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Cranial Nerves Exam II (VII-XII)

JoVE 10005

Source:Tracey A. Milligan, MD; Tamara B. Kaplan, MD; Neurology, Brigham and Women's/Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA


The cranial nerve examination follows the mental status evaluation in a neurological exam. However, the examination begins with observations made upon greeting…

 Physical Examinations III

X-linked Traits

JoVE 10980

In most mammalian species, females have two X sex chromosomes and males have an X and Y. As a result, mutations on the X chromosome in females may be masked by the presence of a normal allele on the second X. In contrast, a mutation on the X chromosome in males more often causes observable biological defects, as there is no normal X to compensate. Trait variations arising from mutations on the X chromosome are called “X-linked”. One well-studied example of an X-linked trait is color blindness. When a mutation occurs in the genes responsible for red and green color vision in the photoreceptors of the retina, color blindness may occur. While this recessive mutation can cause females to be color blind, they must possess two mutated X chromosomes. Color blindness is much more common in males, who only have one X chromosome and therefore no second copy to potentially compensate for the mutation. Color blindness is passed from mother to son; a mutated X will be passed from the mother to half of her sons, who receive a Y from their father. Meanwhile, colorblind males will pass on the allele for color blindness to all of their daughters, who will be either carriers or color blind, depending on the maternal allele received. Occasionally, this type of X-linked mutation can also arise by spontaneous mutation and not as the result of inheritance from mother o

 Core: Biology

Recombinant DNA

JoVE 10808

Scientists create recombinant DNA by combining DNA from different sources—often, other species—in the laboratory. DNA cloning allows researchers to study specific genes by inserting them into easily manipulated cells, such as bacteria. Organisms that contain recombinant DNA are known as genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Recombinant DNA technology produces organisms with new genes that can benefit science, medicine, and agriculture. Creation of recombinant DNA involves inserting a gene of interest into a vector—a vehicle that carries foreign DNA into host cells for DNA replication and protein expression. The most commonly used cloning vectors are plasmids, small circular pieces of DNA that replicate independently from the host’s chromosomal DNA. To create recombinant DNA, both the donor DNA, including the gene of interest, and the vector are cut at specific nucleotide sequences—called restriction sites—using restriction enzymes. The enzyme DNA ligase seals the sugar-phosphate backbone where the gene of interest and plasmid connect. The result is a recombinant DNA molecule consisting of a vector with an integrated piece of donor DNA—called an insert. A scientist may then introduce this hybrid DNA molecule into a host organism—typically bacteria or yeast—where it easily and rapidly replicat

 Core: Biology

Cranial Nerves Exam I (I-VI)

JoVE 10091

Source:Tracey A. Milligan, MD; Tamara B. Kaplan, MD; Neurology, Brigham and Women's/Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA


During each section of the neurological testing, the examiner uses the powers of observation to assess the patient. In some cases, cranial nerve dysfunction is readily apparent: a patient might…

 Physical Examinations III

Systematic Assessment of Well-Being in Mice for Procedures Using General Anesthesia

1Institute of Animal Welfare, Animal Behavior and Laboratory Animal Science, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Freie Universität Berlin, 2Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Freie Universität Berlin, 3German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), 4Unit of Physiology, Pathophysiology and Experimental Endocrinology, Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Veterinary Medicine

JoVE 57046

 Behavior
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