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Parahippocampal Gyrus: A convolution on the inferior surface of each cerebral hemisphere, lying between the hippocampal and collateral sulci. (Dorland, 28th ed)

Optogenetic Entrainment of Hippocampal Theta Oscillations in Behaving Mice

1Systems Neurophysiology Research Group, Institute of Clinical Neuroscience and Medical Psychology, Medical Faculty, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, 2Behavioural Neurodynamics Group, Leibniz Institute for Molecular Pharmacology (FMP)/ NeuroCure Cluster of Excellence, 3Neuronal Circuits and Behavior Research Group, Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research

JoVE 57349


 Neuroscience

High-resolution In Vivo Manual Segmentation Protocol for Human Hippocampal Subfields Using 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging

1Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, 2Computational Brain Anatomy Laboratory, Douglas Institute, McGill University, 3McGill Centre for Studies in Aging, McGill University, 4MRI Unit, Research Imaging Centre, Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 5Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, 6School of Psychology, University of Wollongong, 7Neuroscience Research Australia, 8Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, 9Kimel Family Translational Imaging Genetics Research Laboratory, Research Imaging Centre, Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

JoVE 51861


 Neuroscience

Visual Attention: fMRI Investigation of Object-based Attentional Control

JoVE 10272

Source: Laboratories of Jonas T. Kaplan and Sarah I. Gimbel— University of Southern California

The human visual system is incredibly sophisticated and capable of processing large amounts of information very quickly. However, the brain's capacity to process information is not an unlimited resource. Attention, the ability to selectively process information that is relevant to current goals and to ignore information that is not, is therefore an essential part of visual perception. Some aspects of attention are automatic, while others are subject to voluntary, conscious control. In this experiment we explore the mechanisms of voluntary, or "top-down" attentional control on visual processing. This experiment leverages the orderly organization of visual cortex to examine how top-down attention can selectively modulate the processing of visual stimuli. Certain regions of the visual cortex appear to be specialized for processing specific visual items. Specifically, work by Kanwisher et al.1 has identified an area in the fusiform gyrus of the inferior temporal lobe that is significantly more active when subjects view faces compared to when they observe other common objects. This area has come to be known as the Fusiform Face Area (FFA). Another brain region, known as the Para


 Neuropsychology

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