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Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial Blood pressure. Based on multiple readings (Blood pressure determination), hypertension is currently defined as when Systolic pressure is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when Diastolic pressure is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.

Intracellular Staining and Flow Cytometry to Identify Lymphocyte Subsets within Murine Aorta, Kidney and Lymph Nodes in a Model of Hypertension

1Department of Medicine, Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 2Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University, 3Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mansoura University

JoVE 55266

 Immunology and Infection

Shunt Surgery, Right Heart Catheterization, and Vascular Morphometry in a Rat Model for Flow-induced Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

1Center for Congenital Heart Diseases, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Beatrix Children's Hospital, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, 2Research and Development Facility, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen

JoVE 55065

 Medicine

Physiology of the Circulatory System- Concept

JoVE 10625

Homeostasis

Conditions in the external environment of an organism can change rapidly and drastically. To survive, organisms must maintain a fairly constant internal environment, which involves continuous regulation of temperature, pH, and other factors. This balanced state is known as homeostasis, which describes the processes by which organisms maintain their optimal internal…

 Lab Bio

Hormonal Regulation

JoVE 10893

The renin-aldosterone system is an endocrine system which guides the renal absorption of water and electrolytes, thus managing blood pressure and osmoregulation. Activation of the system begins in the kidneys with a small cluster of cells adjacent to the afferent and efferent blood vessels of the renal corpuscle. As the nephrons are filtering blood, juxtaglomerular cells monitor blood pressure. If they detect a decrease in pressure, they release the hormone renin into the bloodstream. Circulating renin interacts with angiotensinogen, a precursor protein synthesized by the liver, to create angiotensin I. A final step cleaves angiotensin I into angiotensin II, a process achieved by angiotensin-converting enzyme, or ACE, which is released by the lungs. Angiotensin II temporarily increases blood pressure by contracting smaller blood vessels. It also induces the release of aldosterone from the adrenal cortex of the kidneys. Aldosterone directly stimulates the reabsorption of sodium and the excretion of potassium by the kidneys to maintain electrolyte balance. Moreover, circulating levels of aldosterone stimulate the release of antidiuretic hormone, or ADH, by the hypothalamus in the brain. Upon reaching the kidneys, ADH upregulates aquaporin channels in the nephrons which increase the water retention in the blood vessels. The combined effects of

 Core: Biology

Blood Pressure Measurement

JoVE 10083

Source: Meghan Fashjian, ACNP-BC, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston MA


The term blood pressure (BP) describes lateral pressures produced by blood upon the vessel walls. BP is a vital sign obtained routinely in hospital and outpatient settings, and is one of the most common medical assessments performed around…

 Physical Examinations I

Noninvasive Blood Pressure Measurement Techniques

JoVE 10478

Source: Hamna J. Qureshi and Craig J. Goergen, Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana



Here we will highlight the key similarities and differences of noninvasive blood pressure measurement techniques between humans and rodents and examine the engineering principles…

 Biomedical Engineering

Peripheral Vascular Exam

JoVE 10122

Source: Joseph Donroe, MD, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT


The prevalence of peripheral vascular disease (PVD) increases with age and is a significant cause of morbidity in older patients, and peripheral artery disease (PAD) is associated with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications.…

 Physical Examinations I

Filtration

JoVE 10891

The function of the kidneys is to filter, reabsorb, secrete, and excrete. Every day the kidneys filter nearly 180 liters of blood, initially removing water and solutes but ultimately returning nearly all filtrates into circulation with the help of osmoregulatory hormones. This process removes wastes and toxins but is also crucial to maintain water and electrolyte levels. Most of these functions are performed by the tiny but numerous nephrons contained within the kidneys. Blood enters the renal corpuscle of the nephron through a glomerulus of capillaries. The capillaries are surrounded by a structure called the Bowman’s capsule which absorbs water and most solutes from the blood. The blood pressure from capillaries pushes these into the capsules. If the blood pressure is too high, as seen in hypertension, the capillaries can weaken and harden, reducing the ability of the kidney to filter the blood. The filtrate from the corpuscles empty into the proximal convoluted tubules and the descending portions of the Loop of Henle. Here nearly 70% of solutes—salt, glucose, amino acids, and bicarbonates—are reabsorbed into the surrounding capillaries. Circulating blood hormones involved in osmoregulation induce reabsorption of sodium, calcium, or more water if needed to increase or decrease blood pressure and regulate electrolytes. Sec

 Core: Biology
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