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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Validation of a commercial insulated isothermal PCR-based POCKIT test for rapid and easy detection of white spot syndrome virus infection in Litopenaeus vannamei.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Timely pond-side detection of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) plays a critical role in the implementation of bio-security measures to help minimize economic losses caused by white spot syndrome disease, an important threat to shrimp aquaculture industry worldwide. A portable device, namely POCKIT™, became available recently to complete fluorescent probe-based insulated isothermal PCR (iiPCR), and automatic data detection and interpretation within one hour. Taking advantage of this platform, the IQ Plus™ WSSV Kit with POCKIT system was established to allow simple and easy WSSV detection for on-site users. The assay was first evaluated for its analytical sensitivity and specificity performance. The 95% limit of detection (LOD) of the assay was 17 copies of WSSV genomic DNA per reaction (95% confidence interval [CI], 13 to 24 copies per reaction). The established assay has detection sensitivity similar to that of OIE-registered IQ2000™ WSSV Detection and Protection System with serial dilutions of WSSV-positive Litopenaeus vannamei DNA. No cross-reaction signals were generated from infectious hypodermal and haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV), monodon baculovirus (MBV), and hepatopancreatic parvovirus (HPV) positive samples. Accuracy analysis using 700 L. vannamei of known WSSV infection status shows that the established assayhassensitivity93.5% (95% CI: 90.61-95.56%) and specificity 97% (95% CI: 94.31-98.50%). Furthermore, no discrepancy was found between the two assays when 100 random L. vannamei samples were tested in parallel. Finally, excellent correlation was observed among test results of three batches of reagents with 64 samples analyzed in three different laboratories. Working in a portable device, IQ Plus™ WSSV Kit with POCKIT system allows reliable, sensitive and specific on-site detection of WSSV in L. vannamei.
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Identification of the nanogold particle-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress by omic techniques and systems biology analysis.
ACS Nano
PUBLISHED: 11-22-2011
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Growth inhibition and apoptotic/necrotic phenotype was observed in nanogold particle (AuNP)-treated human chronic myelogenous leukemia cells. To elucidate the underlying cellular mechanisms, proteomic techniques including two-dimensional electrophoresis/mass spectrometry and protein microarrays were utilized to study the differentially expressed proteome and phosphoproteome, respectively. Systems biology analysis of the proteomic data revealed that unfolded protein-associated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response was the predominant event. Concomitant with transcriptomic analysis using mRNA expression, microarrays show ER stress response in the AuNP-treated cells. The ER stress protein markers expression assay unveiled AuNPs as an efficient cellular ER stress elicitor. Upon ER stress, cellular responses, including reactive oxygen species increase, mitochondrial cytochrome c release, and mitochondria damage, chronologically occurred in the AuNP-treated cells. Conclusively, this study demonstrates that AuNPs cause cell death through induction of unmanageable ER stress.
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Comparative analyses of linkage maps and segregation distortion of two F? populations derived from japonica crossed with indica rice.
Hereditas
PUBLISHED: 10-18-2010
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To facilitate genetic research, we constructed two linkage maps by employing two F? populations derived from rice inter-subspecific crosses, japonica Tainung 67 (TNG67)/indica Taichung Sen 10 (TCS10) and japonica TNG67/indica Taichung Sen 17 (TCS17). We established linkage map lengths of 1481.6 cM and 1267.4 cM with average intervals of 13.8 cM and 14.4 cM by using 107 and 88 PCR markers for coverage of 88% of the rice genome in TNG67/TCS10 and TNG67/TCS17, respectively. The discrepancy in genetic maps in the two populations could be due to different cross combinations, crossing-over events, progeny numbers and/or markers. The most plausible explanation was segregation distortion; 18 markers (16.8%) distributed at nine regions of seven chromosomes and 10 markers (11.4%) at four regions of four chromosomes displayed severe segregation distortion (p < 0.01)in TNG67/TCS10 and TNG67/TCS17, respectively. All segregation-distorted markers in these two populations corresponded to reported reproductive barriers, either gametophytic or zygotic genes but not to hybrid breakdown genes. The observed recombination frequency, which was higher or lower than the intrinsic frequency, revealed the association of segregation distortion skewed to the same or different genotypes at the consecutive markers. The segregation distortion, possibly caused by reproductive barriers, affects the evaluation recombination frequencies and consequently the linkage analysis of QTLs and positional cloning.
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A proteomics-based translational approach reveals an antifolate resistance inherent in human plasma derived from blood donation.
J. Proteome Res.
PUBLISHED: 08-17-2010
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The inhibition of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) by antifolates is a common practice both in cell culture and in chemotherapy. Surprisingly, antifolate resistance was also observed in cultured murine myeloma cells (SP2/0) in the presence of human plasma (HP); thus, we used a proteomic approach to identify novel plasma biomarker(s) for this condition. In contrast to the in vitro antifolate response, metabolic enzymes and translation machinery proteins were found to be up-regulated in the presence of HP. The antifolate resistance inherent in HP may be explained by a simultaneous promotion of cell proliferation and the maintenance of DNA integrity. Furthermore, the factor(s) was found to be extrinsic, heat stable and very small in size. Adenine, a supplemented additive in erythrocyte preservation, was subsequently identified as the contributing factor and exogenous addition in cultures reversed the cytotoxicity induced by antifolates. Importantly, adenine-containing blood components, which may provide enhanced survival to otherwise sensitive antifolate-targeted cells, showed a dose-dependent adverse effect in transfusion recipients receiving antifolate (methotrexate) medications. These findings not only highlight a previously unnoticed role of adenine, but also emphasize a novel mechanistic link between transfusion and subsequently reduced survival in patients taking methotrexate.
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A comprehensive evaluation of imidazole-zinc reverse stain for current proteomic researches.
Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2009
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In this paper, we comprehensively evaluated the capability of imidazole-zinc reverse stain (ZN) in comparative proteomics. Three commonly used protein gel staining methods, including silver (SN), SYPRO Ruby (SR), and CB stain were investigated alongside for comparison purpose. A transparency scanning procedure, which may deliver more even and contrasting gel images, was found best for documenting ZN stained gels. Our results showed that ZN was more sensitive than SN, SR, and CB. It may reveal as few as 1.8 ng of proteins in a gel. Moreover, ZN was found to provide a linear dynamic range of staining for revealing proteins up to 140 ng, and show an insignificant staining preference. To analyze a ZN stained 2-D gel image that generally comprises an apparent but even background, the Melanie 4 software was found more suitable than others. Furthermore, ZN demonstrated an equivalent or better MS compatibility than the other three staining methods. Intense and comprehensive MS profiles were frequently observed for ZN stained gel spots. Approximate two-third of ZN stained gel spots were successfully identified for protein identities. Taken together, our results suggest that the prompt, cost effective and versatile ZN is well suited for current proteomic researches.
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Characterization of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) viperin expression, and inhibition of bacterial growth and modulation of immune-related gene expression by electrotransfer of viperin DNA into zebrafish muscle.
Vet. Immunol. Immunopathol.
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Viperin is an anti-viral protein, induced by viral infection. In this study, we examined whether over-expression of viperin in fish muscle could inhibit bacterial growth. We first obtained the cDNA sequence of tilapia viperin, through RT-PCR-mediated cloning and sequencing. The cDNA sequence was similar to those of several fish viperins in GenBank, and it was predicted to encode the conserved domain of radical S-adenosylmethionine superfamily proteins. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that tilapia viperin was most closely related to viperin of Sciaenops ocellatus, Coreoperca kawamebari, and C. whiteheadi. Expression of tilapia viperin was significantly up-regulated in the kidney, liver, spleen, and gills upon challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and poly(I:C) in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Injection of Vibrio vulnificus (204) and Streptococcus agalactiae (SA47) bacteria into tilapia resulted in significant induction of viperin expression in the whole body, kidney, liver, and spleen. Electrotransfer of a viperin-expressing plasmid into zebrafish muscles decreased bacterial numbers and altered expression of immune-related genes. These data indicate that such altered expression may account for the improvement in bacterial clearance following electroporation of viperin, suggesting that fish viperin has antiviral and antibacterial activities.
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Five different piscidins from Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus: analysis of their expressions and biological functions.
PLoS ONE
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Piscidins are antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that play important roles in helping fish resist pathogenic infections. Through comparisons of tilapia EST clones, the coding sequences of five piscidin-like AMPs (named TP1?5) of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, were determined. The complete piscidin coding sequences of TP1, -2, -3, -4, and -5 were respectively composed of 207, 234, 231, 270, and 195 bases, and each contained a translated region of 68, 77, 76, 89, and 64 amino acids. The tissue-specific, Vibrio vulnificus stimulation-specific, and Streptococcus agalactiae stimulation-specific expressions of TP2, -3, and -4 mRNA were determined by a comparative RT-PCR. Results of the tissue distribution analysis revealed high expression levels of TP2 mRNA in the skin, head kidneys, liver, and spleen. To study bacterial stimulation, S. agalactiae (SA47) was injected, and the TP4 transcript was upregulated by >13-fold (compared to the wild-type (WT) control, without injection) and was 60-fold upregulated (compared to the WT control, without injection) 24 h after the S. agalactiae (SA47) injection in the spleen and gills. Synthesized TP3 and TP4 peptides showed antimicrobial activities against several bacteria in this study, while the synthesized TP1, -2, and -5 peptides did not. The synthesized TP2, -3, and -4 peptides showed hemolytic activities and synthesized TP3 and TP4 peptides inhibited tilapia ovary cell proliferation with a dose-dependent effect. In summary, the amphiphilic ?-helical cationic peptides of TP3 and TP4 may represent novel and potential antimicrobial agents for further peptide drug development.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.