Standardized Colon Ascendens Stent Peritonitis in Rats - a Simple, Feasible Animal Model to Induce Septic Acute Kidney Injury

1Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Center, 2Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care, University of Würzburg, 3Department of General, Visceral, Vascular and Paediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery I, University of Würzburg, 4Department of Internal Medicine I, Division of Nephrology, University Hospital Würzburg, 5Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, West Virginia University School of Medicine
This article has been accepted and is currently in production

Abstract

AKI in septic patients is associated with increased mortality and poor outcome despite major efforts to refine the understanding of its pathophysiology. Here, an in vivo model is presented that combines a standardized septic focus to induce AKI and an intensive care (ICU) setup to provide an advanced hemodynamic monitoring and therapy comparable in human sepsis. Sepsis is induced by standardized colon ascendens stent peritonitis (sCASP). AKI is investigated functionally by measurement of blood and urine samples as well as histologically by evaluation of histopathological scores. Furthermore, the advanced hemodynamic monitoring and the possibility of repetitive blood gas sampling enable a differentiated analysis of severity of induced sepsis.

The sCASP method is a standardized, reliable and reproducible method to induce septic AKI. The intensive care setup, continuous hemodynamic and gas exchange monitoring, low mortality rate as well as the opportunity of detailed analyses of kidney function and impairments are advantages of this setup. Therefore, the described method may serve as a new standard for experimental investigations of septic AKI.