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Physiological Processes: The functions and activities of living organisms that support life in single- or multi-cellular organisms from their origin through the progression of life.

Physiological Correlates of Emotion Recognition

JoVE 10297

Source: Laboratories of Jonas T. Kaplan and Sarah I. Gimbel—University of Southern California


The autonomic nervous system (ANS) controls the activity of the body's internal organs and regulates changes in their activity depending on the current environment. The vagus nerve, which innervates many of the internal organs, is an…

 Neuropsychology

The Scientific Method

JoVE 11018

Research is what makes the difference between facts and opinions. Facts are observable realities, and opinions are personal judgments, conclusions, or attitudes that may or may not be accurate. In the scientific community, facts can be established only using evidence collected through empirical research.



The Process of Scientific Research



 Core: Psychology

Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging

JoVE 10393

Source: Frederick W. Damen and Craig J. Goergen, Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana


In this video, high field, small-bore magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with physiological monitoring is demonstrated to acquire gated cine loops of the murine cardiovascular system. This…

 Biomedical Engineering

Rodent Handling and Restraint Techniques

JoVE 10221

Source: Kay Stewart, RVT, RLATG, CMAR; Valerie A. Schroeder, RVT, RLATG. University of Notre Dame, IN 


It has been demonstrated that even minimal handling of mice and rats is stressful to the animals. Handling for cage changing and other noninvasive procedures causes an increase in heart rate, blood pressure, and other physiological…

 Lab Animal Research

Serial Dilutions and Plating: Microbial Enumeration

JoVE 10507

Source: Jonathan F. Blaize1, Elizabeth Suter1, and Christopher P. Corbo1
1 Department of Biological Sciences, Wagner College, 1 Campus Road, Staten Island NY, 10301


Quantitative assessment of prokaryotes can be onerous given their abundance, propensity for exponential proliferation, species diversity within a population, and specific …

 Microbiology

The Simple Experiment: Two-group Design

JoVE 10056

Source: Laboratories of Gary Lewandowski, Dave Strohmetz, and Natalie Ciarocco—Monmouth University



A two-group design is the simplest way to establish a cause-effect relationship between two variables. This video demonstrates a simple experiment (two-group design).  In providing an overview of…

 Experimental Psychology

Allergic Reactions

JoVE 10901

We speak of an allergy when the immune system triggers a response against a benign foreign structure, like food, pollen or pet dander. These elicitors are called allergens. If the immune system of a hypersensitive individual was primed against a specific allergen, it will trigger allergic symptoms during every subsequent encounter of the allergen. Symptoms can be mild, such as hay fever, to severe, such as potentially fatal anaphylactic shock. The immune system is crucial for defending an organism against bacteria, viruses, fungi, toxins, and parasites. However, in a hypersensitive response, it can be triggered by harmless substances and cause unpleasant or potentially life-threatening overreactions, called allergies. The first step toward establishing an allergy is sensitization. For instance, an individual becomes allergic to the pollen of ragweed when, for the first time, immune cells in the respiratory passage take up the pollen and degrade the allergens into fragments. These immune cells are called antigen-presenting cells, or APCs, because they display the degraded allergen fragments on their surface. Examples of APCs are dendritic cells, macrophages and B cells. Subsequently, APCs activate encountered Type 2 helper T cells (Th2). The activated Th2 then release chemical signals (e.g., cytokines) that cause B cells to differen

 Core: Biology

Development of the Chick

JoVE 5155

The chicken embryo (Gallus gallus domesticus) provides an economical and accessible model for developmental biology research. Chicks develop rapidly and are amenable to genetic and physiological manipulations, allowing researchers to investigate developmental pathways down to the cell and molecular levels.


This video review of chick development begins by describing the…

 Biology II

Cognitive Dissonance

JoVE 11060

Social psychologists have documented that feeling good about ourselves and maintaining positive self-esteem is a powerful motivator of human behavior (Tavris & Aronson, 2008). In the United States, members of the predominant culture typically think very highly of themselves and view themselves as good people who are above average on many desirable traits (Ehrlinger, Gilovich, & Ross,…

 Core: Psychology
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