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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Development of an anti-claudin-3 and -4 bispecific monoclonal antibody for cancer diagnosis and therapy.
J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 08-12-2014
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Most malignant tumors are derived from epithelium, and claudin (CLDN)-3 and CLDN-4 are frequently overexpressed in such tumors. Although antibodies have potential in cancer diagnostics and therapy, development of antibodies against CLDNs has been difficult because the extracellular domains of CLDNs are too small and there is high homology among human, rat, and mouse sequences. Here, we created a monoclonal antibody that recognizes human CLDN-3 and CLDN-4 by immunizing rats with a plasmid vector encoding human CLDN-4. A hybridoma clone that produced a rat monoclonal antibody recognizing both CLDN-3 and -4 (clone 5A5) was obtained from a hybridoma screen by using CLDN-3- and -4-expressing cells; 5A5 did not bind to CLDN-1-, -2-, -5-, -6-, -7-, or -9-expressing cells. Fluorescence-conjugated 5A5 injected into xenograft mice bearing human cancer MKN74 or LoVo cells could visualize the tumor cells. The human-rat chimeric IgG1 monoclonal antibody (xi5A5) activated Fc?RIIIa in the presence of CLDN-3- or -4-expressing cells, indicating that xi5A5 may exert antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Administration of xi5A5 attenuated tumor growth in xenograft mice bearing MKN74 or LoVo cells. These results suggest that 5A5 shows promise in the development of a diagnostic and therapeutic antibody for cancers.
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A baculoviral display system to assay viral entry.
Biol. Pharm. Bull.
PUBLISHED: 11-06-2013
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In this study, we evaluated a baculoviral display system for analysis of viral entry by using a recombinant adenovirus (Ad) carrying a luciferase gene and budded baculovirus (BV) that displays the adenoviral receptor, coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR). CAR-expressing B16 cells (B16-CAR cells) were infected with luciferase-expressing Ad vector in the presence of BV that expressed or lacked CAR (CAR-BV and mock-BV, respectively). Treatment with mock-BV even at doses as high as 5?µg/mL failed to attenuate the luciferase activity of B16-CAR cells. In contrast, treatment with CAR-BV with doses as low as 0.5?µg/mL significantly decreased the luciferase activity of infected cells, which reached 65% reduction at 5?µg/mL. These findings suggest that a receptor-displaying BV system could be used to evaluate viral infection.
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Acute and chronic nephrotoxicity of platinum nanoparticles in mice.
Nanoscale Res Lett
PUBLISHED: 05-30-2013
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Platinum nanoparticles are being utilized in various industrial applications, including in catalysis, cosmetics, and dietary supplements. Although reducing the size of the nanoparticles improves the physicochemical properties and provides useful performance characteristics, the safety of the material remains a major concern. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the biological effects of platinum particles less than 1 nm in size (snPt1). In mice administered with a single intravenous dose of snPt1, histological analysis revealed necrosis of tubular epithelial cells and urinary casts in the kidney, without obvious toxic effects in the lung, spleen, and heart. These mice exhibited dose-dependent elevation of blood urea nitrogen, an indicator of kidney damage. Direct application of snPt1 to in vitro cultures of renal cells induced significant cytotoxicity. In mice administered for 4 weeks with twice-weekly intraperitoneal snPt1, histological analysis of the kidney revealed urinary casts, tubular atrophy, and inflammatory cell accumulation. Notably, these toxic effects were not observed in mice injected with 8-nm platinum particles, either by single- or multiple-dose administration. Our findings suggest that exposure to platinum particles of less than 1 nm in size may induce nephrotoxicity and disrupt some kidney functions. However, this toxicity may be reduced by increasing the nanoparticle size.
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Tissue distribution and safety evaluation of a claudin-targeting molecule, the C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin.
Eur J Pharm Sci
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2013
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We previously found that claudin (CL) is a potent target for cancer therapy using a CL-3 and -4-targeting molecule, namely the C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE). Although CL-3 and -4 are expressed in various normal tissues, the safety of this CL-targeting strategy has never been investigated. Here, we evaluated the tissue distribution of C-CPE in mice. Ten minutes after intravenous injection into mice, C-CPE was distributed to the liver and kidney (24.0% and 9.5% of the injected dose, respectively). The hepatic level gradually fell to 3.2% of the injected dose by 3h post-injection, whereas the renal C-CPE level gradually rose to 46.5% of the injected dose by 6h post-injection and then decreased. A C-CPE mutant protein lacking the ability to bind CL accumulated in the liver to a much lesser extent (2.0% of the dose at 10min post-injection) than did C-CPE, but its renal profile was similar to that of C-CPE. To investigate the acute toxicity of CL-targeted toxin, we intravenously administered C-CPE-fused protein synthesis inhibitory factor to mice. The CL-targeted toxin dose-dependently increased the levels of serum biomarkers of liver injury, but not of kidney injury. Histological examination confirmed that injection of CL-targeted toxin injured the liver but not the kidney. These results indicate that potential adverse hepatic effects should be considered in C-CPE-based cancer therapy.
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Involvement of NANOG upregulation in malignant progression of human cells.
DNA Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2013
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Previously, we isolated cell lines that display various degrees of transformed phenotypes from a single-cell population of human diploid fibroblasts (RB) containing a large deletion (13q14-22) in one copy of chromosome 13. They included a cell line transfected with SV40 early genes (RBSV), an immortalized cell line (RBI), an anchorage-independent cell line (RBS), and a tumorigenic cell line (RBT). Here, we analyzed gene expression profiles in these cell lines and showed that expression of some fibroblast-specified or mesenchyme-specified genes were downregulated, and those of stem cell-specified genes, including NANOG, were upregulated during malignant progression. When NANOG expression was knocked down with a short hairpin NANOG expression vector (shNANOG vector) in the RBS and RBT cells, the anchorage independency and tumorigenicity were repressed. We next examined various cancer cell lines for NANOG expression and showed that some cancer cell lines expressed a high level of normal and/or variant NANOG proteins. Overexpression of NANOG mRNA in lung adenocarcinoma was also shown by in situ hybridization. All these data indicate the involvement of NANOG in tumorigenesis.
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A novel proapoptotic gene PANO encodes a post-translational modulator of the tumor suppressor p14ARF.
Exp. Cell Res.
PUBLISHED: 05-21-2011
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The protein p14ARF is a known tumor suppressor protein controlling cell proliferation and survival, which mainly localizes in nucleoli. However, the regulatory mechanisms that govern its activity or expression remain unclear. Here, we report that a novel proapoptotic nucleolar protein, PANO, modulates the expression and activity of p14ARF in HeLa cells. Overexpression of PANO enhances the stability of p14ARF protein by protecting it from degradation, resulting in an increase in p14ARF expression levels. Overexpression of PANO also induces apoptosis under low serum conditions. This effect is dependent on the nucleolar localization of PANO and inhibited by knocking-down p14ARF. Alternatively, PANO siRNA treated cells exhibit a reduction in p14ARF protein levels. In addition, ectopic expression of PANO suppresses the tumorigenicity of HeLa cells in nude mice. These results indicate that PANO is a new apoptosis-inducing gene by modulating the tumor suppressor protein, p14ARF, and may itself be a new candidate tumor suppressor gene.
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Hepatoprotective effect of syringic acid and vanillic acid on CCl4-induced liver injury.
Biol. Pharm. Bull.
PUBLISHED: 06-05-2010
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The mycelia of the edible mushroom Lentinula edodes can be cultured in solid medium containing lignin, and the hot-water extracts (L.E.M.) is commercially available as a nutritional supplement. During the cultivation, phenolic compounds, such as syringic acid and vanillic acid, were produced by lignin-degrading peroxidase secreted from L. edodes mycelia. Since these compounds have radical scavenging activity, we examined their protective effect on oxidative stress in mice with CCl(4)-induced liver injury. We examined the hepatoprotective effect of syringic acid and vanillic acid on CCl(4)-induced chronic liver injury in mice. The injection of CCl(4) into the peritoneal cavity caused an increase in the serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels. The intravenous administration of syringic acid and vanillic acid significantly decreased the levels of the transaminases. Four weeks of CCl(4) treatment caused a sufficiently excessive deposition of collagen fibrils. An examination of Azan-stained liver sections revealed that syringic acid and vanillic acid obviously suppressed collagen accumulation and significantly decreased the hepatic hydroxyproline content, which is the quantitative marker of fibrosis. Both of these compounds inhibited the activation of cultured hepatic stellate cells, which play a central role in liver fibrogenesis, and maintained hepatocyte viability. These data suggest that the administration of syringic acid and vanillic acid could suppress hepatic fibrosis in chronic liver injury.
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A claudin-targeting molecule as an inhibitor of tumor metastasis.
J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 05-04-2010
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Tumor metastasis of epithelium-derived tumors is the major cause of death from malignant tumors. Overexpression of claudin is observed frequently in malignant tumors. However, claudin-targeting antimetastasis therapy has never been investigated. We previously prepared a claudin-4-targeting antitumor molecule that consisted of the C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE) fused to protein synthesis inhibitory factor (PSIF) derived from Pseudomonas exotoxin. In the present study, we investigated whether claudin CPE receptors can be a target for tumor metastasis by using the C-CPE-fused PSIF as a claudin-targeting agent. One of the most popular murine metastasis models is the lung metastasis of intravenously injected B16 cells. Therefore, we first investigated the effects of the C-CPE-fused PSIF on lung metastasis of claudin-4-expressing B16 (CL4-B16) cells. Intravenous administration of the C-CPE-fused PSIF suppressed lung metastasis of CL4-B16 cells but not B16 cells. Injection of C-CPE-fused PSIF also inhibited tumor growth and spontaneous lung metastasis of murine breast cancer 4T1 cells inoculated into the subcutis. Treatment with C-CPE-fused PSIF did not show apparent side effects in mice. These findings indicate that claudin targeting may be a novel strategy for inhibiting some tumor metastases.
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Enzymatic conversion of atmospheric aldehydes into alcohol in a phospholipid polymer film.
ACS Appl Mater Interfaces
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2009
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We developed a unique method for converting atmospheric aldehyde into alcohol using formaldehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida (PFDH) doped in a polymer film. A film of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine-co-n-butyl methacrylate) (PMB), which has a chemical structure similar to that of a biological membrane, was employed for its biocompatibility. A water-incorporated polymer film entrapping PFDH and its cofactor NAD(+) was obtained by drying a buffered solution of PMB, PFDH, and NAD(+). The aldehydes in the air were absorbed into the polymer film and then enzymatically oxidized by PFDH doped in the PMB film. Interestingly, alcohol and carboxylic acid were produced by the enzymatic reaction, indicating that PFDH catalyzes dismutation of aldehyde in the PMB film. Importantly, a PFDH-PMB film catalyzes aldehyde degradation without consuming the nucleotide cofactor, thereby allowing repeated use of the film. The activity of PFDH in the PMB film was higher than that in other common water-soluble polymers, suggesting that the hydrational state in a phospholipid polymer matrix is suitable for enzymatic activity.
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[Nature of cancer explored from the perspective of the functional evolution of proto-oncogenes].
Yakugaku Zasshi
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The products of proto-oncogene play critical roles in the development or maintenance of multicellular societies in animals via strict regulatory systems. When these regulatory systems are disrupted, proto-oncogenes can become oncogenes, and thereby induce cell transformation and carcinogenesis. To understand the molecular basis for development of the regulatory system of proto-oncogenes during evolution, we screened for ancestral proto-oncogenes from the unicellular choanoflagellate Monosiga ovata (M. ovata) by monitoring their transforming ability in mammalian cells; consequently, we isolated a Pak gene ortholog, which encodes a serine/threonine kinase as a primitive oncogene. We also cloned Pak orthologs from fungi and the multicellular sponge Ephydatia fluviatilis, and compared their regulatory features with that of M. ovata Pak (MoPak). MoPak is constitutively active and induces cell transformation in mammalian cells. In contrast, Pak orthologs from multicellular animals are strictly regulated. Analyses of Pak mutants revealed that structural alterations in the auto-inhibitory domain (AID) are responsible for the enhanced kinase activity and the oncogenic activity of MoPak. Furthermore, we show that Rho family GTPases-mediated regulatory system of Pak kinase is conserved throughout the evolution from unicellular to multicellular animals, but the MoPak is more sensitive to the Rho family GTPases-mediated activation than multicellular Pak. These results show that maturation of AID function was required for the development of the strict regulatory system of the Pak proto-oncogene, and support the potential link between the development of the regulatory system of proto-oncogenes and the evolution of multicellularity. Further analysis of oncogenic functions of proto-oncogene orthologs in the unicellular genes would provide some insights into the mechanisms of the destruction of multicellular society in cancer.
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A simple reporter assay for screening claudin-4 modulators.
Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun.
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Claudin-4, a member of a tetra-transmembrane protein family that comprises 27 members, is a key functional and structural component of the tight junction-seal in mucosal epithelium. Modulation of the claudin-4-barrier for drug absorption is now of research interest. Disruption of the claudin-4-seal occurs during inflammation. Therefore, claudin-4 modulators (repressors and inducers) are promising candidates for drug development. However, claudin-4 modulators have never been fully developed. Here, we attempted to design a screening system for claudin-4 modulators by using a reporter assay. We prepared a plasmid vector coding a claudin-4 promoter-driven luciferase gene and established stable reporter gene-expressing cells. We identified thiabendazole, carotene and curcumin as claudin-4 inducers, and potassium carbonate as a claudin-4 repressor by using the reporter cells. They also increased or decreased, respectively, the integrity of the tight junction-seal in Caco-2 cells. This simple reporter system will be a powerful tool for the development of claudin-4 modulators.
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Pathological changes in tight junctions and potential applications into therapies.
Drug Discov. Today
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Epithelial cells are pivotal in the separation of the body from the outside environment. Orally administered drugs must pass across epithelial cell sheets, and most pathological organisms invade the body through epithelial cells. Tight junctions (TJs) are sealing complexes between adjacent epithelial cells. Modulation of TJ components is a potent strategy for increasing absorption. Inflammation often causes disruption of the TJ barrier. Molecular imaging technology has enabled elucidation of the dynamics of TJs. Molecular pathological analysis has shown the relationship between TJ components and molecular pathological conditions. In this article, we discuss TJ-targeted drug development over the past 2 years.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.