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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Photoreactivity of a Quantum Dot--Ruthenium Nitrosyl Conjugate.
J Phys Chem A
PUBLISHED: 11-19-2014
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We describe the use of cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) as antennas for the photosensitization of nitric oxide release from a ruthenium nitrosyl complex with visible light excitation. The CdTe QDs were capped with mercaptopropionic acid to make them water-soluble and the ruthenium nitrosyl complex was cis-[Ru(NO)(4-ampy)(bpy)2]3+ (Ru-NO bpy is 2,2' bipyridine and 4-ampy is 4-aminopyridine). Solutions of these two components demonstrated concentration dependent quenching of the QD photoluminescence (PL) as well as photo-induced release of NO from Ru-NO when irradiated by 530 nm light. A NO release enhancement of ~ 8 times resulted from this association was observed under longer wavelength excitation in visible light range. The dynamics of the quenching determined by both PL and transient absorption measurements were probed by ultrafast flash photolysis. A charge transfer mechanism is proposed to explain the quenching of the QD excited states as well as the photo-sensitized release of NO from Ru-NO.
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Mapping orientational order in a bulk heterojunction solar cell with polarization-dependent photoconductive atomic force microscopy.
ACS Nano
PUBLISHED: 07-31-2014
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New methods connecting molecular structure, self-organization, and optoelectronic performance are important for understanding the current generation of organic photovoltaic (OPV) materials. In high power conversion efficiency (PCE) OPVs, light-harvesting small-molecules or polymers are typically blended with fullerene derivatives and deposited in thin films, forming a bulk heterojunction (BHJ), a self-assembled three-dimensional nanostructure of electron donors and acceptors that separates and transports charges. Recent data suggest micrometer-scale orientational order of donor domains exists within this complex nanomorphology, but the link to the optoelectronic properties is yet unexplored. Here we introduce polarization-dependent, photoconductive atomic force microscopy (pd-pcAFM) as a combined probe of orientational order and nanoscale optoelectronic properties (?20 nm resolution). Using the donor 7,7'-(4,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-4H-silolo[3,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl)bis(6-fluoro-4-(5'-hexyl[2,2'-bithiophen]-5-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole), p-DTS(FBTTh2)2, we show significant spatial dependence of the nanoscale photocurrent with polarized light in both pristine and BHJ blends (up to 7.0% PCE) due to the local alignment of the molecular transition dipoles. By mapping the polarization dependence of the nanoscale photocurrent, we estimate the molecular orientation and orientational order parameter. Liquid crystalline disclinations are observed in all films, in agreement with complementary electron microscopy experiments, and the order parameter exceeds 0.3. The results demonstrate the utility of pd-pcAFM to investigate the optical/structural anisotropy that exists within a well-performing BHJ system and its relationship to optoelectronic properties on both the nanometer and micrometer length scales.
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Nitric oxide releasing materials triggered by near-infrared excitation through tissue filters.
J. Am. Chem. Soc.
PUBLISHED: 11-21-2013
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Novel materials for the phototherapeutic release of the bioregulator nitric oxide (nitrogen monoxide) are described. Also reported is a method for scanning these materials with a focused NIR beam to induce photouncaging while minimizing damage from local heating. The new materials consist of poly(dimethylsiloxane) composites with near-infrared-to-visible upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) that are cast into a biocompatible polymer disk (PD). These PDs are then impregnated with the photochemical nitric oxide precursor Roussins black salt (RBS) to give UCNP_RBS_PD devices that generate NO when irradiated with 980 nm light. When the UCNP_RBS_PD composites were irradiated with NIR light through filters composed of porcine tissue, physiologically relevant NO concentrations were released, thus demonstrating the potential of such devices for minimally invasive phototherapeutic applications.
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Average and Local Structural Origins of the Optical Properties of the Nitride Phosphor La3-xCexSi6N11 (0 < x ? 3).
Inorg Chem
PUBLISHED: 11-15-2013
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Structural intricacies of the orange-red nitride phosphor system La3-xCexSi6N11 (0 < x ? 3) have been elucidated using a combination of state-of-the art tools, in order to understand the origins of the exceptional optical properties of this important solid-state lighting material. In addition, the optical properties of the end-member (x = 3) compound, Ce3Si6N11, are described for the first time. A combination of synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction and neutron scattering is employed to establish site preferences and the rigid nature of the structure, which is characterized by a high Debye temperature. The high Debye temperature is also corroborated from ab initio electronic structure calculations. Solid-state (29)Si nuclear magnetic resonance, including paramagnetic shifts of (29)Si spectra, are employed in conjunction with low-temperature electron spin resonance studies to probes of the local environments of Ce ions. Detailed wavelength-, time-, and temperature-dependent luminescence properties of the solid solution are presented. Temperature-dependent quantum yield measurements demonstrate the remarkable thermal robustness of luminescence of La2.82Ce0.18Si6N11, which shows little sign of thermal quenching, even at temperatures as high as 500 K. This robustness is attributed to the highly rigid lattice. Luminescence decay measurements indicate very short decay times (close to 40 ns). The fast decay is suggested to prevent strong self-quenching of luminescence, allowing even the end-member compound Ce3Si6N11 to display bright luminescence.
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Enhancement of the photoresponse in organic field-effect transistors by incorporating thin DNA layers.
Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl.
PUBLISHED: 08-01-2013
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A mechanistic study of the DNA interfacial layer that enhances the photoresponse in n-type field-effect transistors (FET) and lateral photoconductors using a solution-processed fullerene derivative embedded with disperse-red dye, namely PCBDR, is reported. Incorporation of the thin DNA layer simultaneously leads to increasing the electron injection from non-Ohmic contacts into the PCBDR active layer in dark and to increasing the photocurrent under irradiation. Such features lead to the observation of the enhancement of the photoresponsivity in PCBDR FETs up to 10(3) . Kelvin probe microscopy displays that in the presence of the DNA layer, the surface potential of PCBDR has a greater change in response to irradiation, which is rationalized by a larger number of photoinduced surface carriers. Transient absorption spectroscopy confirms that the increase in photoinduced carriers in PCBDR under irradiation is primarily ascribed to the increase in exciton dissociation rates through the PCBDR/DNA interface and this process can be assisted by the interfacial dipole interaction.
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An efficient, thermally stable cerium-based silicate phosphor for solid state white lighting.
Inorg Chem
PUBLISHED: 07-03-2013
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A novel cerium-substituted, barium yttrium silicate has been identified as an efficient blue-green phosphor for application in solid state lighting. Ba9Y2Si6O24:Ce(3+) was prepared and structurally characterized using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. The photoluminescent characterization identified a major peak at 394 nm in the excitation spectrum, making this material viable for near-UV LED excitation. An efficient emission, with a quantum yield of ?60%, covers a broad portion (430-675 nm) of the visible spectrum, leading to the blue-green color. Concentration quenching occurs when the Ce(3+) content exceeds ?3 mol %, whereas high temperature photoluminescent measurements show a 25% drop from the room temperature efficiency at 500 K. The emission of this compound can be red-shifted via the solid solution Ba9(Y(1-y)Sc(y))(1.94)Ce(0.06)Si6O24 (y = 0.1, 0.2), allowing for tunable color properties when device integration is considered.
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Molecular doping enhances photoconductivity in polymer bulk heterojunction solar cells.
Adv. Mater. Weinheim
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2013
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Addition of low concentrations (<1:100, dopant:donor) of a fluorinated p-type dopant, F4-TCNQ leads to a considerable enhancement of the photocurrent in PCDTBT:PC70 BM bulk heterojunction solar cells. As a result, the power conversion efficiency increases from 6.41% to 7.94 %.
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Self-assembly of an optically active conjugated oligoelectrolyte.
J. Am. Chem. Soc.
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2011
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Conjugated oligoelectrolytes are of emerging technological interest due to their recent function in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices, application in biosensors, and as species that facilitate transmembrane charge migration. Solubility in aqueous, or highly polar, solvents is important for many of these applications; however, there are few studies on how the self-assembly of conjugated oligoelectrolytes into multichromophore species influences linear and nonlinear optical properties. Here, we examine 1,4-bis(4-(N,N-bis(6-(N,N,N-trimethylammonium)hexyl)amino)-styryl)benzene tetraiodide (DSBNI) in water, a conjugated oligoelectrolyte based on the distyrylbenzene framework. We find that DSBNI aggregation leads to increased fluorescence lifetimes, coupled with hypsochromic shifts, and larger two-photon absorption cross sections. Liquid atomic force microscopy (AFM) and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) were used to image DSBNI aggregates and to confirm that the planar molecules stack to form nanocylinders above a critical aggregation concentration. Finally, small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to quantify the aggregate dimensions in situ. Comparison of the results highlights that the hydrophilic mica surface used to image via liquid AFM and the high concentrations required for cryo-TEM facilitate the propagation of the cylinders into long fibers. SANS experiments are consistent with equivalent molecular packing geometry but lower aspect ratios. It is therefore possible to understand the evolution of optical properties as a function of concentration and aggregation and the general geometric features of the resulting supramolecular structures.
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Raman response of dithiolated nanoparticle linkers.
Langmuir
PUBLISHED: 12-09-2010
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We report on a study of the overall surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) response from several thiol-terminated molecules located at interstitial sites between Ag nanoparticles. Multiplexing of the SERS signal was demonstrated along with its dependence of the molecular length, regiochemistry, and the number of thiol groups. The data collected establish pathways for the rational design of the SERS reporters and multiplexed sensory applications.
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Towards enhanced ligand-centred photoluminescence in inorganic-organic frameworks for solid state lighting.
Phys Chem Chem Phys
PUBLISHED: 11-25-2010
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Three novel inorganic-organic framework compounds containing the organic chromophore ligand 9-fluorenone-2,7-dicarboxylic acid (abbreviated H(2)FDC) and barium (BaFDC), cadmium (CdFDC) and manganese (MnFDC), respectively, have been synthesized and evaluated for their use as phosphor materials for solid state lighting and other applications. The results are compared with two earlier reported structures containing the same ligand with calcium (CaFDC) and strontium (SrFDC). The barium- and cadmium-containing compounds both show blue excited, yellow photoluminescence, while the manganese structure does not. The trends in luminescent efficiency for the Ba, Cd, Ca, and Sr derivatives are discussed in relation to crystallographic, optical, and low-temperature specific heat considerations.
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Chapter 14 - Synthesis, characterization, and optical response of gold nanoshells used to trigger release from liposomes.
Meth. Enzymol.
PUBLISHED: 11-12-2009
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Liposomes show great promise as intravenous drug delivery vehicles, but it is often difficult to combine stability in the circulation with rapid, targeted release at the site of interest. Targeting to specific tissues requires developing highly specific ligands with strong affinities to receptors overexpressed on diseased cells; a new cellular target requires developing new ligands and identifying new receptors. Novel photoactivated, hollow, gold nanoshell (HGN)/liposome composites provide a new approach to both controlled release and specific targeting. HGN are extremely efficient near infrared (NIR) light absorbers, and are not susceptible to photobleaching like conventional dyes. Near-complete liposome contents release can be initiated within seconds by irradiating HGNs with an NIR pulsed laser. Targeting the drug is limited only by the dimensions of the laser beam; no specific ligands or antibodies are required, so different tissues and cells can be targeted with the same HGN/liposomes. HGNs can be encapsulated within liposomes or tethered to the outer surface of liposomes for the most efficient drug release. HGNs in liposome solutions can also trigger release, but with lower efficiency. Drug release is induced by adsorbing femto- to nanosecond NIR light pulses that cause the HGNs to rapidly increase in temperature. The resulting large temperature gradients lead to the formation of vapor microbubbles in aqueous solutions, similar to the cavitation bubbles induced by sonication. The collapse of the unstable vapor bubbles causes liposome-membrane rupture and contents release, with minimal damage to the surroundings, and little overall heating of the solution.
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Fluorescence Investigations into Complex Coacervation between Polyvinylimidazole and Sodium Alginate.
Macromolecules
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2009
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Electrostatic interactions between the imidazole-based cationic homopolymer, polyvinylimidazole (PVIm), and anionic polysaccharide, sodium alginate, lead to the formation of colloidal aggregates known as complex coacervates in the pH range 4-6.5. PVIm was labeled with the fluorescent reporter pyrene to investigate the coacervation-induced changes in and around PVIm chains. While the pyrene-tagged PVIm had blue fluorescence in water, the coacervate phase exhibited an additional broad band around 492 nm (green) due to formation of pyrene excimers. Fluorescence spectroscopic investigations point toward aggregation of PVIm chains and desolvation upon coacervation. Highly anisotropic fluorescence emission indicates tight packing of the polymer chains in the coacervate. Confocal microscopy of fluorescein-labeled alginate and rhodamine-labeled PVIm shows coacervates as dense aggregates with uniform distribution of the polymers. Fluorescence spectroscopy offers sensitive and easy investigation into polyelectrolyte interactions.
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All-conjugated triblock polyelectrolytes.
Adv. Mater. Weinheim
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All-conjugated triblock polyfluorenes with well-defined molecular weights and low polydispersities are synthesized via chain-growth Suzuki-Miyaura polymerization. Ionization of pendant alkylbromide chains by pyridine affords amphiphilic triblock polyelectrolytes with neutral/charged/neutral or charged/neutral/charged segments. The immiscible blocks lead to aggregation in polar and nonpolar solvents, and to complex surface morphologies depending on the polarity of the substrate. These triblock polyelectrolytes can also be used as interfacial layers in polymer light-emitting diodes to facilitate electron injection from aluminum.
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Quantum dot photoluminescence quenching by Cr(III) complexes. Photosensitized reactions and evidence for a FRET mechanism.
J. Am. Chem. Soc.
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Reported are quantitative studies of the energy transfer from water-soluble CdSe/ZnS and CdSeS/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) to the Cr(III) complexes trans-Cr(N(4))(X)(2)(+) (N(4) is a tetraazamacrocycle ligand, X(-) is CN(-), Cl(-), or ONO(-)) in aqueous solution. Variation of N(4), of X(-), and of the QD size and composition allows one to probe the relationship between the emission/absorption overlap integral parameter and the efficiency of the quenching of the QD photoluminescence (PL) by the chromium(III) complexes. Steady-state studies of the QD PL in the presence of different concentrations of trans-Cr(N(4))(X)(2)(+) indicate a clear correlation between quenching efficiency and the overlap integral largely consistent with the predicted behavior of a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-type mechanism. PL lifetimes show analogous correlations, and these results demonstrate that spectral overlap is an important consideration when designing supramolecular systems that incorporate QDs as photosensitizers. In the latter context, we extend earlier studies demonstrating that the water-soluble CdSe/ZnS and CdSeS/ZnS QDs photosensitize nitric oxide release from the trans-Cr(cyclam)(ONO)(2)(+) cation (cyclam = 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane) and report the efficiency (quantum yield) for this process. An improved synthesis of ternary CdSeS core/shell QDs is also described.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.