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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
[Recommended screening and preventive practices for long-term survivors after hematopoietic cell transplantation].
Rinsho Ketsueki
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2014
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Advances in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) technology and supportive care techniques have led to improvements in long-term survival after HCT. Emerging indications for transplantation, introduction of newer graft sources (eg, umbilical cord blood) and transplantation of older patients using less intense conditioning regimens have also contributed to an increase in the number of HCT survivors. These survivors are at risk for developing late complications secondary to pre-, peri-, and posttransplantation exposures and risk factors. Guidelines for screening and preventive practices for HCT survivors were published in 2006. An international group of transplantation experts was convened in 2011 to review contemporary literature and update the recommendations while considering the changing practice of transplantation and international applicability of these guidelines. This review provides the updated recommendations for screening and preventive practices for pediatric and adult survivors of autologous and allogeneic HCT.
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Transplantation for children with acute myeloid leukemia: a comparison of outcomes with reduced intensity and myeloablative regimens.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2014
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The safety and efficacy of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens for the treatment of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia is unknown. We compared the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in children with acute myeloid leukemia using RIC regimens with those receiving myeloablative-conditioning (MAC) regimens. A total of 180 patients were evaluated (39 with RIC and 141 with MAC regimens). Results of univariate and multivariate analysis showed no significant differences in the rates of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease, leukemia-free, and overall survival between treatment groups. The 5-year probabilities of overall survival with RIC and MAC regimens were 45% and 48%, respectively (P = .99). Moreover, relapse rates were not higher with RIC compared with MAC regimens (39% vs 39%; P = .95), and recipients of MAC regimens were not at higher risk for transplant-related mortality compared with recipients of RIC regimens (16% vs 16%; P = .73). After carefully controlled analyses, we found that in this relatively modest study population, the data supported a role for RIC regimens for acute myeloid leukemia in children undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. The data also provided justification for designing a carefully controlled randomized clinical trial that examines the efficacy of regimen intensity in this population.
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Earlier diagnosis of invasive fusariosis with Aspergillus serum galactomannan testing.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Cross-reactivity of Fusarium species with serum galactomannan antigen (GMI) test has been observed. We sought to evaluate if GMI could help to early diagnose invasive fusariosis and to monitor treatment response. We reviewed the records of all patients with invasive fusariosis between 2008 and 2012 in three Brazilian hospitals. We selected patients who had at least 1 GMI test within 2 days before or after the date of the first clinical manifestation of fusariosis, and analyzed the temporal relationship between the first positive GMI test and the date of the diagnosis of invasive fusariosis, and the kinetics of GMI in relation to patients' response to treatment. We also selected 18 controls to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the test. Among 18 patients, 15 (83%) had at least one positive GMI (median 4, range 1-15). The sensitivity and specificity of was 83% and 67%, respectively. GMI was positive before the diagnosis of invasive fusariosis in 11 of the 15 cases (73%), at a median of 10 days (range 3-39), and after the diagnosis in 4 cases. GMI became negative in 8 of the 15 patients; 3 of these 8 patients (37.5%) were alive 90 days after the diagnosis of fusariosis compared with 2 of 7 (29%) who did not normalize GMI (p = 1.0). GMI is frequently positive in invasive fusariosis, and becomes positive before diagnosis in most patients. These findings may have important implications for the choice of antifungal therapy in settings with high prevalence of invasive fusariosis.
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The water supply system as a potential source of fungal infection in paediatric haematopoietic stem cell units.
BMC Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2013
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We conducted a prospective study to investigate the presence of microfungal contamination in the water supply system of the Oncology Paediatric Institute, Sao Paulo -- Brazil after the occurrence of one invasive Fusarium solani infection in a patient after Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT). During a twelve-month period, we investigated the water supply system of the HSCT unit by monitoring a total of fourteen different collection sites.
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Recommended screening and preventive practices for long-term survivors after hematopoietic cell transplantation.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 10-21-2011
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Advances in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) technology and supportive care techniques have led to improvements in long-term survival after HCT. Emerging indications for transplantation, introduction of newer graft sources (eg, umbilical cord blood) and transplantation of older patients using less intense conditioning regimens have also contributed to an increase in the number of HCT survivors. These survivors are at risk for developing late complications secondary to pre-, peri-, and posttransplantation exposures and risk factors. Guidelines for screening and preventive practices for HCT survivors were published in 2006. An international group of transplantation experts was convened in 2011 to review contemporary literature and update the recommendations while considering the changing practice of transplantation and international applicability of these guidelines. This review provides the updated recommendations for screening and preventive practices for pediatric and adult survivors of autologous and allogeneic HCT.
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Outcome of myeloablative conditioning and unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in third remission.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 03-25-2011
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We conducted a retrospective study of 155 children who underwent unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) between 1990 and 2005 for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in third remission. The median patient age was 11 years, the median time from diagnosis to first relapse was 36 months, and the median time from first relapse to second relapse was 26 months. Stem cell sources were bone marrow (n = 115), peripheral blood (n = 11), and cord blood (n = 29). All patients received a myeloablative pretransplantation conditioning regimen. The 5-year estimates of leukemia-free survival, relapse, and nonrelapse mortality were 30%, 25%, and 45%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the only risk factor associated with relapse was the interval between the first relapse and the second relapse. Second relapses occurring >26 months from the first relapse were associated with lower risk for post-HCT relapse compared with second relapses occurring at ?26 months (relative risk, 0.4; P = .01). Relapse risk was lowest when late second relapse was preceded by late first relapse (>36 months from diagnosis), as demonstrated by a 3-year relapse rate of 9% (P = .0009). Our data indicate that long-term leukemia-free survival can be achieved in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in third remission using unrelated donor HCT, especially when the second relapse occurs late.
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Rapid, low-cost MR imaging protocol to document central nervous system and sinus abnormalities prior to pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
Pediatr Radiol
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2011
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Patients undergoing bone marrow transplant (BMT) are at risk for infectious complications, including those of the sinus. Central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities related to the chemotherapy or radiation that the patient received for the treatment of underlying malignancy or to transplant-related effects are also commonly seen. The only effective way to differentiate pre- and post-transplant causes is to have a baseline evaluation prior to the admission for transplant. The current method used to evaluate these patients is head CT. However, CT is not accurate to demonstrate CNS abnormalities and exposes the patient to radiation. MRI, despite better sensitivity for white matter abnormalities, has not been routinely used because of the higher cost and longer duration of the exam. Therefore, we designed a fast, low-cost and radiation-free MRI-based protocol to simultaneously evaluate sinus and brain abnormalities.
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Outcomes of pediatric bone marrow transplantation for leukemia and myelodysplasia using matched sibling, mismatched related, or matched unrelated donors.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 07-29-2010
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Although some trials have allowed matched or single human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched related donors (mmRDs) along with HLA-matched sibling donors (MSDs) for pediatric bone marrow transplantation in early-stage hematologic malignancies, whether mmRD grafts lead to similar outcomes is not known. We compared patients < 18 years old reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research with acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and myelodysplastic syndrome undergoing allogeneic T-replete, myeloablative bone marrow transplantation between 1993 and 2006. In total, patients receiving bone marrow from 1208 MSDs, 266 8/8 allelic-matched unrelated donors (URDs), and 151 0-1 HLA-antigen mmRDs were studied. Multivariate analysis showed that recipients of MSD transplants had less transplantation-related mortality, acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and chronic GVHD, along with better disease-free and overall survival than the URD and mmRD groups. No differences were observed in transplant-related mortality, acute and chronic GVHD, relapse, disease-free survival, or overall survival between the mmRD and URD groups. These data show that mmRD and 8/8 URD outcomes are similar, whereas MSD outcomes are superior to the other 2 sources. Whether allele level typing could identify mmRD recipients with better outcomes will not be known unless centers alter practice and type mmRD at the allele level.
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Unrelated donor bone marrow transplantation for myelodysplastic syndrome in children.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 07-16-2010
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We describe long-term disease-free survival (DFS) after unrelated donor bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in 118 patients aged ?18 years. Forty-six patients had refractory cytopenia (RC), 55 refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB), and 17 refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation (RAEB-t). Transplant-related mortality was higher after mismatched BMT (relative risk [RR] 3.29, P = .002). Disease recurrence was more likely with advanced stages of MDS at the time of BMT: RAEB (RR 6.50, P = .01) or RAEB-t (RR 11.00, P = .004). Treatment failure (recurrent disease or death from any cause; inverse of DFS) occurred in 68 patients. Treatment failure was higher after mismatched BMT (RR 2.79, P = .001) and in those with RAEB-t (RR 2.38, P = .02). Secondary MDS or chemotherapy prior to BMT was not associated with recurrence or treatment failure. Similarly, cytogenetic abnormalities were not associated with transplant outcomes. Eight-year DFS for patients with RC after matched and mismatched unrelated donor BMT was 65% and 40%, respectively. Corresponding DFS for patients with RAEB and RAEB-t was 48% and 28%, respectively. When a matched adult unrelated donor is available, BMT should be offered as first-line therapy, and children with RC can be expected to have the best outcome.
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Recommended screening and preventive practices for long-term survivors after hematopoietic cell transplantation.
Rev Bras Hematol Hemoter
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Advances in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) technology and supportive care techniques have led to improvements in long-term survival after HCT. Emerging indications for transplantation, introduction of newer graft sources (e.g. umbilical cord blood) and transplantation of older patients using less intense conditioning regimens have also contributed to an increase in the number of HCT survivors. These survivors are at risk for developing late complications secondary to pre-, periand post-transplant exposures and risk-factors. Guidelines for screening and preventive practices for HCT survivors were published in 2006. An international group of transplant experts was convened in 2011 to review contemporary literature and update the recommendations while considering the changing practice of transplantation and international applicability of these guidelines. This review provides the updated recommendations for screening and preventive practices for pediatric and adult survivors of autologous and allogeneic HCT.
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Late effects in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients with acquired severe aplastic anemia: a report from the late effects working committee of the center for international blood and marrow transplant research.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
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With improvements in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) outcomes for severe aplastic anemia (SAA), there is a growing population of SAA survivors after HCT. However, there is a paucity of information regarding late effects that occur after HCT in SAA survivors. This study describes the malignant and nonmalignant late effects in survivors with SAA after HCT. A descriptive analysis was conducted of 1718 patients post-HCT for acquired SAA between 1995 and 2006 reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR). The prevalence and cumulative incidence estimates of late effects are reported for 1-year HCT survivors with SAA. Of the HCT recipients, 1176 (68.5%) and 542 (31.5%) patients underwent a matched sibling donor (MSD) or unrelated donor (URD) HCT, respectively. The median age at the time of HCT was 20 years. The median interval from diagnosis to transplantation was 3 months for MSD HCT and 14 months for URD HCT. The median follow-up was 70 months and 67 months for MSD and URD HCT survivors, respectively. Overall survival at 1 year, 2 years, and 5 years for the entire cohort was 76% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 74-78), 73% (95% CI: 71-75), and 70% (95% CI: 68-72). Among 1-year survivors of MSD HCT, 6% had 1 late effect and 1% had multiple late effects. For 1-year survivors of URD HCT, 13% had 1 late effect and 2% had multiple late effects. Among survivors of MSD HCT, the cumulative incidence estimates of developing late effects were all <3% and did not increase over time. In contrast, for recipients of URD HCT, the cumulative incidence of developing several late effects exceeded 3% by 5 years: gonadal dysfunction 10.5% (95% CI: 7.3-14.3), growth disturbance 7.2% (95% CI: 4.4-10.7), avascular necrosis 6.3% (95% CI: 3.6-9.7), hypothyroidism 5.5% (95% CI: 2.8-9.0), and cataracts 5.1% (95% CI: 2.9-8.0). Our results indicated that all patients undergoing HCT for SAA remain at risk for late effects, must be counseled about, and should be monitored for late effects for the remainder of their lives.
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The cost of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the real world.
Hematology
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In Brazil, the majority of the population does not have private health insurance and the government provides universal health care. Our Unique Healthcare System pays for 95% of the 1500 hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCT) performed in the country every year. Hospitals are reimbursed a flat rate, ranging from US$ 13,000 for autologous to US$ 40,500 for unrelated donor transplants, excluding expenses with donor search and acquisition of the graft. The actual cost of the procedure is not captured routinely. Because unrelated donor recipients may have many clinical complications, most HSCT centers offer few or no beds to perform such transplants. The Pediatric Oncology Institute - GRAACC - is a non-profit organization that provides comprehensive care at no cost to the families, including unrelated donor HSCT. We are evaluating retrospectively the unrelated donor transplant costs to have data to present to the health authorities, looking for an appropriate funding formula for HSCT.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.