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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Cardiovascular Risk Factors One Year After a Hypertensive Disorder of Pregnancy.
J Womens Health (Larchmt)
PUBLISHED: 09-24-2014
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Abstract Objective: To identify differences in women's cardiovascular risk, independent of obesity, one year after delivery of a pregnancy complicated by a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy (HDP). Methods: We compared traditional and novel cardiovascular risk factors of women recruited at delivery following the diagnosis of an HDP with those of women with uncomplicated pregnancies, at 3 months and 12-18 months postpartum. Measures included blood pressure, fasting lipids, inflammatory biomarkers, and measures of insulin resistance. Multiple linear regressions were used to adjust for body mass index (BMI) and other characteristics. Results: We studied 71 subjects: 31 women with HDP and 40 with an uncomplicated pregnancy. There were no significant differences between groups for total cholesterol, HDL-c, LDL-c, triglycerides, HgbA1c, or homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance. Values for tumor necrosis factor-? were significantly higher in the HDP group (p<0.01), while those for interleukin-6 and c-reactive protein were not. A diagnosis of HDP was associated with a 9?mm Hg difference in systolic blood pressure at both 3 months and 1 year, after adjustment for age, BMI, race, family history of cardiovascular disease, tobacco use, and insurance. Conclusions: Women with HDP had significantly higher blood pressure 3 months and 1 year after delivery, independent of obesity. There were no significant differences in lipids or measures of insulin resistance after adjusting for BMI. Elevated blood pressure may account for the observed associations between HDP and future cardiovascular disease.
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Minimizing the biodiversity impact of Neotropical oil palm development.
Glob Chang Biol
PUBLISHED: 08-30-2014
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Oil palm agriculture is rapidly expanding in the Neotropics, at the expense of a range of natural and seminatural habitats. A key question is how this expansion should be managed to reduce negative impacts on biodiversity. Focusing on the Llanos of Colombia, a mixed grassland-forest system identified as a priority zone for future oil palm development, we survey communities of ants, dung beetles, birds and herpetofauna occurring in oil palm plantations and the other principal form of agriculture in the region - improved cattle pasture - together with those of surrounding natural forests. We show that oil palm plantations have similar or higher species richness across all four taxonomic groups than improved pasture. For dung beetles, species richness in oil palm was equal to that of forest, whereas the other three taxa had highest species richness in forests. Hierarchical modelling of species occupancy probabilities indicated that oil palm plantations supported a higher proportion of species characteristic of forests than did cattle pastures. Across the bird community, occupancy probabilities within oil palm were positively influenced by increasing forest cover in a surrounding 250 m radius, whereas surrounding forest cover did not strongly influence the occurrence of other taxonomic groups in oil palm. Overall, our results suggest that the conversion of existing improved pastures to oil palm has limited negative impacts on biodiversity. As such, existing cattle pastures of the Colombian Llanos could offer a key opportunity to meet governmental targets for oil palm development without incurring significant biodiversity costs. Our results also highlight the value of preserving remnant forests within these agricultural landscapes, protecting high biodiversity and exporting avian 'spill-over' effects into oil palm plantations.
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A global strategy for road building.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 08-27-2014
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The number and extent of roads will expand dramatically this century. Globally, at least 25 million kilometres of new roads are anticipated by 2050; a 60% increase in the total length of roads over that in 2010. Nine-tenths of all road construction is expected to occur in developing nations, including many regions that sustain exceptional biodiversity and vital ecosystem services. Roads penetrating into wilderness or frontier areas are a major proximate driver of habitat loss and fragmentation, wildfires, overhunting and other environmental degradation, often with irreversible impacts on ecosystems. Unfortunately, much road proliferation is chaotic or poorly planned, and the rate of expansion is so great that it often overwhelms the capacity of environmental planners and managers. Here we present a global scheme for prioritizing road building. This large-scale zoning plan seeks to limit the environmental costs of road expansion while maximizing its benefits for human development, by helping to increase agricultural production, which is an urgent priority given that global food demand could double by mid-century. Our analysis identifies areas with high environmental values where future road building should be avoided if possible, areas where strategic road improvements could promote agricultural development with relatively modest environmental costs, and 'conflict areas' where road building could have sizeable benefits for agriculture but with serious environmental damage. Our plan provides a template for proactively zoning and prioritizing roads during the most explosive era of road expansion in human history.
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A high-throughput SNP array in the amphidiploid species Brassica napus shows diversity in resistance genes.
Funct. Integr. Genomics
PUBLISHED: 08-22-2014
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Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)are molecular markers based on nucleotide variation and can be used for genotyping assays across populations and to track genomic inheritance. SNPs offer a comprehensive genotyping alternative to whole-genome sequencing for both agricultural and research purposes including molecular breeding and diagnostics, genome evolution and genetic diversity analyses, genetic mapping, and trait association studies. Here genomic SNPs were discovered between four cultivars of the important amphidiploid oilseed species Brassica napus and used to develop a B. napus Infinium™ array containing 5,306 SNPs randomly dispersed across the genome. Assay success was high, with >94 % of these producing a reproducible, polymorphic genotype in the 1,070 samples screened. Although the assay was designed to B. napus, successful SNP amplification was achieved in the B. napus progenitor species, Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea, and to a lesser extent in the related species Brassica nigra. Phylogenetic analysis was consistent with the expected relationships between B. napus individuals. This study presents an efficient custom SNP assay development pipeline in the complex polyploid Brassica genome and demonstrates the utility of the array for high-throughput genotyping in a number of related Brassica species. It also demonstrates the utility of this assay in genotyping resistance genes on chromosome A7, which segregate amongst the 1,070 samples.
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Identification and characterization of more than 4 million intervarietal SNPs across the group 7 chromosomes of bread wheat.
Plant Biotechnol. J.
PUBLISHED: 08-22-2014
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Despite being a major international crop, our understanding of the wheat genome is relatively poor due to its large size and complexity. To gain a greater understanding of wheat genome diversity, we have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms between 16 Australian bread wheat varieties. Whole-genome shotgun Illumina paired read sequence data were mapped to the draft assemblies of chromosomes 7A, 7B and 7D to identify more than 4 million intervarietal SNPs. SNP density varied between the three genomes, with much greater density observed on the A and B genomes than the D genome. This variation may be a result of substantial gene flow from the tetraploid Triticum turgidum, which possesses A and B genomes, during early co-cultivation of tetraploid and hexaploid wheat. In addition, we examined SNP density variation along the chromosome syntenic builds and identified genes in low-density regions which may have been selected during domestication and breeding. This study highlights the impact of evolution and breeding on the bread wheat genome and provides a substantial resource for trait association and crop improvement. All SNP data are publically available on a generic genome browser GBrowse at www.wheatgenome.info.
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Plant genetics. Early allopolyploid evolution in the post-Neolithic Brassica napus oilseed genome.
Science
PUBLISHED: 08-21-2014
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Oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) was formed ~7500 years ago by hybridization between B. rapa and B. oleracea, followed by chromosome doubling, a process known as allopolyploidy. Together with more ancient polyploidizations, this conferred an aggregate 72× genome multiplication since the origin of angiosperms and high gene content. We examined the B. napus genome and the consequences of its recent duplication. The constituent An and Cn subgenomes are engaged in subtle structural, functional, and epigenetic cross-talk, with abundant homeologous exchanges. Incipient gene loss and expression divergence have begun. Selection in B. napus oilseed types has accelerated the loss of glucosinolate genes, while preserving expansion of oil biosynthesis genes. These processes provide insights into allopolyploid evolution and its relationship with crop domestication and improvement.
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Arterial stiffness and wave reflection 1 year after a pregnancy complicated by hypertension.
J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich)
PUBLISHED: 08-13-2014
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Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) later in life. The authors investigated the association of HDP with blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness 1-year postpartum. Seventy-four participants, 33 with an HDP and 41 with uncomplicated pregnancies, were examined using applanation tonometry to measure BP, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), and augmentation index (AIx). On average, women with HDP had a 9 mm higher systolic BP (P<.01), 0.8 m/s faster cfPWV (P=.09), and 5.4% greater AIx (P=.09) at the 1-year examination. After adjustment for covariates, there was no significant difference in cfPWV between groups, while a 7.3% greater AIx (P<.05) remained. These findings suggest that reduced endothelial function may be detected 1 year after HDP. Large prospective studies are needed to further understand the contribution of arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction in the evolution of CVD after these complicated pregnancies.
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Differences in vaginal microbiome in African American women versus women of European ancestry.
Microbiology (Reading, Engl.)
PUBLISHED: 07-29-2014
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Women of European ancestry are more likely to harbour a Lactobacillus-dominated microbiome, whereas African American women are more likely to exhibit a diverse microbial profile. African American women are also twice as likely to be diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis and are twice as likely to experience preterm birth. The objective of this study was to further characterize and contrast the vaginal microbial profiles in African American versus European ancestry women. Through the Vaginal Human Microbiome Project at Virginia Commonwealth University, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis was used to compare the microbiomes of vaginal samples from 1268 African American women and 416 women of European ancestry. The results confirmed significant differences in the vaginal microbiomes of the two groups and identified several taxa relevant to these differences. Major community types were dominated by Gardnerella vaginalis and the uncultivated bacterial vaginosis-associated bacterium-1 (BVAB1) that were common among African Americans. Moreover, the prevalence of multiple bacterial taxa that are associated with microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity and preterm birth, including Mycoplasma, Gardnerella, Prevotella and Sneathia, differed between the two ethnic groups. We investigated the contributions of intrinsic and extrinsic factors, including pregnancy, body mass index, diet, smoking and alcohol use, number of sexual partners, and household income, to vaginal community composition. Ethnicity, pregnancy and alcohol use correlated significantly with the relative abundance of bacterial vaginosis-associated species. Trends between microbial profiles and smoking and number of sexual partners were observed; however, these associations were not statistically significant. These results support and extend previous findings that there are significant differences in the vaginal microbiome related to ethnicity and demonstrate that these differences are pronounced even in healthy women.
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Magnetic resonance imaging of the preterm infant brain.
Curr Pediatr Rev
PUBLISHED: 07-25-2014
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Despite improvements in neonatal care, survivors of preterm birth are still at a significantly increased risk of developing life-long neurological difficulties including cerebral palsy and cognitive difficulties. Cranial ultrasound is routinely used in neonatal practice, but has a low sensitivity for identifying later neurodevelopmental difficulties. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be used to identify intracranial abnormalities with greater diagnostic accuracy in preterm infants, and theoretically might improve the planning and targeting of long-term neurodevelopmental care; reducing parental stress and unplanned healthcare utilisation; and ultimately may improve healthcare cost effectiveness. Furthermore, MR imaging offers the advantage of allowing the quantitative assessment of the integrity, growth and function of intracranial structures, thereby providing the means to develop sensitive biomarkers which may be predictive of later neurological impairment. However further work is needed to define the accuracy and value of diagnosis by MR and the techniques's precise role in care pathways for preterm infants.
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Cardiac function is preserved following 4 weeks of voluntary wheel running in a rodent model of chronic kidney disease.
J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 07-24-2014
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The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of 4 wk of voluntary wheel running on cardiac performance in the 5/6 ablation-infarction (AI) rat model of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We hypothesized that voluntary wheel running would be effective in preserving cardiac function in AI. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three study groups: 1) sham, sedentary nondiseased control; 2) AI-SED, sedentary AI; and 3) AI-WR, wheel-running AI. Animals were maintained over a total period of 8 wk following AI and sham surgery. The 8-wk period included 4 wk of disease development followed by a 4-wk voluntary wheel-running intervention/sedentary control period. Cardiac performance was assessed using an isolated working heart preparation. Left ventricular (LV) tissue was used for biochemical tissue analysis. In addition, soleus muscle citrate synthase activity was measured. AI-WR rats performed a low volume of exercise, running an average of 13 ± 2 km, which resulted in citrate synthase activity not different from that in sham animals. Isolated AI-SED hearts demonstrated impaired cardiac performance at baseline and in response to preload/afterload manipulations. Conversely, cardiac function was preserved in AI-WR vs. sham hearts. LV nitrite + nitrate and expression of LV nitric oxide (NO) synthase isoforms 2 and 3 in AI-WR were not different from those of sham rats. In addition, LV H2O2 in AI-WR was similar to that of sham and associated with increased expression of LV superoxide-dismutase-2 and glutathione peroxidase-1/2. The findings of the current study suggest that a low-volume exercise intervention is sufficient to maintain cardiac performance in rats with CKD, potentially through a mechanism related to improved redox homeostasis and increased NO.
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Safety of Varenicline Tartrate and Counseling Versus Counseling Alone for Smoking Cessation: A Randomized Controlled Trial for Inpatients (STOP Study).
Nicotine Tob. Res.
PUBLISHED: 07-16-2014
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Inpatient medical settings offer an opportunistic environment for initiating smoking cessation interventions to patients reflecting on their health. Current evidence has shown the superior efficacy of varenicline tartrate (VT) for smoking cessation compared with other tobacco cessation therapies; however, recent evidence also has highlighted concerns about the safety and tolerability of VT. Given these apprehensions, we aimed to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of VT plus quitline-counseling compared to quitline-counseling alone in the inpatient medical setting.
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Effects of hypothermia for perinatal asphyxia on childhood outcomes.
N. Engl. J. Med.
PUBLISHED: 07-10-2014
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In the Total Body Hypothermia for Neonatal Encephalopathy Trial (TOBY), newborns with asphyxial encephalopathy who received hypothermic therapy had improved neurologic outcomes at 18 months of age, but it is uncertain whether such therapy results in longer-term neurocognitive benefits.
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Voluntary wheel running augments aortic l-arginine transport and endothelial function in rats with chronic kidney disease.
Am. J. Physiol. Renal Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 06-25-2014
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Reduced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis contributes to risk for cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Vascular uptake of the NO precursor l-arginine (ARG) is attenuated in rodents with CKD, resulting in reduced substrate availability for NO synthesis and impaired vascular function. We tested the effect of 4 wk of voluntary wheel running (RUN) and/or ARG supplementation on endothelium-dependent relaxation (EDR) in rats with CKD. Twelve-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent ? ablation infarction surgery to induce CKD, or SHAM surgery as a control. Beginning 4 wk following surgery, CKD animals either remained sedentary (SED) or received one of the following interventions: supplemental ARG, RUN, or combined RUN+ARG. Animals were euthanized 8 wk after surgery, and EDR was assessed. EDR was significantly impaired in SED vs. SHAM animals after 8 wk, in response to ACh (10(-9)-10(-5) M) as indicated by a reduced area under the curve (AUC; 44.56 ± 9.01 vs 100 ± 4.58, P < 0.05) and reduced maximal response (Emax; 59.9 ± 9.67 vs. 94.31 ± 1.27%, P < 0.05). AUC was not improved by ARG treatment but was significantly improved above SED animals in both RUN and RUN+ARG-treated animals. Maximal relaxation was elevated above SED in RUN+ARG animals only. l-[(3)H]arginine uptake was impaired in both SED and ARG animals and was improved in RUN and RUN+ARG animals. The results suggest that voluntary wheel running is an effective therapy to improve vascular function in CKD and may be more beneficial when combined with l-arginine.
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Conformal mapping in optical biosensor applications.
J Math Biol
PUBLISHED: 06-13-2014
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Optical biosensors are devices used to investigate surface-volume reaction kinetics. Current mathematical models for reaction dynamics rely on the assumption of unidirectional flow within these devices. However, new devices, such as the Flexchip, include a geometry that introduces two-dimensional flow, complicating the depletion of the volume reactant. To account for this, a previous mathematical model is extended to include two-dimensional flow, and the Schwarz-Christoffel mapping is used to relate the physical device geometry to that for a device with unidirectional flow. Mappings for several Flexchip dimensions are considered, and the ligand depletion effect is investigated for one of these mappings. Estimated rate constants are produced for simulated data to quantify the inclusion of two-dimensional flow in the mathematical model.
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Structural variations in plant genomes.
Brief Funct Genomics
PUBLISHED: 06-06-2014
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Differences between plant genomes range from single nucleotide polymorphisms to large-scale duplications, deletions and rearrangements. The large polymorphisms are termed structural variants (SVs). SVs have received significant attention in human genetics and were found to be responsible for various chronic diseases. However, little effort has been directed towards understanding the role of SVs in plants. Many recent advances in plant genetics have resulted from improvements in high-resolution technologies for measuring SVs, including microarray-based techniques, and more recently, high-throughput DNA sequencing. In this review we describe recent reports of SV in plants and describe the genomic technologies currently used to measure these SVs.
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Multiple surface reactions in arrays with applications to optical biosensors.
Bull. Math. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2014
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We analyze surface-volume reactions in the context of optical biosensors with arrays of reacting zones. For arrays having zones with the same rate constants, we consider a two-dimensional reacting zone boundary definition and quantify ligand depletion with the effective Damköhler number. We use asymptotics to obtain ligand depletion results for the one-dimensional case, and also compute results for the circular reacting zone case. For arrays having zones with different rate constants, depletion effects cannot be expressed as the product of time-dependent and space-dependent terms, and we propose two effective rate constant equations for this case.
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A mutation causing Brugada syndrome identifies a mechanism for altered autonomic and oxidant regulation of cardiac sodium currents.
Circ Cardiovasc Genet
PUBLISHED: 05-02-2014
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The mechanisms of the electrocardiographic changes and arrhythmias in Brugada syndrome (BrS) remain controversial. Mutations in the sodium channel gene, SCN5A, and regulatory proteins that reduce or eliminate sodium current (INa) have been linked to BrS. We studied the properties of a BrS-associated SCN5A mutation in a protein kinase A (PKA) consensus phosphorylation site, R526H.
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Optimizing carbon storage and biodiversity protection in tropical agricultural landscapes.
Glob Chang Biol
PUBLISHED: 04-25-2014
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With the rapidly expanding ecological footprint of agriculture, the design of farmed landscapes will play an increasingly important role for both carbon storage and biodiversity protection. Carbon and biodiversity can be enhanced by integrating natural habitats into agricultural lands, but a key question is whether benefits are maximized by including many small features throughout the landscape ('land-sharing' agriculture) or a few large contiguous blocks alongside intensive farmland ('land-sparing' agriculture). In this study, we are the first to integrate carbon storage alongside multi-taxa biodiversity assessments to compare land-sparing and land-sharing frameworks. We do so by sampling carbon stocks and biodiversity (birds and dung beetles) in landscapes containing agriculture and forest within the Colombian Chocó-Andes, a zone of high global conservation priority. We show that woodland fragments embedded within a matrix of cattle pasture hold less carbon per unit area than contiguous primary or advanced secondary forests (>15 years). Farmland sites also support less diverse bird and dung beetle communities than contiguous forests, even when farmland retains high levels of woodland habitat cover. Landscape simulations based on these data suggest that land-sparing strategies would be more beneficial for both carbon storage and biodiversity than land-sharing strategies across a range of production levels. Biodiversity benefits of land-sparing are predicted to be similar whether spared lands protect primary or advanced secondary forests, owing to the close similarity of bird and dung beetle communities between the two forest classes. Land-sparing schemes that encourage the protection and regeneration of natural forest blocks thus provide a synergy between carbon and biodiversity conservation, and represent a promising strategy for reducing the negative impacts of agriculture on tropical ecosystems. However, further studies examining a wider range of ecosystem services will be necessary to fully understand the links between land-allocation strategies and long-term ecosystem service provision.
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NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species contribute to impaired cutaneous microvascular function in chronic kidney disease.
Am. J. Physiol. Renal Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-23-2014
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Oxidative stress promotes vascular dysfunction in chronic kidney disease (CKD). We utilized the cutaneous circulation to test the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species derived from NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase impair nitric oxide (NO)-dependent cutaneous vasodilation in CKD. Twenty subjects, 10 stage 3 and 4 patients with CKD (61 ± 4 yr; 5 men/5 women; eGFR: 39 ± 4 ml·min(-1)·1.73 m(-2)) and 10 healthy controls (55 ± 2 yr; 4 men/6 women; eGFR: >60 ml·min(-1)·1.73 m(-2)) were instrumented with 4 intradermal microdialysis fibers for the delivery of 1) Ringer solution (Control), 2) 10 ?M tempol (scavenge superoxide), 3) 100 ?M apocynin (NAD(P)H oxidase inhibition), and 4) 10 ?M allopurinol (xanthine oxidase inhibition). Skin blood flow was measured via laser-Doppler flowmetry during standardized local heating (42°C). N(g)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 10 mM) was infused to quantify the NO-dependent portion of the response. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as a percentage of the maximum CVC achieved during sodium nitroprusside infusion at 43°C. Cutaneous vasodilation was attenuated in patients with CKD (77 ± 3 vs. 88 ± 3%, P = 0.01), but augmented with tempol and apocynin (tempol: 88 ± 2 (P = 0.03), apocynin: 91 ± 2% (P = 0.001). The NO-dependent portion of the response was reduced in patients with CKD (41 ± 4 vs. 58 ± 2%, P = 0.04), but improved with tempol and apocynin (tempol: 58 ± 3 (P = 0.03), apocynin: 58 ± 4% (P = 0.03). Inhibition of xanthine oxidase did not alter cutaneous vasodilation in either group (P > 0.05). These data suggest that NAD(P)H oxidase is a source of reactive oxygen species and contributes to microvascular dysfunction in patients with CKD.
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The Brassica oleracea genome reveals the asymmetrical evolution of polyploid genomes.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 04-22-2014
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Polyploidization has provided much genetic variation for plant adaptive evolution, but the mechanisms by which the molecular evolution of polyploid genomes establishes genetic architecture underlying species differentiation are unclear. Brassica is an ideal model to increase knowledge of polyploid evolution. Here we describe a draft genome sequence of Brassica oleracea, comparing it with that of its sister species B. rapa to reveal numerous chromosome rearrangements and asymmetrical gene loss in duplicated genomic blocks, asymmetrical amplification of transposable elements, differential gene co-retention for specific pathways and variation in gene expression, including alternative splicing, among a large number of paralogous and orthologous genes. Genes related to the production of anticancer phytochemicals and morphological variations illustrate consequences of genome duplication and gene divergence, imparting biochemical and morphological variation to B. oleracea. This study provides insights into Brassica genome evolution and will underpin research into the many important crops in this genus.
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Lower potassium intake is associated with increased wave reflection in young healthy adults.
Nutr J
PUBLISHED: 04-22-2014
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Increased potassium intake has been shown to lower blood pressure (BP) even in the presence of high sodium consumption however the role of dietary potassium on vascular function has received less attention. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between habitual intake of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) and measures of arterial stiffness and wave reflection.
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Cushing's reflex in a rare case of adult medulloblastoma.
World J Emerg Med
PUBLISHED: 04-06-2014
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Medulloblastoma is a primitive neuro-ectodermal tumor. It is common in childhood, but rarely seen at adult age, comprising only 1% of primary brain tumors.
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The genome sequence of the Antarctic bullhead notothen reveals evolutionary adaptations to a cold environment.
Genome Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-07-2014
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BackgroundAntarctic fish have adapted to the freezing waters of the Southern Ocean. Representative adaptations to this harsh environment include a constitutive heat shock response and the evolution of an antifreeze protein in the blood. Despite their adaptations to the cold, genome-wide studies have not yet been performed on these fish due to the lack of a sequenced genome. Notothenia coriiceps, the Antarctic bullhead notothen, is an endemic teleost fish with a circumpolar distribution and makes a good model to understand the genomic adaptations to constant sub-zero temperatures.ResultsWe provide the draft genome sequence and annotation for N. coriiceps. Comparative genome-wide analysis with other fish genomes shows that mitochondrial proteins and hemoglobin evolved rapidly. Transcriptome analysis of thermal stress responses find alternative response mechanisms for evolution strategies in a cold environment. Loss of the phosphorylation-dependent sumoylation motif in heat shock factor 1 suggests that the heat shock response evolved into a simple and rapid phosphorylation-independent regulatory mechanism. Rapidly evolved hemoglobin and the induction of a heat shock response in the blood may support the efficient supply of oxygen to cold-adapted mitochondria.ConclusionsOur data and analysis suggest that evolutionary strategies in efficient aerobic cellular respiration are controlled by hemoglobin and mitochondrial proteins, which may be important for the adaptation of Antarctic fish to their environment. The use of genome data from the Antarctic endemic fish provides an invaluable resource providing evidence of evolutionary adaptation and can be applied to other studies of Antarctic fish.
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Toward the redesign of nutrition delivery.
J Control Release
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2014
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In the facilitation of widespread access to low-cost, good tasting food, the global food system has relied on the use of fat, sugar, chemical processing aids and plastics, among other elements potentially detrimental to human health and the environment. This contrasts starkly with the strategies of natural nutrition delivery systems. Rich in vitamins, minerals, and other substances of functional benefit to human health, natural delivery systems, such as fruits and vegetables, retain their physical and chemical stability in a range of conditions over relatively long times through protective skins and shells that can either be eaten or degrade rapidly and fully in nature. Frequently natural foods can be delivered in small (even extremely small) portions, as with berries, insects, plankton and krill, permitting portion control and the rapid and efficient delivery of functional nutrition in inherently mobile circumstances. These and other qualities, which have insured the sustainable and healthy nourishment of animals and humans for at least tens of thousands of years, are often absent from today's man-made food and beverage delivery systems. With growing awareness of the liabilities to maintaining the food system of today, efforts are now underway to redesign nutrition delivery so as to provide the contemporary benefits of global access while retrieving the health and environmental benefits associated with natural delivery systems. We review these here, with special attention to recently commercialized nutritional delivery systems emerging from the drug delivery field aimed at reducing waste in food and beverage (nutritional aerosols) and eliminating waste in food and beverage packaging (edible skins). We briefly discuss the potential ramifications to how we will eat tomorrow.
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Brain development in preterm infants assessed using advanced MRI techniques.
Clin Perinatol
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2014
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Infants who are born preterm have a high incidence of neurocognitive and neurobehavioral abnormalities, which may be associated with impaired brain development. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approaches, such as diffusion MRI (d-MRI) and functional MRI (fMRI), provide objective and reproducible measures of brain development. Indices derived from d-MRI can be used to provide quantitative measures of preterm brain injury. Although fMRI of the neonatal brain is currently a research tool, future studies combining d-MRI and fMRI have the potential to assess the structural and functional properties of the developing brain and its response to injury.
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Maintaining ecosystem function and services in logged tropical forests.
Trends Ecol. Evol. (Amst.)
PUBLISHED: 02-14-2014
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Vast expanses of tropical forests worldwide are being impacted by selective logging. We evaluate the environmental impacts of such logging and conclude that natural timber-production forests typically retain most of their biodiversity and associated ecosystem functions, as well as their carbon, climatic, and soil-hydrological ecosystem services. Unfortunately, the value of production forests is often overlooked, leaving them vulnerable to further degradation including post-logging clearing, fires, and hunting. Because logged tropical forests are extensive, functionally diverse, and provide many ecosystem services, efforts to expand their role in conservation strategies are urgently needed. Key priorities include improving harvest practices to reduce negative impacts on ecosystem functions and services, and preventing the rapid conversion and loss of logged forests.
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Effect of scale on trait predictors of species responses to agriculture.
Conserv. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2014
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Species persistence in human-altered landscapes can depend on factors operating at multiple spatial scales. To understand anthropogenic impacts on biodiversity, it is useful to examine relationships between species traits and their responses to land-use change. A key knowledge gap concerns whether these relationships vary depending on the scale of response under consideration. We examined how local- and large-scale habitat variables influence the occupancy dynamics of a bird community in cloud forest zones in the Colombian Chocó-Andes. Using data collected across a continuum of forest and agriculture, we examined which traits best predict species responses to local variation in farmland and which traits best predict species responses to isolation from contiguous forest. Global range size was a strong predictor of species responses to agriculture at both scales; widespread species were less likely to decline as local habitat cover decreased and as distance from forest increased. Habitat specialization was a strong predictor of species responses only at the local scale. Open-habitat species were particularly likely to increase as pasture increased, but they were relatively insensitive to variation in distance to forest. Foraging plasticity and flocking behavior were strong predictors of species responses to distance from forest, but not their responses to local habitat. Species with lower plasticity in foraging behaviors and obligate flock-following species were more likely to decline as distance from contiguous forest increased. For species exhibiting these latter traits, persistence in tropical landscapes may depend on the protection of larger contiguous blocks of forest, rather than the integration of smaller-scale woodland areas within farmland. Species listed as threatened or near threatened on the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List were also more likely to decline in response to both local habitat quality and isolation from forest relative to least-concern species, underlining the importance of contiguous forests for threatened taxa.
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SNP markers-based map construction and genome-wide linkage analysis in Brassica napus.
Plant Biotechnol. J.
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2014
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An Illumina Infinium array comprising 5306 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers was used to genotype 175 individuals of a doubled haploid population derived from a cross between Skipton and Ag-Spectrum, two Australian cultivars of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.). A genetic linkage map based on 613 SNP and 228 non-SNP (DArT, SSR, SRAP and candidate gene markers) covering 2514.8 cM was constructed and further utilized to identify loci associated with flowering time and resistance to blackleg, a disease caused by the fungus Leptosphaeria maculans. Comparison between genetic map positions of SNP markers and the sequenced Brassica rapa (A) and Brassica oleracea (C) genome scaffolds showed several genomic rearrangements in the B. napus genome. A major locus controlling resistance to L. maculans was identified at both seedling and adult plant stages on chromosome A07. QTL analyses revealed that up to 40.2% of genetic variation for flowering time was accounted for by loci having quantitative effects. Comparative mapping showed Arabidopsis and Brassica flowering genes such as Phytochrome A/D, Flowering Locus C and agamous-Like MADS box gene AGL1 map within marker intervals associated with flowering time in a DH population from Skipton/Ag-Spectrum. Genomic regions associated with flowering time and resistance to L. maculans had several SNP markers mapped within 10 cM. Our results suggest that SNP markers will be suitable for various applications such as trait introgression, comparative mapping and high-resolution mapping of loci in B. napus.
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Transcriptome and methylome profiling reveals relics of genome dominance in the mesopolyploid Brassica oleracea.
Genome Biol.
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2014
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Brassica oleracea is a valuable vegetable species that has contributed to human health and nutrition for hundreds of years and comprises multiple distinct cultivar groups with diverse morphological and phytochemical attributes. In addition to this phenotypic wealth, B. oleracea offers unique insights into polyploid evolution, as it results from multiple ancestral polyploidy events and a final Brassiceae-specific triplication event. Further, B. oleracea represents one of the diploid genomes that formed the economically important allopolyploid oilseed, Brassica napus. A deeper understanding of B. oleracea genome architecture provides a foundation for crop improvement strategies throughout the Brassica genus.
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A chromosomal genomics approach to assess and validate the desi and kabuli draft chickpea genome assemblies.
Plant Biotechnol. J.
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2014
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With the expansion of next-generation sequencing technology and advanced bioinformatics, there has been a rapid growth of genome sequencing projects. However, while this technology enables the rapid and cost-effective assembly of draft genomes, the quality of these assemblies usually falls short of gold standard genome assemblies produced using the more traditional BAC by BAC and Sanger sequencing approaches. Assembly validation is often performed by the physical anchoring of genetically mapped markers, but this is prone to errors and the resolution is usually low, especially towards centromeric regions where recombination is limited. New approaches are required to validate reference genome assemblies. The ability to isolate individual chromosomes combined with next-generation sequencing permits the validation of genome assemblies at the chromosome level. We demonstrate this approach by the assessment of the recently published chickpea kabuli and desi genomes. While previous genetic analysis suggests that these genomes should be very similar, a comparison of their chromosome sizes and published assemblies highlights significant differences. Our chromosomal genomics analysis highlights short defined regions that appear to have been misassembled in the kabuli genome and identifies large-scale misassembly in the draft desi genome. The integration of chromosomal genomics tools within genome sequencing projects has the potential to significantly improve the construction and validation of genome assemblies. The approach could be applied both for new genome assemblies as well as published assemblies, and complements currently applied genome assembly strategies.
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New technologies for ultrahigh-throughput genotyping in plant taxonomy.
Methods Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2014
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Molecular genetic markers represent one of the most powerful tools for the analysis of variation between plant genomes. Molecular marker technology has developed rapidly over the last decade, with the introduction of new DNA sequencing methods and the development of high-throughput genotyping methods. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) now dominate applications in modern plant genetic analysis. The reducing cost of DNA sequencing and increasing availability of large sequence data sets permit the mining of this data for large numbers of SNPs. These may then be used in applications such as genetic linkage analysis and trait mapping, diversity analysis, association studies, and marker-assisted selection. Here we describe automated methods for the discovery of SNP molecular markers and new technologies for high-throughput, low-cost molecular marker genotyping. Examples include SNP discovery using autoSNPdb and wheatgenome.info as well as SNP genotyping using Illumina's GoldenGate™ and Infinium™ methods.
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Unfolding the secrets of coral-algal symbiosis.
ISME J
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2014
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Dinoflagellates from the genus Symbiodinium form a mutualistic symbiotic relationship with reef-building corals. Here we applied massively parallel Illumina sequencing to assess genetic similarity and diversity among four phylogenetically diverse dinoflagellate clades (A, B, C and D) that are commonly associated with corals. We obtained more than 30?000 predicted genes for each Symbiodinium clade, with a majority of the aligned transcripts corresponding to sequence data sets of symbiotic dinoflagellates and <2% of sequences having bacterial or other foreign origin. We report 1053 genes, orthologous among four Symbiodinium clades, that share a high level of sequence identity to known proteins from the SwissProt (SP) database. Approximately 80% of the transcripts aligning to the 1053 SP genes were unique to Symbiodinium species and did not align to other dinoflagellates and unrelated eukaryotic transcriptomes/genomes. Six pathways were common to all four Symbiodinium clades including the phosphatidylinositol signaling system and inositol phosphate metabolism pathways. The list of Symbiodinium transcripts common to all four clades included conserved genes such as heat shock proteins (Hsp70 and Hsp90), calmodulin, actin and tubulin, several ribosomal, photosynthetic and cytochrome genes and chloroplast-based heme-containing cytochrome P450, involved in the biosynthesis of xanthophylls. Antioxidant genes, which are important in stress responses, were also preserved, as were a number of calcium-dependent and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases that may play a role in the establishment of symbiosis. Our findings disclose new knowledge about the genetic uniqueness of symbiotic dinoflagellates and provide a list of homologous genes important for the foundation of coral-algal symbiosis.The ISME Journal advance online publication, 24 October 2014; doi:10.1038/ismej.2014.182.
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The Impact of Selective-Logging and Forest Clearance for Oil Palm on Fungal Communities in Borneo.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Tropical forests are being rapidly altered by logging, and cleared for agriculture. Understanding the effects of these land use changes on soil fungi, which play vital roles in the soil ecosystem functioning and services, is a major conservation frontier. Using 454-pyrosequencing of the ITS1 region of extracted soil DNA, we compared communities of soil fungi between unlogged, once-logged, and twice-logged rainforest, and areas cleared for oil palm, in Sabah, Malaysia. Overall fungal community composition differed significantly between forest and oil palm plantation. The OTU richness and Chao 1 were higher in forest, compared to oil palm plantation. As a proportion of total reads, Basidiomycota were more abundant in forest soil, compared to oil palm plantation soil. The turnover of fungal OTUs across space, true ?-diversity, was also higher in forest than oil palm plantation. Ectomycorrhizal (EcM) fungal abundance was significantly different between land uses, with highest relative abundance (out of total fungal reads) observed in unlogged forest soil, lower abundance in logged forest, and lowest in oil palm. In their entirety, these results indicate a pervasive effect of conversion to oil palm on fungal community structure. Such wholesale changes in fungal communities might impact the long-term sustainability of oil palm agriculture. Logging also has more subtle long term effects, on relative abundance of EcM fungi, which might affect tree recruitment and nutrient cycling. However, in general the logged forest retains most of the diversity and community composition of unlogged forest.
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A Complex Recombination Pattern in the Genome of Allotetraploid Brassica napus as Revealed by a High-Density Genetic Map.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Polyploidy plays a crucial role in plant evolution. Brassica napus (2n?=?38, AACC), the most important oil crop in the Brassica genus, is an allotetraploid that originated through natural doubling of chromosomes after the hybridization of its progenitor species, B. rapa (2n?=?20, AA) and B. oleracea (2n?=?18, CC). A better understanding of the evolutionary relationship between B. napus and B. rapa, B. oleracea, as well as Arabidopsis, which has a common ancestor with these three species, will provide valuable information about the generation and evolution of allopolyploidy. Based on a high-density genetic map with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, we performed a comparative genomic analysis of B. napus with Arabidopsis and its progenitor species B. rapa and B. oleracea. Based on the collinear relationship of B. rapa and B. oleracea in the B. napus genetic map, the B. napus genome was found to consist of 70.1% of the skeleton components of the chromosomes of B. rapa and B. oleracea, with 17.7% of sequences derived from reciprocal translocation between homoeologous chromosomes between the A- and C-genome and 3.6% of sequences derived from reciprocal translocation between non-homologous chromosomes at both intra- and inter-genomic levels. The current study thus provides insights into the formation and evolution of the allotetraploid B. napus genome, which will allow for more accurate transfer of genomic information from B. rapa, B. oleracea and Arabidopsis to B. napus.
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Genome-wide delineation of natural variation for pod shatter resistance in Brassica napus.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Resistance to pod shattering (shatter resistance) is a target trait for global rapeseed (canola, Brassica napus L.), improvement programs to minimise grain loss in the mature standing crop, and during windrowing and mechanical harvest. We describe the genetic basis of natural variation for shatter resistance in B. napus and show that several quantitative trait loci (QTL) control this trait. To identify loci underlying shatter resistance, we used a novel genotyping-by-sequencing approach DArT-Seq. QTL analysis detected a total of 12 significant QTL on chromosomes A03, A07, A09, C03, C04, C06, and C08; which jointly account for approximately 57% of the genotypic variation in shatter resistance. Through Genome-Wide Association Studies, we show that a large number of loci, including those that are involved in shattering in Arabidopsis, account for variation in shatter resistance in diverse B. napus germplasm. Our results indicate that genetic diversity for shatter resistance genes in B. napus is limited; many of the genes that might control this trait were not included during the natural creation of this species, or were not retained during the domestication and selection process. We speculate that valuable diversity for this trait was lost during the natural creation of B. napus. To improve shatter resistance, breeders will need to target the introduction of useful alleles especially from genotypes of other related species of Brassica, such as those that we have identified.
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Sustainable management in crop monocultures: the impact of retaining forest on oil palm yield.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Tropical agriculture is expanding rapidly at the expense of forest, driving a global extinction crisis. How to create agricultural landscapes that minimise the clearance of forest and maximise sustainability is thus a key issue. One possibility is protecting natural forest within or adjacent to crop monocultures to harness important ecosystem services provided by biodiversity spill-over that may facilitate production. Yet this contrasts with the conflicting potential that the retention of forest exports dis-services, such as agricultural pests. We focus on oil palm and obtained yields from 499 plantation parcels spanning a total of ?23,000 ha of oil palm plantation in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. We investigate the relationship between the extent and proximity of both contiguous and fragmented dipterocarp forest cover and oil palm yield, controlling for variation in oil palm age and for environmental heterogeneity by incorporating proximity to non-native forestry plantations, other oil palm plantations, and large rivers, elevation and soil type in our models. The extent of forest cover and proximity to dipterocarp forest were not significant predictors of oil palm yield. Similarly, proximity to large rivers and other oil palm plantations, as well as soil type had no significant effect. Instead, lower elevation and closer proximity to forestry plantations had significant positive impacts on oil palm yield. These findings suggest that if dipterocarp forests are exporting ecosystem service benefits or ecosystem dis-services, that the net effect on yield is neutral. There is thus no evidence to support arguments that forest should be retained within or adjacent to oil palm monocultures for the provision of ecosystem services that benefit yield. We urge for more nuanced assessments of the impacts of forest and biodiversity on yields in crop monocultures to better understand their role in sustainable agriculture.
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Exaggerated exercise pressor reflex in adults with moderately elevated systolic blood pressure: role of purinergic receptors.
Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 10-25-2013
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The neurocirculatory responses to exercise are exaggerated in hypertension, increasing cardiovascular risk, yet the mechanisms remain incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to examine the in vitro effectiveness of pyridoxal-5-phosphate as a purinergic (P2) receptor antagonist in isolated murine dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and the in vivo contribution of P2 receptors to the neurocirculatory responses to exercise in older adults with moderately elevated systolic blood pressure (BP). In vitro, pyridoxal-5-phosphate attenuated the ATP-induced increases in [Ca(2+)]i (73 ± 15 vs. 11 ± 3 nM; P < 0.05). In vivo, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; peroneal microneurography) and arterial BP (Finometer) were assessed during exercise pressor reflex activation (static handgrip followed by postexercise ischemia; PEI) during a control trial (normal saline) and localized P2 receptor blockade (pyridoxal-5-phosphate). Compared with normotensive adults (63 ± 2 yr, 117 ± 2/70 ± 2 mmHg), adults with moderately elevated systolic BP (65 ± 1 yr, 138 ± 5/79 ± 3 mmHg) demonstrated greater increases in MSNA and BP during handgrip and PEI. Compared with the control trial, local antagonism of P2 receptors during PEI partially attenuated MSNA (39 ± 4 vs. 34 ± 5 bursts/min; P < 0.05) in adults with moderately elevated systolic BP. In conclusion, these data demonstrate pyridoxal-5-phosphate is an effective P2 receptor antagonist in isolated DRG neurons, which are of particular relevance to the exercise pressor reflex. Furthermore, these findings indicate that exercise pressor reflex function is exaggerated in older adults with moderately elevated systolic BP and further suggest a modest role of purinergic receptors in evoking the abnormally large reflex-mediated increases in sympathetic activity during exercise in this clinical population.
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Cardiac function and tolerance to ischemia-reperfusion injury in chronic kidney disease.
Nephrol. Dial. Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 10-22-2013
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Cardiac dysfunction is an independent risk factor of ischemic heart disease and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, yet the relationship between impaired cardiac function and tolerance to ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury in experimental CKD remains unclear.
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Neonatal ECMO study of temperature (NEST): a randomized controlled trial.
Pediatrics
PUBLISHED: 10-21-2013
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Despite evidence to support the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in defined groups of newborn infants, rates of impairment among survivors remain high. Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to provide neuroprotection in mature infants exposed to perinatal asphyxia. We hypothesized that therapeutic hypothermia during ECMO would reduce the proportion of infants with brain injury, and thus later impairment.
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Impact of logging and forest conversion to oil palm plantations on soil bacterial communities in Borneo.
Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 09-20-2013
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Tropical forests are being rapidly altered by logging and cleared for agriculture. Understanding the effects of these land use changes on soil bacteria, which constitute a large proportion of total biodiversity and perform important ecosystem functions, is a major conservation frontier. Here we studied the effects of logging history and forest conversion to oil palm plantations in Sabah, Borneo, on the soil bacterial community. We used paired-end Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, V3 region, to compare the bacterial communities in primary, once-logged, and twice-logged forest and land converted to oil palm plantations. Bacteria were grouped into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at the 97% similarity level, and OTU richness and local-scale ?-diversity showed no difference between the various forest types and oil palm plantations. Focusing on the turnover of bacteria across space, true ?-diversity was higher in oil palm plantation soil than in forest soil, whereas community dissimilarity-based metrics of ?-diversity were only marginally different between habitats, suggesting that at large scales, oil palm plantation soil could have higher overall ?-diversity than forest soil, driven by a slightly more heterogeneous community across space. Clearance of primary and logged forest for oil palm plantations did, however, significantly impact the composition of soil bacterial communities, reflecting in part the loss of some forest bacteria, whereas primary and logged forests did not differ in composition. Overall, our results suggest that the soil bacteria of tropical forest are to some extent resilient or resistant to logging but that the impacts of forest conversion to oil palm plantations are more severe.
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Catalysis by desolvation: the catalytic prowess of SAM-dependent halide-alkylating enzymes.
J. Am. Chem. Soc.
PUBLISHED: 09-18-2013
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In the biological fixation of halide ions, several enzymes have been found to catalyze alkyl transfer from S-adenosylmethionine to halide ions. It proves possible to measure the rates of reaction of the trimethylsulfonium ion with I(-), Br(-), Cl(-), F(-), HO(-), and H2O in water at elevated temperatures. Comparison of the resulting second-order rate constants, extrapolated to 25 °C, with the values of k(cat)/K(m) reported for fluorinase and chlorinase indicates that these enzymes enhance the rates of alkyl halide formation by factors of 2 × 10(15)- and 1 × 10(17)-fold, respectively. These rate enhancements, achieved without the assistance of cofactors, metal ions, or general acid-base catalysis, are the largest that have been reported for an enzyme that acts on two substrates.
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High dietary sodium intake impairs endothelium-dependent dilation in healthy salt-resistant humans.
J. Hypertens.
PUBLISHED: 09-17-2013
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Excess dietary sodium has been linked to the development of hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases. In humans, the effects of sodium consumption on endothelial function have not been separated from the effects on blood pressure. The present study was designed to determine if dietary sodium intake affected endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) independently of changes in blood pressure.
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Loading and concurrent synchronous whole-body vibration interaction increases oxygen consumption during resistance exercise.
J Sports Sci Med
PUBLISHED: 09-01-2013
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Exercise is commonly used as an intervention to increase caloric output and positively affect body composition. A major challenge is the low compliance often seen when the prescribed exercise is associated with high levels of exertion. Whole-body vibration (WBV) may allow increased caloric output with reduced effort; however, there is limited information concerning the effect of WBV on oxygen consumption (VO2). Therefore, this study assessed the synergistic effects of resistance training and WBV on VO2. We examined VO2 at different loads (0%, 20%, and 40% body weight (BW)) and vibration intensities (No vibration (NV), 35HZ, 2-3mm (35L), 50Hz, 57mm (50H)) in ten men (26.5 ± 5.1 years). Data were collected during different stages (rest, six 30s sets of squatting, and recovery). Repeated measures ANOVA showed a stage x load x vibration interaction. Post hoc analysis revealed no differences during rest; however, a significant vibration x load interaction occurred during exercise. Both 35L and 50H produced greater VO2 than NV at a moderate load of 20%BW. Although 40%BW produced greater VO2 than 20%BW or 0%BW using NV, no significant difference in VO2 was seen among vibratory conditions at 40%BW. Moreover, no significant differences were seen between 50H and 35L at 20%BW and NV at 40%BW. During recovery there was a main effect for load. Post hoc analyses revealed that VO2 at 40%BW was significantly higher than 20%BW or 0%BW, and 20%BW produced higher VO2 than no load. Minute-by-minute analysis revealed a significant impact on VO2 due to load but not to vibratory condition. We conclude that the synergistic effect of WBV and active squatting with a moderate load is as effective at increasing VO2 as doubling the external load during squatting without WBV. Key PointsSynchronous whole body vibration in conjunction with moderate external loading (app 20% BW) can increase oxygen consumption to the same extent as heavier loading (40% BW) during performance of the parallel squat.While the application of synchronous whole body vibration had no effect on recovery oxygen, under bot vibratory and non-vibratory conditions, the heavier the external load the greater the recovery oxygen consumption levels.Regardless of vibratory condition, during the squatting exercise bout 40% BW produced higher heart rates than 20%BW or 0% BW, and 20% BW produced higher heart rates than 0% BW.There were strong trends toward higher heart rates in both vibratory conditions (50 Hz, 5-6mm; 35 Hz, 2-3 mm) than in the non-vibratory condition regardless of external loading.
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Lower limb orthopaedic surgery results in changes to coagulation and non-specific inflammatory biomarkers, including selective clinical outcome measures.
Eur. J. Med. Res.
PUBLISHED: 08-22-2013
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With an aging society and raised expectations, joint replacement surgery is likely to increase significantly in the future. The development of postoperative complications following joint replacement surgery (for example, infection, systemic inflammatory response syndrome and deep vein thrombosis) is also likely to increase. Despite considerable progress in orthopaedic surgery, comparing a range of biological markers with the ultimate aim of monitoring or predicting postoperative complications has not yet been extensively researched. The aim of this clinical pilot study was to test the hypothesis that lower limb orthopaedic surgery results in changes to coagulation, non-specific markers of inflammation (primary objective) and selective clinical outcome measures (secondary objective).
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Evidence of microevolution of Salmonella Typhimurium during a series of egg-associated outbreaks linked to a single chicken farm.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 08-05-2013
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The bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is one of the most frequent causes of foodborne outbreaks of gastroenteritis. Between 2005--2008 a series of S. Typhimurium outbreaks occurred in Tasmania, Australia, that were all traced to eggs originating from a single chicken farm. We sequenced the genomes of 12 isolates linked to these outbreaks, in order to investigate the microevolution of a pathogenic S. Typhimurium clone in a natural, spatiotemporally restricted population.
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Microhabitats reduce animals exposure to climate extremes.
Glob Chang Biol
PUBLISHED: 07-03-2013
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Extreme weather events, such as unusually hot or dry conditions, can cause death by exceeding physiological limits, and so cause loss of population. Survival will depend on whether or not susceptible organisms can find refuges that buffer extreme conditions. Microhabitats offer different microclimates to those found within the wider ecosystem, but do these microhabitats effectively buffer extreme climate events relative to the physiological requirements of the animals that frequent them? We collected temperature data from four common microhabitats (soil, tree holes, epiphytes, and vegetation) located from the ground to canopy in primary rainforests in the Philippines. Ambient temperatures were monitored from outside of each microhabitat and from the upper forest canopy, which represent our macrohabitat controls. We measured the critical thermal maxima (CTmax ) of frog and lizard species, which are thermally sensitive and inhabit our microhabitats. Microhabitats reduced mean temperature by 1-2 °C and reduced the duration of extreme temperature exposure by 14-31 times. Microhabitat temperatures were below the CTmax of inhabitant frogs and lizards, whereas macrohabitats consistently contained lethal temperatures. Microhabitat temperatures increased by 0.11-0.66 °C for every 1 °C increase in macrohabitat temperature, and this nonuniformity in temperature change influenced our forecasts of vulnerability for animal communities under climate change. Assuming uniform increases of 6 °C, microhabitats decreased the vulnerability of communities by up to 32-fold, whereas under nonuniform increases of 0.66 to 3.96 °C, microhabitats decreased the vulnerability of communities by up to 108-fold. Microhabitats have extraordinary potential to buffer climate and likely reduce mortality during extreme climate events. These results suggest that predicted changes in distribution due to mortality and habitat shifts that are derived from macroclimatic samples and that assume uniform changes in microclimates relative to macroclimates may be overly pessimistic. Nevertheless, even nonuniform temperature increases within buffered microhabitats would still threaten frogs and lizards.
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Land-sharing versus land-sparing logging: reconciling timber extraction with biodiversity conservation.
Glob Chang Biol
PUBLISHED: 06-04-2013
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Selective logging is a major driver of rainforest degradation across the tropics. Two competing logging strategies are proposed to meet timber demands with the least impact on biodiversity: land sharing, which combines timber extraction with biodiversity protection across the concession; and land sparing, in which higher intensity logging is combined with the protection of intact primary forest reserves. We evaluate these strategies by comparing the abundances and species richness of birds, dung beetles and ants in Borneo, using a protocol that allows us to control for both timber yield and net profit across strategies. Within each taxonomic group, more species had higher abundances with land-sparing than land-sharing logging, and this translated into significantly higher species richness within land-sparing concessions. Our results are similar when focusing only on species found in primary forest and restricted in range to Sundaland, and they are independent of the scale of sampling. For each taxonomic group, land-sparing logging was the most promising strategy for maximizing the biological value of logging operations.
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The neural interaction between the arterial baroreflex and muscle metaboreflex is preserved in older men.
Exp. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2013
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Sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity is increased during selective activation of the skeletal muscle metaboreflex with postexercise ischaemia (PEI) in young adults. However, to date, there are no data demonstrating this neural interaction between the arterial baroreflex and the muscle metaboreflex in healthy older adults. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to examine the influence of healthy ageing on the metabolic component of the exercise pressor reflex and its interaction with the arterial baroreflex in the control of sympathetic outflow. Postexercise ischaemia following static hand grip performed at 30% maximal voluntary contraction was used to isolate muscle metaboreflex activation in young [n = 10; 24 ± 1 years old; resting blood pressure (BP) 116 ± 3/64 ± 3 mmHg] and older men (n = 9; 59 ± 2 years old; resting BP 120 ± 2/77 ± 2 mmHg). Arterial BP (Finometer) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were measured continuously. Weighted linear regression analysis between MSNA and diastolic BP was used to estimate arterial baroreflex MSNA gain. There were no age-related differences in the increase in mean BP (young, ?14 ± 3 mmHg versus older, ?15 ± 2 mmHg; P > 0.05) or MSNA burst frequency (young, ?11 ± 2 bursts min(-1)?versus older, ?9 ± 1 bursts min(-1); P > 0.05) during PEI. Likewise, the gain of arterial baroreflex control of total MSNA increased to a similar extent in both groups during PEI (young, -4.2 ± 0.9 baseline versus -6.3 ± 1.1 PEI a.u. beat(-1) mmHg(-1); and older, -3.7 ± 1.1 baseline versus -6.7 ± 1.4 PEI a.u. beat(-1) mmHg(-1); P < 0.05 for both). Collectively, these findings indicate that the neural interaction between the arterial baroreflex and the skeletal muscle metaboreflex in the regulation of MSNA is preserved in healthy ageing.
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Trophic flexibility and the persistence of understory birds in intensively logged rainforest.
Conserv. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2013
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Effects of logging on species composition in tropical rainforests are well known but may fail to reveal key changes in species interactions. We used nitrogen stable-isotope analysis of 73 species of understory birds to quantify trophic responses to repeated intensive logging of rainforest in northern Borneo and to test 4 hypotheses: logging has significant effects on trophic positions and trophic-niche widths of species, and the persistence of species in degraded forest is related to their trophic positions and trophic-niche widths in primary forest. Species fed from higher up the food chain and had narrower trophic-niche widths in degraded forest. Species with narrow trophic-niche widths in primary forest were less likely to persist after logging, a result that indicates a higher vulnerability of dietary specialists to local extinction following habitat disturbance. Persistence of species in degraded forest was not related to a species trophic position. These results indicate changes in trophic organization that were not apparent from changes in species composition and highlight the importance of focusing on trophic flexibility over the prevailing emphasis on membership of static feeding guilds. Our results thus support the notion that alterations to trophic organization and interactions within tropical forests may be a pervasive and functionally important hidden effect of forest degradation.
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Navjots nightmare revisited: logging, agriculture, and biodiversity in Southeast Asia.
Trends Ecol. Evol. (Amst.)
PUBLISHED: 04-17-2013
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In 2004, Navjot Sodhi and colleagues warned that logging and agricultural conversion of Southeast Asias forests were leading to a biodiversity disaster. We evaluate this prediction against subsequent research and conclude that most of the fauna of the region can persist in logged forests. Conversely, conversion of primary or logged forests to plantation crops, such as oil palm, causes tremendous biodiversity loss. This loss is exacerbated by increased fire frequency. Therefore, we conclude that preventing agricultural conversion of logged forests is essential to conserving the biodiversity of this region. Our analysis also suggests that, because Southeast Asian forests are tightly tied to global commodity markets, conservation payments commensurate with combined returns from logging and subsequent agricultural production may be required to secure long-term forest protection.
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A consensus map of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) based on diversity array technology markers: applications in genetic dissection of qualitative and quantitative traits.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 04-06-2013
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Dense consensus genetic maps based on high-throughput genotyping platforms are valuable for making genetic gains in Brassica napus through quantitative trait locus identification, efficient predictive molecular breeding, and map-based gene cloning. This report describes the construction of the first B. napus consensus map consisting of a 1,359 anchored array based genotyping platform; Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT), and non-DArT markers from six populations originating from Australia, Canada, China and Europe. We aligned the B. napus DArT sequences with genomic scaffolds from Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea, and identified DArT loci that showed linkage with qualitative and quantitative loci associated with agronomic traits.
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Impact of small-for-gestational age (SGA) status on gentamicin pharmacokinetics in neonates.
J Clin Pharmacol
PUBLISHED: 03-22-2013
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We compared gentamicin pharmacokinetics among neonates born small-for-gestational age (SGA) and appropriate for gestational age (AGA). We further compared gentamicin pharmacokinetics in subgroups of AGA and SGA neonates born preterm and term and treated within and after the initial week of age. Steady state peak and trough serum gentamicin concentrations were used to calculate clearance (Cl), elimination constant (Kel), volume of distribution (Vd), and half-life (t1/2 ) in infants (n?=?236) who received ?48?hours therapy. Statistical analyses (SPSS 17.0) included chi-square and the non-parametric Mann-Whitney U-test. SGA infants treated early (?7days) (n?=?29) and at postmenstrual ages ?32 weeks (n?=?23) had significantly lower median Kel (0.069/h vs. 0.081/h and 0.067/h vs. 0.075/h) and clearance (0.58?mL/kg/min vs. 0.68?mL/kg/min and 0.46?mL/kg/min vs. 0.65?mL/kg/min), compared to those born AGA. There were no significant differences in pharmacokinetic profiles with later therapy or at more mature ages. The prolonged half-life of gentamicin may need to be considered in dosing regimens for preterm SGA infants in the initial week of life.
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Genome-wide and local pattern of linkage disequilibrium and persistence of phase for 3 Danish pig breeds.
BMC Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-13-2013
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The extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) is of critical importance for genomic selection and marker assisted selection. The primary purpose of this study is to examine patterns of LD in three Danish pig breeds (Duroc, Landrace and Yorkshire); we also examine patterns of persistence of phase between the breeds. We quantify local LD by fitting a model relating LD to physical distance between markers in sliding windows, and use this to visualize how LD varies according to physical position. We use a similar method to examine local persistence of phase.
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Identification of the lateral position of a virtual object based on echoes by humans.
Hear. Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-08-2013
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Echolocation offers a promising approach to improve the quality of life of people with blindness although little is known about the factors influencing object localisation using a searching strategy. In this paper, we describe a series of experiments using sighted and blind human listeners and a virtual auditory space technique to investigate the effects of the distance and orientation of a reflective object and the effect of stimulus bandwidth on ability to identify the right-versus-left position of the object, with bands of noise and durations from 10-400 ms. We found that performance reduced with increasing object distance. This was more rapid for object orientations where mirror-like reflection paths do not exist to both ears (i.e., most possible orientations); performance with these orientations was indistinguishable from chance at 1.8 m for even the best performing listeners in other conditions. Above-chance performance extended to larger distances when the echo was artificially presented in isolation, as might be achieved in practice by an assistive device. We also found that performance was primarily based on information above 2 kHz. Further research should extend these investigations to include other factors that are relevant to real-life echolocation.
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Modelling and visualizing fine-scale linkage disequilibrium structure.
BMC Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 03-07-2013
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Detailed study of genetic variation at the population level in humans and other species is now possible due to the availability of large sets of single nucleotide polymorphism data. Alleles at two or more loci are said to be in linkage disequilibrium (LD) when they are correlated or statistically dependent. Current efforts to understand the genetic basis of complex phenotypes are based on the existence of such associations, making study of the extent and distribution of linkage disequilibrium central to this endeavour. The objective of this paper is to develop methods to study fine-scale patterns of allelic association using probabilistic graphical models.
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Reliable, verifiable and efficient monitoring of biodiversity via metabarcoding.
Ecol. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 03-06-2013
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To manage and conserve biodiversity, one must know what is being lost, where, and why, as well as which remedies are likely to be most effective. Metabarcoding technology can characterise the species compositions of mass samples of eukaryotes or of environmental DNA. Here, we validate metabarcoding by testing it against three high-quality standard data sets that were collected in Malaysia (tropical), China (subtropical) and the United Kingdom (temperate) and that comprised 55,813 arthropod and bird specimens identified to species level with the expenditure of 2,505 person-hours of taxonomic expertise. The metabarcode and standard data sets exhibit statistically correlated alpha- and beta-diversities, and the two data sets produce similar policy conclusions for two conservation applications: restoration ecology and systematic conservation planning. Compared with standard biodiversity data sets, metabarcoded samples are taxonomically more comprehensive, many times quicker to produce, less reliant on taxonomic expertise and auditable by third parties, which is essential for dispute resolution.
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Separation by cell size enriches for mammary stem cell repopulation activity.
Stem Cells Transl Med
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2013
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Mammary gland reconstitution experiments, as well as lineage tracing experiments, have provided evidence for the existence of adult mammary stem cells (MaSCs). In addition, cell sorting techniques for specific cell surface markers (CD24(+)CD29(H)CD49f(H)Sca1(-)) have been used to prospectively isolate MaSC-enriched populations. Although these markers enrich for cell subpopulations that harbor MaSCs, they do not identify regenerative stem cells uniquely. Here, we report that MaSCs can be further defined by the property of cell size. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting was used to analyze sizing beads and further separate populations of cells with varying degrees of forward scatter (FSC). Cells with a low FSC that were approximately <10 ?m in size lacked outgrowth potential and failed to reconstitute the mammary gland when transplanted into the cleared fat pads of syngeneic mice. In contrast, cells >10 ?m in size with a higher FSC had increased outgrowth potential as compared with lineage-negative (LIN(-)) control cells. Limiting dilution transplantation assays indicated that the repopulating ability of LIN(-)CD24(+)CD29(H) cells that were >10 ?m in size was significantly increased as compared with cells marked by CD24 and CD29 alone. These results suggest that MaSCs can be further isolated by sorting based on size/FSC. These findings have critical implications for understanding mammary gland stem cell biology, an important requisite step for understanding the etiology of breast cancer.
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Beginners guide to comparative bacterial genome analysis using next-generation sequence data.
Microb Inform Exp
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2013
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High throughput sequencing is now fast and cheap enough to be considered part of the toolbox for investigating bacteria, and there are thousands of bacterial genome sequences available for comparison in the public domain. Bacterial genome analysis is increasingly being performed by diverse groups in research, clinical and public health labs alike, who are interested in a wide array of topics related to bacterial genetics and evolution. Examples include outbreak analysis and the study of pathogenicity and antimicrobial resistance. In this beginners guide, we aim to provide an entry point for individuals with a biology background who want to perform their own bioinformatics analysis of bacterial genome data, to enable them to answer their own research questions. We assume readers will be familiar with genetics and the basic nature of sequence data, but do not assume any computer programming skills. The main topics covered are assembly, ordering of contigs, annotation, genome comparison and extracting common typing information. Each section includes worked examples using publicly available E. coli data and free software tools, all which can be performed on a desktop computer.
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Predicting polymorphic EST-SSRs in silico.
Mol Ecol Resour
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2013
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The public availability of large quantities of gene sequence data provides a valuable resource of the mining of Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) molecular genetic markers for genetic analysis. These markers are inexpensive, require minimal labour to produce and can frequently be associated with functionally annotated genes. This study presents the characterization of barley EST-SSRs and the identification of putative polymorphic SSRs from EST data. Polymorphic SSRs are distinguished from monomorphic SSRs by the representation of varying motif lengths within an alignment of sequence reads. Two measures of confidence are calculated, redundancy of a polymorphism and co-segregation with accessions. The utility of this method is demonstrated through the discovery of 597 candidate polymorphic SSRs, from a total of 452 642 consensus expressed sequences. PCR amplification primers were designed for the identified SSRs. Ten primer pairs were validated for polymorphism in barley and for transferability across species. Analysis of the polymorphisms in relation to SSR motif, length, position and annotation is discussed.
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Identifying genetic diversity of avirulence genes in Leptosphaeria maculans using whole genome sequencing.
Funct. Integr. Genomics
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2013
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Next generation sequencing technology allows rapid re-sequencing of individuals, as well as the discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), for genomic diversity and evolutionary analyses. By sequencing two isolates of the fungal plant pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans, the causal agent of blackleg disease in Brassica crops, we have generated a resource of over 76 million sequence reads aligned to the reference genome. We identified over 21,000 SNPs with an overall SNP frequency of one SNP every 2,065 bp. Sequence validation of a selection of these SNPs in additional isolates collected throughout Australia indicates a high degree of polymorphism in the Australian population. In preliminary phylogenetic analysis, isolates from Western Australia clustered together and those collected from Brassica juncea stubble were identical. These SNPs provide a novel marker resource to study the genetic diversity of this pathogen. We demonstrate that re-sequencing provides a method of validating previously characterised SNPs and analysing differences in important genes, such as the disease related avirulence genes of L. maculans. Understanding the genetic characteristics of this devastating pathogen is vital in developing long-term solutions to managing blackleg disease in Brassica crops.
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Draft genome sequence of chickpea (Cicer arietinum) provides a resource for trait improvement.
Nat. Biotechnol.
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2013
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Chickpea (Cicer arietinum) is the second most widely grown legume crop after soybean, accounting for a substantial proportion of human dietary nitrogen intake and playing a crucial role in food security in developing countries. We report the ?738-Mb draft whole genome shotgun sequence of CDC Frontier, a kabuli chickpea variety, which contains an estimated 28,269 genes. Resequencing and analysis of 90 cultivated and wild genotypes from ten countries identifies targets of both breeding-associated genetic sweeps and breeding-associated balancing selection. Candidate genes for disease resistance and agronomic traits are highlighted, including traits that distinguish the two main market classes of cultivated chickpea--desi and kabuli. These data comprise a resource for chickpea improvement through molecular breeding and provide insights into both genome diversity and domestication.
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Dispersion and domestication shaped the genome of bread wheat.
Plant Biotechnol. J.
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2013
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Despite the international significance of wheat, its large and complex genome hinders genome sequencing efforts. To assess the impact of selection on this genome, we have assembled genomic regions representing genes for chromosomes 7A, 7B and 7D. We demonstrate that the dispersion of wheat to new environments has shaped the modern wheat genome. Most genes are conserved between the three homoeologous chromosomes. We found differential gene loss that supports current theories on the evolution of wheat, with greater loss observed in the A and B genomes compared with the D. Analysis of intervarietal polymorphisms identified fewer polymorphisms in the D genome, supporting the hypothesis of early gene flow between the tetraploid and hexaploid. The enrichment for genes on the D genome that confer environmental adaptation may be associated with dispersion following wheat domestication. Our results demonstrate the value of applying next-generation sequencing technologies to assemble gene-rich regions of complex genomes and investigate polyploid genome evolution. We anticipate the genome-wide application of this reduced-complexity syntenic assembly approach will accelerate crop improvement efforts not only in wheat, but also in other polyploid crops of significance.
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Womens intercollegiate athletic competition: cortisol, testosterone, and the dual-hormone hypothesis as it relates to status among teammates.
Horm Behav
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2013
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Recent research suggests that testosterone and cortisol jointly regulate dominance motivation and, perhaps, the status relationships that are affected by it. For this article, the results of six different studies of womens intercollegiate athletic competition were combined to give a sample size of almost ninety women for whom we had before- and after-competition values for salivary cortisol and testosterone for at least one and sometimes two competitions. For many of these women, we had surveys that allowed us to assess their status with teammates. In no matter what sport (soccer, softball, volleyball, and tennis) levels of salivary cortisol and testosterone increased when women participated in athletic competition. Salivary levels of C and T appear to rise in parallel during competition and increases in levels of one hormone are significantly related to increases in the other. Salivary levels of these hormones typically decreased for teammates who did not play but watched the competition from the sidelines. For women who played in two competitions, individual differences in the positive effect of competition on cortisol and testosterone were conserved from one competition to the next, affirming the personal consistency of endocrine responses to competition. Status with teammates was positively related to before-competition levels of testosterone, but only for women with relatively low before-competition levels of cortisol. This result provides novel support for the "dual-hormone hypothesis" as it relates to predicting social status in womens athletic teams - natural social groups of individuals who know each other and whose social hierarchy has evolved over the course of practice and play for at least one and, in some cases, several years of intercollegiate athletic competition.
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Gauging the threat: the first population estimate for white sharks in South Africa using photo identification and automated software.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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South Africa is reputed to host the worlds largest remaining population of white sharks, yet no studies have accurately determined a population estimate based on mark-recapture of live individuals. We used dorsal fin photographs (fin IDs) to identify white sharks in Gansbaai, South Africa, from January 2007-December 2011. We used the computer programme DARWIN to catalogue and match fin IDs of individuals; this is the first study to successfully use the software for white shark identification. The programme performed well despite a number of individual fins showing drastic changes in dorsal fin shape over time. Of 1682 fin IDs used, 532 unique individuals were identified. We estimated population size using the open-population POPAN parameterisation in Program MARK, which estimated the superpopulation size at 908 (95% confidence interval 808-1008). This estimated population size is considerably larger than those described at other aggregation areas of the species and is comparable to a previous South African population estimate conducted 16 years prior. Our assessment suggests the species has not made a marked recovery since being nationally protected in 1991. As such, additional international protection may prove vital for the long-term conservation of this threatened species.
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Impacts of intensive logging on the trophic organisation of ant communities in a biodiversity hotspot.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Trophic organisation defines the flow of energy through ecosystems and is a key component of community structure. Widespread and intensifying anthropogenic disturbance threatens to disrupt trophic organisation by altering species composition and relative abundances and by driving shifts in the trophic ecology of species that persist in disturbed ecosystems. We examined how intensive disturbance caused by selective logging affects trophic organisation in the biodiversity hotspot of Sabah, Borneo. Using stable nitrogen isotopes, we quantified the positions in the food web of 159 leaf-litter ant species in unlogged and logged rainforest and tested four predictions: (i) there is a negative relationship between the trophic position of a species in unlogged forest and its change in abundance following logging, (ii) the trophic positions of species are altered by logging, (iii) disturbance alters the frequency distribution of trophic positions within the ant assemblage, and (iv) disturbance reduces food chain length. We found that ant abundance was 30% lower in logged forest than in unlogged forest but changes in abundance of individual species were not related to trophic position, providing no support for prediction (i). However, trophic positions of individual species were significantly higher in logged forest, supporting prediction (ii). Consequently, the frequency distribution of trophic positions differed significantly between unlogged and logged forest, supporting prediction (iii), and food chains were 0.2 trophic levels longer in logged forest, the opposite of prediction (iv). Our results demonstrate that disturbance can alter trophic organisation even without trophically-biased changes in community composition. Nonetheless, the absence of any reduction in food chain length in logged forest suggests that species-rich arthropod food webs do not experience trophic downgrading or a related collapse in trophic organisation despite the disturbance caused by logging. These food webs appear able to bend without breaking in the face of some forms of anthropogenic disturbance.
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Catalytic proficiency: the extreme case of S-O cleaving sulfatases.
J. Am. Chem. Soc.
PUBLISHED: 12-22-2011
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As benchmarks for judging the catalytic power of sulfate monoesterases, we sought to determine the rates of spontaneous hydrolysis of unactivated alkyl sulfate monoesters by S-O bond cleavage. Neopentyl sulfate proved to be unsuitable for this purpose, since it was found to undergo hydrolysis by a C-O bond cleaving mechanism with rearrangement of its carbon skeleton. Instead, we examined the temperature dependence of the spontaneous hydrolyses of aryl sulfate monoesters, which proceed by S-O cleavage. Extrapolation of a Bronsted plot [log(k(25)(N)) = (-1.81 ± 0.09) pK(a)(LG) + (3.6 ± 0.7)] based on the rate constants at 25 °C for hydrolysis of a series of sulfate monoesters to a pK(a)(LG) value of 16.1, typical of an aliphatic alcohol, yields k(25)(N) = 3 × 10(-26) s(-1). Comparison of that value with established k(cat) values of bacterial sulfatases indicates that these enzymes produce rate enhancements (k(cat)/k(uncat)) of up to 2 × 10(26)-fold for the hydrolysis of sulfate monoesters. These rate enhancements surpass by several orders of magnitude the ~10(21)-fold rate enhancements that are generated by phosphohydrolases, the most powerful biological catalysts previously known. The hydrolytic rates of phosphate and sulfate monoesters are compared directly, and the misleading impression that the two classes of ester are of similar reactivity is dispelled.
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Seven- to eight-year follow-up of the CoolCap trial of head cooling for neonatal encephalopathy.
Pediatr. Res.
PUBLISHED: 12-21-2011
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We sought to determine whether 18- to 22-mo neurodevelopmental outcomes predicted functional outcomes at 7-8 y for survivors of the CoolCap study of therapeutic hypothermia for neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.
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Bioinformatics tools and databases for analysis of next-generation sequence data.
Brief Funct Genomics
PUBLISHED: 12-19-2011
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Genome sequencing has been revolutionized by next-generation technologies, which can rapidly produce vast quantities of data at relatively low cost. With data production now no longer being limited, there is a huge challenge to analyse the data flood and interpret biological meaning. Bioinformatics scientists have risen to the challenge and a large number of software tools and databases have been produced and these continue to evolve with this rapidly advancing field. Here, we outline some of the tools and databases commonly used for the analysis of next-generation sequence data with comment on their utility.
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The conservation value of South East Asias highly degraded forests: evidence from leaf-litter ants.
Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B, Biol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 10-19-2011
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South East Asia is widely regarded as a centre of threatened biodiversity owing to extensive logging and forest conversion to agriculture. In particular, forests degraded by repeated rounds of intensive logging are viewed as having little conservation value and are afforded meagre protection from conversion to oil palm. Here, we determine the biological value of such heavily degraded forests by comparing leaf-litter ant communities in unlogged (natural) and twice-logged forests in Sabah, Borneo. We accounted for impacts of logging on habitat heterogeneity by comparing species richness and composition at four nested spatial scales, and examining how species richness was partitioned across the landscape in each habitat. We found that twice-logged forest had fewer species occurrences, lower species richness at small spatial scales and altered species composition compared with natural forests. However, over 80 per cent of species found in unlogged forest were detected within twice-logged forest. Moreover, greater species turnover among sites in twice-logged forest resulted in identical species richness between habitats at the largest spatial scale. While two intensive logging cycles have negative impacts on ant communities, these degraded forests clearly provide important habitat for numerous species and preventing their conversion to oil palm and other crops should be a conservation priority.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.