartments have two types of valves—atrioventricular and semilunar—that prevent blood from flowing in the wrong direction. The right atrium receives blood from the coronary sinus and the superior and inferior vena cavae. This blood goes into the right ventricle via the right atrioventricular (or tricuspid) valve, a flap of connective tissue that prevents the backflow of blood into the atrium. Then, the blood leaves the heart, traveling through the pulmonary semilunar valve into the pulmonary artery. Blood is then carried back into the left atrium of the heart by the pulmonary veins. Between the left atrium and the left ventricle, the blood is again passed through an atrioventricular valve that prevents backflow into the atrium. This atrioventricular valve is called the bicuspid (or mitral) valve. The blood passes through the left ventricle into the aorta

 Core: Biology

Anatomy of the Circulatory System

JoVE 10885

The human circulatory system consists of blood, blood vessels that carry blood away from the heart, around the body, and back to the heart, and the heart itself, which acts as a central pump. The systemic circuit supplies blood to the whole body, the coronary circuit supplies blood to the heart, and the pulmonary circuit supplies blood flow between the heart and lungs.

Blood travels from the right atrium to the right ventricle of the heart through the tricuspid valve, then from the right ventricle to the pulmonary artery through the pulmonary valve. Pulmonary veins then carry the blood to the left atrium of the heart, from which it is carried to the left ventricle through the mitral valve. Finally, the left ventricle pumps blood to the aorta (the largest artery in the body) through the aortic valve. Arteries, which carry blood away from the heart, split and get progressively smaller, becoming arterioles and eventually a series of capillaries, the sites of gas exchange. Capillaries converge to become larger venules, and eventually merge into veins, which bring blood back to the heart. Humans have a double circulatory system, in which blood travels through the heart twice via the pulmonary and systemic circuits. First, the heart receives deoxygenated blood in its right side and then pumps it to the nearby pulmonary circuit, the capillaries that ar

 Core: Biology

Cardiac Exam III: Abnormal Heart Sounds

JoVE 10135

Source: Suneel Dhand, MD, Attending Physician, Internal Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center


Having a fundamental understanding of normal heart sounds is the first step toward distinguishing the normal from the abnormal. Murmurs are sounds that represent turbulent and abnormal blood flow across a heart valve. They are caused…

 Physical Examinations I

Physiology of the Circulatory System- Concept

JoVE 10625

Homeostasis

Conditions in the external environment of an organism can change rapidly and drastically. To survive, organisms must maintain a fairly constant internal environment, which involves continuous regulation of temperature, pH, and other factors. This balanced state is known as homeostasis, which describes the processes by which organisms maintain their optimal internal…

 Lab Bio

Normothermic Ex Situ Heart Perfusion in Working Mode: Assessment of Cardiac Function and Metabolism

1Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta, 2Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta, 4Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Alberta, 5Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Alberta, 6Canadian National Transplant Research Program, 7Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta

JoVE 58430

 Medicine

Cardiac Exam II: Auscultation

JoVE 10124

Source: Suneel Dhand, MD, Attending Physician, Internal Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center


Proficiency in the use of a stethoscope to listen to heart sounds and the ability to differentiate between normal and abnormal heart sounds are essential skills for any physician. Correct placement of the stethoscope on the chest…

 Physical Examinations I

Physiological Correlates of Emotion Recognition

JoVE 10297

Source: Laboratories of Jonas T. Kaplan and Sarah I. Gimbel—University of Southern California


The autonomic nervous system (ANS) controls the activity of the body's internal organs and regulates changes in their activity depending on the current environment. The vagus nerve, which innervates many of the internal organs, is an…

 Neuropsychology
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