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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Molecular epidemiological survey of Theileria orientalis in Thua Thien Hue Province, Vietnam.
J. Vet. Med. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 12-24-2010
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Theileria orientalis is a benign bovine protozoan parasite that occasionally causes serious economic loss in the livestock industry. We report the findings of a molecular epidemiological survey of T. orientalis in 94 Vietnamese yellow cattle, 43 water buffaloes, 21 sheep, 21 goats and 85 blood-sucking ticks of cattle in the Thua Thien Hue province of Vietnam. The major piroplasm surface protein (MPSP) gene of T. orientalis was detected using polymerase chain reaction from 13 cattle (13.8%), 11 water buffaloes (25.6%), 1 sheep (4.8%) and 9 ticks (10.6%). Phylogenetic analysis using MPSP gene sequences showed the presence of seven genotypes, four previously categorized genotypes (Types 1, 3, 5 and 7) and three new genotypes (Types N-1, N-2 and N-3).
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Canopy connectivity and the availability of diverse nesting resources affect species coexistence in arboreal ants.
J Anim Ecol
PUBLISHED: 11-30-2010
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1.?Arboreal ants are both diverse and ecologically dominant in the tropics. Such ecologically important groups are likely to be particularly useful in ongoing empirical efforts to understand the processes that regulate species diversity and coexistence. 2.?Our study addresses how access to tree-based resources and the diversity of pre-existing nesting cavities affect species diversity and coexistence in tropical arboreal ant assemblages. We focus on assemblage-level responses to these variables at local scales. We first surveyed arboreal ant diversity across three naturally occurring levels of canopy connectivity and a gradient of tree size. We then conducted whole-tree experimental manipulations of canopy connectivity and the diversity of cavity entrance sizes. All work was conducted in the Brazilian savanna or cerrado. 3.?Our survey suggested that species richness was equivalent among levels of connectivity. However, there was a consistent trend of lower species density with low canopy connectivity. This was confirmed at the scale of individual trees, with low-connectivity trees having significantly fewer species across all tree sizes. Our experiment demonstrated directly that low canopy connectivity results in significantly fewer species coexisting per tree. 4.?A diverse array of cavity entrance sizes did not significantly increase overall species per tree. Nevertheless, cavity diversity did significantly increase the species using new cavities on each tree, the species per tree unique to new cavities, total species using new cavities, and total cavity use. The populations of occupied cavities were consistent with newly founded colonies and new nests of established colonies from other trees. Cavity diversity thus appears to greatly affect new colony founding and colony growth. 5.?These results contribute strong evidence that greater resource access and greater cavity diversity have positive effects on species coexistence in local arboreal ant assemblages. More generally, these positive effects are broadly consistent with niche differentiation promoting local species coexistence in diverse arboreal ant assemblages. The contributions of this study to the understanding of the processes of species coexistence are discussed, along with the potential of the focal system for future work on this issue.
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Dynamics of the leaf-litter arthropod fauna following fire in a neotropical woodland savanna.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2009
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Fire is an important agent of disturbance in tropical savannas, but relatively few studies have analyzed how soil-and-litter dwelling arthropods respond to fire disturbance despite the critical role these organisms play in nutrient cycling and other biogeochemical processes. Following the incursion of a fire into a woodland savanna ecological reserve in Central Brazil, we monitored the dynamics of litter-arthropod populations for nearly two years in one burned and one unburned area of the reserve. We also performed a reciprocal transplant experiment to determine the effects of fire and litter type on the dynamics of litter colonization by arthropods. Overall arthropod abundance, the abundance of individual taxa, the richness of taxonomic groups, and the species richness of individual taxa (Formiciade) were lower in the burned site. However, both the ordinal-level composition of the litter arthropod fauna and the species-level composition of the litter ant fauna were not dramatically different in the burned and unburned sites. There is evidence that seasonality of rainfall interacts with fire, as differences in arthropod abundance and diversity were more pronounced in the dry than in the wet season. For many taxa the differences in abundance between burned and unburned sites were maintained even when controlling for litter availability and quality. In contrast, differences in abundance for Collembola, Formicidae, and Thysanoptera were only detected in the unmanipulated samples, which had a lower amount of litter in the burned than in the unburned site throughout most of our study period. Together these results suggest that arthropod density declines in fire-disturbed areas as a result of direct mortality, diminished resources (i.e., reduced litter cover) and less favorable microclimate (i.e., increased litter desiccation due to reduction in tree cover). Although these effects were transitory, there is evidence that the increasingly prevalent fire return interval of only 1-2 years may jeopardize the long-term conservation of litter arthropod communities.
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Photosynthesis and oxidative stress in the restinga plant species Eugenia uniflora L. exposed to simulated acid rain and iron ore dust deposition: potential use in environmental risk assessment.
Sci. Total Environ.
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2009
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The Brazilian sandy coastal plain named restinga is frequently subjected to particulate and gaseous emissions from iron ore factories. These gases may come into contact with atmospheric moisture and produce acid rain. The effects of the acid rain on vegetation, combined with iron excess in the soil, can lead to the disappearance of sensitive species and decrease restinga biodiversity. The effects of iron ore dust deposition and simulated acid rain on photosynthesis and on antioxidant enzymes were investigated in Eugenia uniflora, a representative shrub species of the restinga. This study aimed to determine the possible utility of this species in environmental risk assessment. After the application of iron ore dust as iron solid particulate matter (SPM(Fe)) and simulated acid rain (pH 3.1), the 18-month old plants displayed brown spots and necrosis, typical symptoms of iron toxicity and injuries caused by acid rain, respectively. The acidity of the rain intensified leaf iron accumulation, which reached phytotoxic levels, mainly in plants exposed to iron ore dust. These plants showed the lowest values for net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, transpiration, chlorophyll a content and electron transport rate through photosystem II (PSII). Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were decreased by simulated acid rain. Peroxidase activity and membrane injury increased following exposure to acid rain and simultaneous SPM(Fe) application. Eugenia uniflora exhibited impaired photosynthetic and antioxidative metabolism in response to combined iron and acid rain stresses. This species could become a valuable tool in environmental risk assessment in restinga areas near iron ore pelletizing factories. Non-invasive evaluations of visual injuries, photosynthesis and chlorophyll a fluorescence, as well as invasive biochemical analysis could be used as markers.
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A PCR based survey of Babesia ovata in cattle from various Asian, African and South American countries.
J. Vet. Med. Sci.
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Babesia ovata is a tick-transmitted hemoprotozoan parasite that infects cattle. In our study, bovine blood samples (n=2,034) were collected from 10 different countries (Brazil, China, Ghana, Japan, Mongolia, the Philippines, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Vietnam) and DNA extracted. The DNA samples were screened using an established and specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting the Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1) gene. Parasite DNA was detected among samples collected from Japan, Mongolia and Thailand. Sequence analyses confirmed that the PCR assay detected only B. ovata AMA-1, and that amplicons from different geographical locations were conserved. Our findings highlight the importance of designing adequate strategies to control B. ovata infection in Japan, Mongolia, and Thailand.
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Expression and immunological characterization of the heat shock protein-70 homologue from Babesia bigemina.
Vet. Parasitol.
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The Babesia bigemina heat shock protein-70 gene (BbigHSP-70) was cloned from cDNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequenced. The length of the gene is 1947 bp and the predicted polypeptide is 649 amino acids long with a calculated molecular weight of 70.85 kDa. BbigHSP-70 has a signal peptide of 15 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequence of BbigHSP-70 showed that B. bigemina was most closely related to B. caballi and B. bovis and lies within a phylogenetic cluster with Theileria. rBbigHSP-70 was expressed in E. coli as a soluble GST-fusion protein with a molecular mass of 96.8-kDa. The serum raised in mice against rBbigHSP-70 detected the native protein in B. bigemina, B. bovis, B. caballi, B. gibsoni, and B. microti lysates and also reacted with B. bigemina, B. bovis, and B. caballi merozoites in the IFAT. Mice vaccinated with rBbigHSP-70 showed lower parasitemia against the challenge infection with B. microti than GST-vaccinated and non-vaccinated controls. These results added a new member of Babesia heat shock proteins70 that is well conserved among intraerythrocytic protozoa and demonstrated its protective effects in an experimental model of rodent babesiosis.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.